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In my previous question I was suggested to use Interface: How to implement identical methods with 2 and more Classes?

But nothing complies as I have no knowledge on how to use Interfaces.

I guess you can call this code pseudo :)

type
  IDoSomething = interface
    ['{EFE0308B-A85D-4DF3-889C-40FBC8FE84D0}']
    procedure DoSomething1;
    procedure WMSize(var Message: TWMSize); message WM_SIZE; // <- Unknown directive: 'message'
  end;

  TMyCheckBox = class(TCheckBox, IDoSomething) // <- Undeclared identifier: 'DoSomething1'
  end;

  TMyRadioButton = class(TRadioButton, IDoSomething) // <- Undeclared identifier: 'DoSomething1'
  end;

implementation

procedure IDoSomething.DoSomething1; // Identifier redeclared: 'IDoSomething'
begin
  // do the same thing for TMyCheckBox and TRadioButton
end;

procedure IDoSomething.WMSize(var Message: TWMSize);
begin
  // handle this message the same as with TMyCheckBox and TRadioButton
end;

How do I use the Interface to centralize the code? and How can I share new properties with the help of the Interface?

share|improve this question
1  
I actually prefer David Heffernan's answer in your original post. Not much to gain with interfaces in this case... –  whosrdaddy Jan 10 '12 at 19:29
    
I'm not sure it can be done much cleaner than the code I offered in your previous question. –  David Heffernan Jan 10 '12 at 20:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. the message keyword is not allowed in an interface method declaration. Remove message WM_SIZE; and the code will run fine until the compiler hits the second problem - see below

  2. Interface methods never have their own implementations. If the IDoSomething interface declares a method DoSomething1, the compiler will not allow to write an implementation like procedure IDoSomething.DoSomething1; like in your code - instead, the class which implements the interface has to provide the implementation body.

share|improve this answer
    
So, how do I implement "DoSomething1" without implementing the same code both in TMyCheckBox and TMyRadioButton? –  ZigiZ Jan 10 '12 at 16:34
    
@user if the implementation code is the same, it can be done with an implementation outside of both classes, for example as a static TMySharedImpl.DoSomething1 method (which should be thread safe) –  mjn Jan 10 '12 at 16:53
    
TMySharedImpl.DoSomething1 is a Class method? –  ZigiZ Jan 10 '12 at 17:24
    
@user yes - class is correct - static is the equivalent keyword in the Java programming language, sorry –  mjn Jan 10 '12 at 17:31
    
so what not use a simple Procedure DoSomething1(aComponent : TComponent);? –  ZigiZ Jan 10 '12 at 17:35

This is my point:

1) You can't include in the interface definition

procedure WMSize(var Message: TWMSize); message WM_SIZE;

because it is actually a dynamic method:

Remember methods in interface definition cannot be declared as virtual, dynamic, abstract, or override.

2) Including in the interface definition

procedure WMSize(var Message: TWMSize);

is a nonsense since it's not the signature of the method meant to be implemented further.

The interface definition should be then the bare:

type
 IDoSomething = interface
   ['{EFE0308B-A85D-4DF3-889C-40FBC8FE84D0}']
   procedure DoSomething1;
 end;

The following class definitions remain unchanged (same for their implementations):

TMyCheckBox = class(TCheckBox, IDoSomething)
  procedure DoSomething1;
  procedure WMSize(var Message: TWMSize); message WM_SIZE;
end;

TMyRadioButton = class(TRadioButton, IDoSomething) 
  procedure DoSomething1;
  procedure WMSize(var Message: TWMSize); message WM_SIZE;
end;


implementation

procedure TMyCheckBox.DoSomething1;
begin
  //
end;

procedure TMyCheckBox.WMSize(var Message: TWMSize);
begin
  //
end;

{ TMyRadioButton }

procedure TMyRadioButton.DoSomething1;
begin
  //
end;

procedure TMyRadioButton.WMSize(var Message: TWMSize);
begin
  //
end;
share|improve this answer
2  
10x, I see your point. but this is exactly what I was trying to avoid. I suppose there is no magic with Interface which is useless in this case. –  ZigiZ Jan 10 '12 at 20:03

As the name says: Interfaces are the declaration of the interface - not of the implementation. And that is exaclty what tey are for. They give you the possibility to call routines in different classes even if you don't know anything about the class.
And as totaly different classes can implement the same interface, the implementation could be totaly different. So your code mus look like this:

type
  IDoSomething = interface
    ['{EFE0308B-A85D-4DF3-889C-40FBC8FE84D0}']
    procedure DoSomething1;
    procedure WMSize(var Message: TWMSize); 
  end;

  TMyCheckBox = class(TCheckBox, IDoSomething)
  public
    procedure DoSomething1;
    procedure WMSize(var Message: TWMSize); message WM_SIZE;
  end;

  TMyRadioButton = class(TRadioButton, IDoSomething) 
    procedure DoSomething1;
    procedure WMSize(var Message: TWMSize); message WM_SIZE;
  end;

implementation

procedure TMyCheckBox.DoSomething1; 
begin
  // do the same thing for TMyCheckBox and TRadioButton
end;

procedure TMyCheckBox.WMSize(var Message: TWMSize);
begin
  // handle this message the same as with TMyCheckBox and TRadioButton
end;

procedure TMyRadioButton.DoSomething1; 
begin
  // do the same thing for TMyCheckBox and TRadioButton
end;

procedure TMyRadioButton.WMSize(var Message: TWMSize);
begin
  // handle this message the same as with TMyCheckBox and TRadioButton
end;
share|improve this answer
    
OK, but what if the implementation is identical? I could do the same without using an Interface. –  ZigiZ Jan 10 '12 at 16:39
1  
Interfaces do not have implementations of their own. If two classes implement the same interface, and the implementation is identical in both classes, then either derive both classes from a common base class that contains the common implementation, or else move the common implementation into a standalone function that both classes can call when needed. –  Remy Lebeau Jan 10 '12 at 17:35
    
This code is bogus, you cannot compile it. Please, refer to my answer. –  menjaraz Jan 10 '12 at 17:46

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