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Whenever this code runs, I get a 'No Peer Certificate' error.

SSL certificate is valid, bought from Namecheap (PositiveSSL). It has the CA crt before it, and opens fine in the Android browser.

HTTP server: nginx

Code:

public void postData() {

// Add your data
List<NameValuePair> nameValuePairs = new ArrayList<NameValuePair>(2);

nameValuePairs.add(new BasicNameValuePair("string", "myfirststring"));

try {

   HttpPost post = new HttpPost(new URI("https://example.com/submit"));
    post.setEntity(new UrlEncodedFormEntity(nameValuePairs));

    KeyStore trusted = KeyStore.getInstance("BKS");
    trusted.load(null, "".toCharArray());
    SSLSocketFactory sslf = new SSLSocketFactory(trusted);
    sslf.setHostnameVerifier(SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);

    SchemeRegistry schemeRegistry = new SchemeRegistry();
    schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme ("https", sslf, 443));
    SingleClientConnManager cm = new SingleClientConnManager(post.getParams(),
            schemeRegistry);

    HttpClient client = new DefaultHttpClient(cm, post.getParams());

    // Execute HTTP Post Request
    @SuppressWarnings("unused")
    HttpResponse result = client.execute(post);

} catch (ClientProtocolException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    Log.e(TAG,e.getMessage());
    Log.e(TAG,e.toString());
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IOException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    Log.e(TAG,e.getMessage());
    Log.e(TAG,e.toString());
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (URISyntaxException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    Log.e(TAG,e.getMessage());
    Log.e(TAG,e.toString());
    e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (KeyStoreException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        Log.e(TAG,e.getMessage());
        Log.e(TAG,e.toString());
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        Log.e(TAG,e.getMessage());
        Log.e(TAG,e.toString());
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (CertificateException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
        Log.e(TAG,e.toString());
        Log.e(TAG,e.getMessage());
    } catch (KeyManagementException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        Log.e(TAG,e.getMessage());
        Log.e(TAG,e.toString());
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (UnrecoverableKeyException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        Log.e(TAG,e.getMessage());
        Log.e(TAG,e.toString());
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Adb logcat:

01-10 15:44:34.872: E/myfirstapp(572): No peer certificate
01-10 15:44:34.872: E/myfirstapp(572): javax.net.ssl.SSLPeerUnverifiedException: No peer certificate
01-10 15:44:34.883: W/System.err(572): javax.net.ssl.SSLPeerUnverifiedException: No peer certificate
01-10 15:44:34.883: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.SSLSessionImpl.getPeerCertificates(SSLSessionImpl.java:137)
01-10 15:44:34.883: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.http.conn.ssl.AbstractVerifier.verify(AbstractVerifier.java:93)
01-10 15:44:34.908: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory.createSocket(SSLSocketFactory.java:381)
01-10 15:44:34.908: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.http.impl.conn.DefaultClientConnectionOperator.openConnection(DefaultClientConnectionOperator.java:165)
01-10 15:44:34.908: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.http.impl.conn.AbstractPoolEntry.open(AbstractPoolEntry.java:164)
01-10 15:44:34.914: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.http.impl.conn.AbstractPooledConnAdapter.open(AbstractPooledConnAdapter.java:119)
01-10 15:44:34.914: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.http.impl.client.DefaultRequestDirector.execute(DefaultRequestDirector.java:360)
01-10 15:44:34.914: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.http.impl.client.AbstractHttpClient.execute(AbstractHttpClient.java:555)
01-10 15:44:34.914: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.http.impl.client.AbstractHttpClient.execute(AbstractHttpClient.java:487)
01-10 15:44:34.914: W/System.err(572):  at org.apache.http.impl.client.AbstractHttpClient.execute(AbstractHttpClient.java:465)
01-10 15:44:34.933: W/System.err(572):  at com.giggsey.myfirstapp.myfirstappIntent.postData(myfirstappIntent.java:126)
01-10 15:44:34.933: W/System.err(572):  at com.giggsey.myfirstapp.myfirstappIntent.onReceive(myfirstappIntent.java:77)
01-10 15:44:34.933: W/System.err(572):  at android.app.ActivityThread.handleReceiver(ActivityThread.java:2118)
01-10 15:44:34.945: W/System.err(572):  at android.app.ActivityThread.access$1500(ActivityThread.java:122)
01-10 15:44:34.945: W/System.err(572):  at android.app.ActivityThread$H.handleMessage(ActivityThread.java:1196)
01-10 15:44:34.952: W/System.err(572):  at android.os.Handler.dispatchMessage(Handler.java:99)
01-10 15:44:34.952: W/System.err(572):  at android.os.Looper.loop(Looper.java:137)
01-10 15:44:34.962: W/System.err(572):  at android.app.ActivityThread.main(ActivityThread.java:4340)
01-10 15:44:34.962: W/System.err(572):  at java.lang.reflect.Method.invokeNative(Native Method)
01-10 15:44:34.962: W/System.err(572):  at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:511)
01-10 15:44:34.972: W/System.err(572):  at com.android.internal.os.ZygoteInit$MethodAndArgsCaller.run(ZygoteInit.java:784)
01-10 15:44:34.972: W/System.err(572):  at com.android.internal.os.ZygoteInit.main(ZygoteInit.java:551)
01-10 15:44:34.981: W/System.err(572):  at dalvik.system.NativeStart.main(Native Method)
share|improve this question
1  
Since certificate is valid, can you tried without your own SchemeRegistry, just relying on default android? –  kenota Jan 10 '12 at 15:56
2  
Use this page to test the certificate. I'm pretty sure that you are missing some intermediate certificates. digicert.com/help/index.htm That should let you know if this is a server related issue. Which I think it is. –  blindstuff Jan 10 '12 at 15:57
    
@blindstuff All ticks from that page. –  giggsey Jan 10 '12 at 15:58
1  
I had this problem once, I got all ticks, but the page had a waring that said something like "The server is not sending all required intermediate certificates. Newer browsers will not complain, but some mobile devices will give warnings because this server needs to be sending one more intermediate certificate during SSL handshakes." –  blindstuff Jan 10 '12 at 16:03
    
@kenota That was it. If you want to submit an answer, I'll mark it as the solution. –  giggsey Jan 10 '12 at 16:04

6 Answers 6

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Because certificate is valid you should not use custom SchemeRegistry, you should just rely on default android certificate validation mechanism.

share|improve this answer
2  
Could you please elaborate on this? I can't seem to figure out how to use this default mechanism. –  Janis Peisenieks Feb 1 '12 at 7:47
3  
Can you elaborate more on this for those who don't know the how to code for this default mechanism? –  JPM Jun 15 '12 at 18:14
    
Perfect. Thanks. SO has a char limit for answer wont accept perfect. #sad –  Jayshil Dave Nov 7 '12 at 7:50
7  
Down-voting because the answer provides no info on creating or getting the default SchemeRegistry –  Joseph Earl Jan 7 '13 at 15:47

Even though this question has an accepted answer I thought it worthwhile to answer since I got the same error on an older Android device running 2.3.3:

javax.net.ssl.SSLPeerUnverifiedException: No peer certificate

After reading several different related questions on SO I came to the conclusion that this can happen for two (maybe more?) reasons:

  • Improper installation of an intermediate certificate
  • Incorrect ordering of the certificate chain

In my case it was an incorrect ordering of certificates. As an example I'm posting the cert order from this question with the insightful answer from user bdc. You can get the certificate ordering by doing the following from a terminal:

openssl s_client -connect eu.battle.net:443

(obviously replacing eu.battle.net with your own server). In the case of eu.battle.net at that time the order was:

Certificate chain
 0 s:/C=US/ST=California/L=Irvine/O=Blizzard Entertainment, Inc./CN=*.battle.net
   i:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./CN=Thawte SSL CA
 1 s:/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA
   i:/C=ZA/ST=Western Cape/L=Cape Town/O=Thawte Consulting cc/OU=Certification Services Division/CN=Thawte Premium Server CA/emailAddress=premium-server@thawte.com
 2 s:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./CN=Thawte SSL CA
   i:/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA

While it should have been:

Certificate chain
 0 s:/C=US/ST=California/L=Irvine/O=Blizzard Entertainment, Inc./CN=*.battle.net
   i:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./CN=Thawte SSL CA
 1 s:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./CN=Thawte SSL CA
   i:/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA
 2 s:/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA
   i:/C=ZA/ST=Western Cape/L=Cape Town/O=Thawte Consulting cc/OU=Certification Services Division/CN=Thawte Premium Server CA/emailAddress=premium-server@thawte.com

The rule is that the issuer of cert "n" in the chain should match the subject of cert "n+1".

Once I found the problem it was trivial to change the cert order on the server and things immediately started working on the Android 2.3.3 device. I guess it's good that older Android versions are a bit pesky about cert order, but it was also a nightmare since newer Android versions reorder the certs automatically. Hell, even an old iPhone 3GS worked with certs out of order.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this answer. I had the certificate ordering issue and it was driving me crazy -- apparently SOME versions of android accept certificates in the wrong order, and some don't. –  Ricardo Massaro Jul 5 '13 at 18:14
    
Ditto for me, rapidssl issued certs were backwards, all browsers worked but my app was failing. When I reordered the certs everything worked. Thanks very much! –  mvsjes2 Aug 19 '13 at 4:08
    
Upvoted. I tried many different methods of keytool and bouncycastle trusted keystores but in the end, Android 2.3 simply didn't like not having the intermediate cert in my server's ssl chain. Neither Android Jellybean, Firefox, IE or Chrome complained - only Android 2.3 DefaultHTTPClient. After adding the gd_intermediate.crt, my GB app worked over SSL. See here for details:informationideas.com/news/2011/11/29/… –  wufoo Jan 30 at 15:07

If it is not a Server issue, which in most cases that I have seen this issue it is related to either missing intermediate certs or bad a install of the certs.

Try using the Scheme Registry like this:

SchemeRegistry schReg = new SchemeRegistry();
schReg.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
schReg.register(new Scheme("https",SSLSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 443));
SingleClientConnManager conMgr = new SingleClientConnManager(params,post.getParams());
share|improve this answer
3  
I used mClient = new DefaultHttpClient(); mClient.getConnectionManager().getSchemeRegistry().register(new Scheme("SSLSocketFactory", SSLSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 443)); and it worked. Thanks! –  shkschneider Nov 5 '12 at 17:46
    
@shkschneider, you're my hero! –  sha256 Aug 24 '13 at 16:14
2  
@shkschneider... i also tried this line with my HttpClient but its giving me the same error "No Peer Certificate"... i am sending JSON params with https request... Please help me –  Noman Hamid Sep 10 '13 at 10:59

This white paper may summarize everything you need to know to get your SSL working on Android. Based on my recent experience, the best approach is to get a SSL certificate that Android likes.

share|improve this answer
1  
"the best approach is to get a SSL certificate that Android likes." Unfortunately, the only time that's useful is when you have the luxury of controlling the server side. That's rare. That white paper is definitely useful though. –  James Moore Sep 12 '12 at 18:20

I'm actually trying to diagnose this myself right now, and it appears one thing that may cause this issue is that the server is down or the connection times out.

share|improve this answer

I remove all the Scheme Registry staff and the "No peer Certification error" is solved.

ie.

I remove this code from mine

SchemeRegistry schReg = new SchemeRegistry();
schReg.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
schReg.register(new Scheme("https",SSLSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 443));
SingleClientConnManager conMgr = new SingleClientConnManager(params,post.getParams());

may be you can try remove those from yours.

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