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I am trying to learn the basics of dependency injection (DI). To this end I have undertaken a tutorial that demonstrates using Ninject for DI through the construction of a C# console application.

The application essentially aims to be able to calculate the value of items in a shopping cart using different calculation methods.

The classes in the application are:

  • A simple Product model
  • two shopping cart classes that act as simple wrappers around a collection of Products
  • A ValueCalculator interface which demands a method ValueProducts that returns some total of the items in the carts
  • Two separate implementations of the ValueCalculator interface (iterative and LINQ approaches)

I tried to use conditional injection via the .WhenInjectedTo extension method so that a ShoppingCart object would get a LinqValueCalculator injected and a ShoppingCartTwo object would get an IterativeValueCalulator injected. However, in both cases a LinqValueCalculator is being injected.

See code below

 using System;
 using System.Collections.Generic;
 using System.Linq;
 using System.Text;
 using Ninject;

    namespace NinjectDemo
{

// a simple product model
public class Product
{
    public int ProductID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public decimal Price { get; set; }
    public string Category { set; get; }
}

// calculator interface
public interface IValueCalculator
{
    decimal ValueProducts(params Product[] products);
}

// a specific implementation of the IValueCalculator using LINQ
public class LinqValueCalculator : IValueCalculator
{

    public LinqValueCalculator() {}

    public decimal ValueProducts(params Product[] products)
    {
        return (products.Sum(p => p.Price));
    }
}

// another implementation of IValueCalculator using iteration
// (*2 is to so that it returns a different result to LinqValueCalculator)
public class IterativeValueCalculator : IValueCalculator
{
    public IterativeValueCalculator() {}

    public decimal ValueProducts(params Product[] products)
    {
        decimal totalValue = 0;
        foreach (Product p in products)
        {
            totalValue += (p.Price) * 2;
        }
        return totalValue;
    }
}

// a shopping cart modelling a collection of products
public class ShoppingCart
{
    protected IValueCalculator calculator;
    protected Product[] products;

    public ShoppingCart(IValueCalculator calcParam)
    {
        calculator = calcParam;
        // define the set of products to sum
        products = new []
            {
                new Product() { Name = "Kayak", Price = 275M},
                new Product() { Name = "Lifejacket", Price = 48.95M},
                new Product() { Name = "Soccer ball", Price = 19.50M},
                new Product() { Name = "Stadium", Price = 79500M}
            };
    }

    public virtual decimal CalculateStockValue()
    {
        // calculate the total value of the products
        decimal totalValue = calculator.ValueProducts(products);
        // return the result
        return totalValue;
    }
}

// another, different, shopping cart
public class ShoppingCartTwo
{
    protected IValueCalculator calculator;
    protected Product[] products;

    public ShoppingCartTwo(IValueCalculator calcParam)
    {
        calculator = calcParam;
        // define the set of products to sum
        products = new[]
            {
                new Product() { Name = "Kayak", Price = 275M},
                new Product() { Name = "Lifejacket", Price = 48.95M},
                new Product() { Name = "Soccer ball", Price = 19.50M},
                new Product() { Name = "Stadium", Price = 79500M}
            };
    }

    public virtual decimal CalculateStockValue()
    {
        // calculate the total value of the products
        decimal totalValue = calculator.ValueProducts(products);
        // return the result
        return totalValue;
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IKernel ninjectKernel = new StandardKernel();

        // define the bindings
        ninjectKernel.Bind<IValueCalculator>().To<IterativeValueCalculator> ().WhenInjectedInto<ShoppingCartTwo>();
        ninjectKernel.Bind<IValueCalculator>().To<LinqValueCalculator>();

        // create the carts and inject the dependency
        ShoppingCart cart = new ShoppingCart(ninjectKernel.Get<IValueCalculator>());
        ShoppingCartTwo cartTwo = new ShoppingCartTwo(ninjectKernel.Get<IValueCalculator>());

        // perform the calculation and write out the result
        Console.WriteLine("Total: {0:c}", cart.CalculateStockValue());
        Console.WriteLine("Total: {0:c}", cartTwo.CalculateStockValue());

        Console.Read();
    }
}
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you have a link to the tutorial? –  fordareh Feb 22 '13 at 9:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think your problem is that:-

ninjectKernel.Get<IValueCalculator>()

is evaluating before it gets passed into your constructor.

i.e. it is being called outside of its binding context.

Instead of new'ing up the object yourself, use your kernel to get an object instance.

var shopCartTwo = ninjectKernel.Get<ShoppingCartTwo>();

Note that you're not passing a parameter at all. Ninject will look at the constructor signature, work out that there is an unresolved dependency, and use the appropriate contextual binding.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. –  bradmbow Jan 11 '12 at 0:31
    
Thanks for the response. I tried this and sure enough it worked. How conditional is it though? i.e I had to explicitly ask for a ShoppingCartTwo object...So is the idea to ask ninject for an instance of the class that contains the injection as opposed to asking it to resolve the class from the interface? –  bradmbow Jan 11 '12 at 0:42
    
In a more realised solution, you probably wouldn't be dealing with any concrete implementation of either of your shopping cart objects. You would ask for an IShoppingCart ( with ShoppingCart and ShoppingCartTwo implementing this ). Likely you would have some contextual binding that tells you which one to get in which circumstance. Once that is resolved, ninject would then know which implementation of IValueCalculator to use. What is your final project type going to be, btw? –  Paul Alan Taylor Jan 11 '12 at 7:53
    
I see, this is what ninject means when it says it can handle "chained dependencies". Starting to make sense, I'm finding DI a little abstract. There is no final project so to speak, this was just a simple console app for learning purposes, no plans for it beyond that. Thanks for you help! –  bradmbow Jan 11 '12 at 11:57

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