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I am really struggling to see why the following code will not work and causes a segfault.

Car *newCar;
Car *oldCar;
newCar->engineSize = 1500;
memcpy(newCar, oldCar, sizeof(Car)); 

I am obviously missing something very fundamental here but don't know what it is. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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newCar is a wild (aka "dangling") pointer: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dangling_pointer –  Paul R Jan 10 '12 at 15:10
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to allocate memory for it.

Car* newCar = malloc(sizeof(Car));
Car* oldCar = malloc(sizeof(Car));
...
free(oldCar);
free(newCar);

If you don't need to use the pointer elsewhere, you could use stack-allocation.

Car newCar;
Car oldCar;
newCar.engineSize = 1500;
memcpy(&newCar, &oldCar, sizeof(newCar));
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Here is an easy explanation. –  elmo Jan 10 '12 at 15:11
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newCar needs to be allocated some memory before you can write to it.

Car* newCar = malloc(sizeof(Car));

Right now what you have is just an pointer which points to some random address in the memory and you attempting to write to that address, which results in Undefined Behavior and a seg fault.

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You haven't allocated any memory, so your newCar and oldCar stack variables have random values and point to some arbitrary memory locations that may not be mapped by the process.

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As written, the code is using uninitialized pointers. Both newCar and oldCar are pointers that could have any value, so the assignment and the memcpy result in an attempt to write to whatever address they happen to point to. In reality, the compiler should warn about the use of an uninitialized variable; make sure you have warnings enabled.

Another way is to allocate on the stack:

Car newCar;
Car oldCar;
newCar.engineSize = 1500;
memcpy(&newCar, &oldCar, sizeof(Car)); 

Or malloc the memory:

Car *newCar = malloc( sizeof(Car));
Car *oldCar = malloc( sizeof(Car));
newCar->engineSize = 1500;
memcpy(newCar, oldCar, sizeof(Car)); 
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You can't ignore the ( ... ) in sizeof(Car) because Car is a type. –  KennyTM Jan 10 '12 at 15:13
    
@KennyTM: Thanks - I made the edit. –  Mark Wilkins Jan 10 '12 at 15:14
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You need to allocate space for your Car instances. Try

Car *newCar = (Car *)malloc(sizeof(Car);
Car *oldCar = (Car *)malloc(sizeof(Car);;
newCar->engineSize = 1500;
memcpy(newCar, oldCar, sizeof(Car)); 
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A variable definition such as

Car* newCar;

only gives you a pointer variable. All it can do is hold the address of something called a Car. The memory size of a Car is unknown here, but it can easily be thousands of times larger than what the mere pointer requires.

You need to allocate memory for the actual value before changing it, either through field assignment to e.g. engineSize or by calling memcpy():

newCar = malloc(sizeof *newCar);
memcpy(newCar, oldCar, sizeof *newCar);

Note that there's in general no need to use memcpy(), assuming this is a struct they are assignable:

*newCar = *oldCar;

This reads cleaner, and has less chance of programmer error.

Also, note that the engineSize must be set after the copying is done, otherwise it will be overwritten when you copy:

newCar = malloc(sizeof *newCar);
*newCar = *oldCar;
newCar->engineSize = 1500;
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