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All my unit tests have some common code I can run and abstract into a function. However I want to be able to re-use the Core value in every test

function makeSuite(name, module, callback) {
    suite(name, function () {
        var Core = {};

        setup(function () {
            Core = Object.create(core).constructor();
            Core.module("name", module);
        });

        teardown(function () {
            Core.destroy();
        });

        callback(Core);
    });
}

makeSuite("Server", server, function (Core) {
    test("server creates a server", useTheCore);

    test("server listens to a port", useTheCore);

    test("server emits express app", useTheCore);

    test("server destroys itself", useTheCore);
});

Each time I call useTheCore I expect there to be a different value of the core. This is because the particular unit test library calls the setup method before each test. This clearly does not work because I'm passing {} to the callback by value. And when I overwrite Core it does not propagate.

One hack I can use is __proto__ to emulate pass by reference

function makeSuite(name, module, callback) {
    suite(name, function () {
        var ref = {};

        setup(function () {
            var Core = ref.__proto__ = Object.create(core).constructor();
            Core.module("name", module);
        });

        teardown(function () {
            ref.__proto__.destroy();
        });

        callback(ref);
    });
}
  • Is there a more elegant way to emulate pass by reference, preferably not using the deprecated non-standard __proto__
  • Is there a more elegant solution to the actual problem of code re-use I have.
share|improve this question
    
I don't know if you'll consider this elegant, but it resolves the non-standard issue. Could you just place an ugly property on your var Core = {}; object, like Core.__core_internal_data__ = Object.create(core).constructor();, and then have your API anticipate the existence of that property? Sort of like what NodeJS does with its event emitter system. –  squint Jan 10 '12 at 14:54
    
@amnotiam that means I have to change the callback to reference to be function (_) { doSomething(_.Core); } which is possible but ugly. I want to keep using that Core variable directly –  Raynos Jan 10 '12 at 14:58
    
I don't suppose you'd consider it safe/reliable to .apply() the constructor to the existing prototype? So after the first time setup is called, you'd start doing Object.create(core).constructor.apply(Object.getPrototypeOf(ref)) –  squint Jan 10 '12 at 16:00
    
@amnotiam turns out I don't actually need to do it like this. Core.destroy() cleanly resets the core to the initial state so I can keep applying module and destroy over and over again. –  Raynos Jan 10 '12 at 16:15
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