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I'm having some trouble with this code. I am trying to write a function that allows a user to input a string (of multiple words) and then returns the 1st word. A simple task with Python but C++ baffels me yet again. I'm part way there and realize I need to still add the implementation for 1st token but in incremental debugging I've run into some snags. Questions I'm after are:

  1. Why, when I enter integers, does the function print those on the console? Shouldn't entering ints cause the cin stream to fail and therefore repromt the user for another entry?
  2. How can I get the window to pause (maybe waiting for an "enter" from the user) before returning? It prints and returns so fast it's hard to see what it does.

Here's the code:

/*
* Problem 1: "Extract First String"
* Takes a user string and extracts first token (first token can be a whole word)
*/

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>

using namespace std;

void ExtractFirstToken();

int main()
{
    ExtractFirstToken();
    return 0;
}

/*
* Trying to create a function that will allow a user to enter a string of words and
* then return the first word
*/
void ExtractFirstToken()
{
    cout << "Please enter a string (can be multiple words): ";
    string stringIn;
    while (true)
    {
        cin >> stringIn;
        if (!cin.fail()) break;
        cin.clear();
        cout << "not a string, please try again: ";
    }
    cout << stringIn;
}
share|improve this question
    
try using std::getline() instead: cplusplus.com/reference/string/getline – Chris Card Jan 10 '12 at 15:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. because a string is perfectly capable of holding "12345". Why would it fail?

  2. I'd say something like std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(),'\n'); (heh, amusing that my answer is exactly like Benjamin Lindley's, right down to using numeric_limits and streamsize)

This will wait for input until you hit enter.

share|improve this answer
    
Thought strings could hold numbers. Don't know what I was thinking. I was verifying that and then got caught up/distracted by the combination of things not working. Thanks for the code...a little past where I'm at although I'll look up what it's doing. The std::'s still throw me. Thanks for the input. – MCP Jan 10 '12 at 18:57

1) No. Numbers are perfectly valid as strings.

First write a function that determines if a string is a word, by your definition. Something like this:

bool IsWord(const std::string & str)
{
    return str.find_first_of("0123456789 \t\n") == std::string::npos;
}

Then:

std::string word;
while(std::cin >> word)
{
    if (IsWord(word)) break;
    cout << "not a word, please try again: ";

}
std::cout << word;

2) Just run your program from the command line.

share|improve this answer

You got a lot of answers for the first part, so I'll help with the second:

system("pause");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! I'll try that. – MCP Jan 10 '12 at 18:58

All printable characters are valid string elements, including digits. So if you want digits to be interpreted as invalid input, you'll have to do the work yourself. For example:

if (stringIn.find_first_of("0123456789") != stringIn.npos)
    cout << "not a valid string, please try again: ";
share|improve this answer

Here's the standard formatted I/O idiom:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string line;

    std::cout << "Please enter some text: ";
    while (std::getline(std::cin, line))
    {
        std::istringstream iss(line); 
        std::string word;

        if (iss >> word)
        {
            std::cout << "You said, '" << line << "'. The first word is '" << word << "'.\n";
            std::cout << "Please enter some more text, or Ctrl-D to quit: ";
        }
        else
        {
             // error, skipping
        }
    }
}

You cannot fail to read a string other than through reaching the end of the input stream, which the user has to signal with Ctrl-D or something like that (Ctrl-Z on MS-DOS). You could add another break condition, e.g. if the trimmed, downcased input string was equal to "q" or so.

The inner loop uses a string stream to tokenize the line. Typically you would process each token (e.g. convert to numbers?), but here we just need one, namely the first word.

share|improve this answer
    
This gets the first line, not the first word. – ildjarn Jan 10 '12 at 15:38
    
@ildjarn: Oh OK, fixed. Thanks! – Kerrek SB Jan 10 '12 at 15:41

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