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was implementing a singular linked list in C.

struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node *next;
};

struct list_el {
   int val;
   struct list_el * next;
};

typedef struct list_el item;

    void main() {
       item * curr, * head,*track;
       int i;
       head = NULL;
       for(i=1;i<=10;i++) {
          curr = (item *)malloc(sizeof(item));
          curr->val = i;
          curr->next=0;
          if(head!=NULL)
          head->next  = curr;
          head = curr;
       }
       curr = curr-10;

       while(curr) {
          printf("%d\n", curr->val);
          curr = curr->next ;
       }
    }

As there are 10 elements in the list, so to make the pointer point to the first element, I tried decreasing curr (pointer to struct) by 10, but this got me half way through the list, the values printed were 5,6,7,8,9,10.

The size of the struct is 4, whereas the size of the pointer is 2, it seems the pointer is decreased by 2*10=20 bytes instead of 40, is this normal? (as I read that pointer increments/decrements according to the size of its type)

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4  
You cannot use pointer arythmetic on a linked list: the items are allocated separately (with malloc) and so they will not be necessarily adjacent in memory. That approach would only work with an array. –  Viruzzo Jan 10 '12 at 14:13
    
@Viruzzo why not post as answer? :) –  Kos Jan 10 '12 at 14:15
    
Done. I was actually just deferring to someone to post a completely correct approach to the problem, but that should be done separately. –  Viruzzo Jan 10 '12 at 14:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You cannot use pointer arithmetic on a linked list: the items are allocated separately (with malloc) and so they will not be necessarily adjacent in memory. That approach would only work with an array.

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There are several problems.

First of all, the following insertion code isn't correct:

      if(head!=NULL) head->next  = curr;
      head = curr;

Basically, the element pointed to by head is irrevocably lost.

Secondly, the behaviour of the following code is undefined:

curr = curr-10;

You cannot move across several malloc()ed blocks using pointer arithmetic.

Once you fix the insertion logic, it will become possible to traverse the list like so:

for (curr = head; curr != NULL; curr = curr->next) {
    ....
}
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The curr part is in fact what he was asking about. –  Viruzzo Jan 10 '12 at 14:19

Your code curr = curr-10 will not bring you back to the head of the linklist.

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Explain also why/why not to get more upvotes ;) –  BlackBear Jan 10 '12 at 14:27

As Viruzzo pointed out in a comment, you cannot use pointer arithmetic on elements of a linked list. As the word "linked" implies, there are only pointers linking the items together, they're not required to be located at adjacent addresses.

The pointer arithmetic will simply decrease the pointer by a fixed number of bytes, it will not follow pointers. Your list, being singly-linked, doesn't even have previous-element pointers to follow.

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thanks, the list points to the next element in the list –  Akash Jan 10 '12 at 14:22

curr = curr-10; is wrong. It does not perform the operation that you think it does!

To print the contents of your linked list, you need to start from the head and go through each and every node until you hit NULL (assuming its not a circular list).

void display()
{
        NODE * current = head;

        if (current == NULL) {
                printf("Empty list \n");
                return;
        }

        while(current != NULL) {
                printf("%d ", current->data);
                current = current->next;
        }

        printf("\n");
        return;
}

And to add new node in the front, you can use the following code snippet.

void addfront(int data)
{
        NODE *newnode = NULL;

        if ((newnode = malloc(sizeof(NODE))) != NULL) {
                newnode->data = data;
                newnode->next = NULL;   
        } else {
                printf("Couldn't allocate space for new element \n");
                return;
        }       

        if (head == NULL) {
                // empty list
                head = newnode; 
                tail = newnode;
        } else {
                newnode->next = head;
                head = newnode;
        }

        return;
}

To add new node at the rear, you can use the following code snippet.

void addrear(int data)
{
        NODE * newnode = NULL;

        if ((newnode = (NODE *) malloc(sizeof(NODE))) != NULL) {
                newnode->data = data;
                newnode->next = NULL;
        } else {
                printf("unalbe to allocate memory to the new element - %d \n", data);
                return;
        }

        if (tail == NULL) {
                assert(head == NULL && tail == NULL);
                head = tail = newnode;
        } else {
                tail->next = newnode;
                tail = newnode;
        }

        return;
}

All the above mentioned code snippet assumes, you have head and tail as global variables.

Hope this helps!

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