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I have a large data.frame that was generated by a process outside my control, which may or may not contain variables with zero variance (i.e. all the observations are the same). I would like to build a predictive model based on this data, and obviously these variables are of no use.

Here's the function I'm currently using to remove such variables from the data.frame. It's currently based on apply, and I was wondering if there are any obvious ways to speed this function up, so that it works quickly on very large datasets, with a large number (400 or 500) of variables?

set.seed(1)
dat <- data.frame(
    A=factor(rep("X",10),levels=c('X','Y')),
    B=round(runif(10)*10),
    C=rep(10,10),
    D=c(rep(10,9),1),
    E=factor(rep("A",10)),
    F=factor(rep(c("I","J"),5)),
    G=c(rep(10,9),NA)
)
zeroVar <- function(data, useNA = 'ifany') {
    out <- apply(data, 2, function(x) {length(table(x, useNA = useNA))})
    which(out==1)
}

And here's the result of the process:

> dat
   A B  C  D E F  G
1  X 3 10 10 A I 10
2  X 4 10 10 A J 10
3  X 6 10 10 A I 10
4  X 9 10 10 A J 10
5  X 2 10 10 A I 10
6  X 9 10 10 A J 10
7  X 9 10 10 A I 10
8  X 7 10 10 A J 10
9  X 6 10 10 A I 10
10 X 1 10  1 A J NA

> dat[,-zeroVar(dat)]
   B  D F  G
1  3 10 I 10
2  4 10 J 10
3  6 10 I 10
4  9 10 J 10
5  2 10 I 10
6  9 10 J 10
7  9 10 I 10
8  7 10 J 10
9  6 10 I 10
10 1  1 J NA

> dat[,-zeroVar(dat, useNA = 'no')]
   B  D F
1  3 10 I
2  4 10 J
3  6 10 I
4  9 10 J
5  2 10 I
6  9 10 J
7  9 10 I
8  7 10 J
9  6 10 I
10 1  1 J
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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Don't use table() - very slow for such things. One option is length(unique(x)):

foo <- function(x) {
    out <- lapply(dat, function(x) length(unique(x)))
    want <- which(!out > 1)
    unlist(want)
}

system.time(replicate(1000, zeroVar(dat)))
system.time(replicate(1000, foo(dat)))

Which is an order magnitude faster than yours on the example data set whilst giving similar output:

> system.time(replicate(1000, zeroVar(dat)))
   user  system elapsed 
  3.334   0.000   3.335 
> system.time(replicate(1000, foo(dat)))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.324   0.000   0.324

Simon's solution is similarly quick on this example:

> system.time(replicate(1000, which(unlist(lapply(dat, 
+             function(x) 0 == var(if (is.factor(x)) as.integer(x) else x))))))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.392   0.000   0.395

but you'll have to see if they scale similarly to real problem sizes.

share|improve this answer
    
As I noted in my (weaker) solution, beware of length(unique(x)) unless you're sure x is all integers. –  Carl Witthoft Jan 10 '12 at 17:49

You may also want to look into the nearZeroVar() function in the caret package.

If you have one event out of 1000, it might be a good idea to discard these data (but this depends on the model). nearZeroVar() can do that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion, I've actually been using nearZeroVar(), and this question is based on that function. I've occasionally found myself in the situation where I really only want to remove zero variance variables, and deal with the "near zero variance" variables in another way (for example by later combining several near zero variance variables into a new variable). –  Zach Jan 10 '12 at 16:08

Simply don't use table - it's extremely slow on numeric vectors since it converts them to strings. I would probably use something like

var0 <- unlist(lapply(df, function(x) 0 == var(if (is.factor(x)) as.integer(x) else x)))

It will be TRUE for 0-variance, NA for columns with NAs and FALSE for non-zero variance

share|improve this answer
    
How hard would it be to make it TRUE for columns with all NAs and FALSE for columns with a mix of NAs and other values? –  Zach Jan 10 '12 at 16:10
1  
Nice. Is there any reason -- here or more generally -- to prefer unlist(lapply(...)) to sapply(...)? –  Josh O'Brien Jan 10 '12 at 16:35
    
Well, sapply calls lapply and then works a bit more on the result, and finally calls unlist so I just like to use more primitive functions so I know what they do - that's just my personal preference (sometimes more efficient). –  Simon Urbanek Jan 10 '12 at 17:53
    
Easy - just pass through na.rm to var as you did with table: var0 <- function(df, na.rm=FALSE) unlist(lapply(df, function(x) 0 == var(if (is.factor(x)) as.integer(x) else x, na.rm=na.rm))) –  Simon Urbanek Jan 10 '12 at 17:54

Well, save yourself some coding time:

Rgames: foo
      [,1]  [,2] [,3]
 [1,]    1 1e+00    1
 [2,]    1 2e+00    1
 [3,]    1 3e+00    1
 [4,]    1 4e+00    1
 [5,]    1 5e+00    1
 [6,]    1 6e+00    2
 [7,]    1 7e+00    3
 [8,]    1 8e+00    1
 [9,]    1 9e+00    1
 [10,]    1 1e+01    1
Rgames: sd(foo)
[1] 0.000000e+00 3.027650e+00 6.749486e-01
Warning message:
sd(<matrix>) is deprecated.
 Use apply(*, 2, sd) instead.   

To avoid nasty floating-point roundoffs, take that output vector, which I'll call "bar," and do something like bar[bar< 2*.Machine$double.eps] <- 0 and then finally your data frame dat[,as.logical(bar)] should do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
Carl - try it with the posted data frame - you'll get NAs due to factors ;) –  Simon Urbanek Jan 10 '12 at 15:36
    
@Simon - yeah, I know... I skipped the steps to clean up and/or validate the source data. I plead laziness. –  Carl Witthoft Jan 10 '12 at 17:50

How about using factor to count the number of unique elements and looping with sapply:

dat[sapply(dat, function(x) length(levels(factor(x)))>1)]
   B  D F
1  3 10 I
2  4 10 J
3  6 10 I
4  9 10 J
5  2 10 I
6  9 10 J
7  9 10 I
8  7 10 J
9  6 10 I
10 1  1 J

NAs are excluded by default, but this can be changed with the exclude parameter of factor:

dat[sapply(dat, function(x) length(levels(factor(x,exclude=NULL)))>1)]
   B  D F  G
1  3 10 I 10
2  4 10 J 10
3  6 10 I 10
4  9 10 J 10
5  2 10 I 10
6  9 10 J 10
7  9 10 I 10
8  7 10 J 10
9  6 10 I 10
10 1  1 J NA
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