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What would make a field variable become obsolete before entering the destructor upon deletion of the object? I was a looking for an answer for this problem I'm having on this site and came across this: Lifetime of object is over before destructor is called?

Something doesn't add up at all: if I've declared a pointer to SomeClass inside another WrapperClass, when I construct the WrapperClass I need to create a new SomeClass and delete it on destruction of the wrapper. That makes sense and has worked so far. The pointer is still valid and correct well into the destructor otherwise obviously I wouldn't be able to delete it.

Now my problem is that my field members (both an int and a pointer to a SomeClass array) of WrapperClass are garbage when I call the destructor. I've checked the wrapper object just after construction and the data is fine. The wrapper is actually a pointer in another Main class and the problem occurs when I destruct that Main (which destructs the wrapper) but works fine if I just delete the wrapper from another method in Main. My paranoia led me to the above mentioned answer and now I'm totally confused. Anybody care to shed some light on what's really going on here?

EDIT: Node is the SomeClass.

class WrapperException{};
class Wrapper {
private:
    struct Node { /*....*/ };
    int numNodes;
    Node** nodes;
public:
    Wrapper() : numNodes(0) { nodes = new Node*[SIZE]; }
    Wrapper(const Wrapper& other) { throw WrapperException(); }
    Wrapper& operator=(const Wrapper& other) { throw WrapperException(); }
    ~Wrapper() { //calling delete Main gets me here with garbage for numNodes and nodes
        for(int i = 0; i < numNodes; i++)
            delete nodes[i];
        delete nodes;
    }
};

class MainException{};
class Main {
public:
    Main() { wrapper = new Wrapper(); }
    Main(const Main& other) { throw MainException(); }
    Main& operator=(const Main& other) { throw MainException(); }
    ~Main() { delete wrapper; }
private:
    Wrapper* wrapper;
};
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6  
You are not the only one confused. Showing us some code instead of describing it might help (Only relevant parts please). But just a thought: You did not break the rule of three, did you? –  Grizzly Jan 10 '12 at 16:00
    
If you have a non-trivial destructor, did you make sure the resource is initialized in all constructors? Also: code, please. –  wilhelmtell Jan 10 '12 at 16:04
    
@Grizzly I'm not an expert on the rule of 3 but I don't think it even applies in this very simple case does it? –  itchy23 Jan 10 '12 at 16:14
    
Run in a debugger, and set a breakpoint in the Wrapper destructor. Then you will see if it is called twice, which is one of the problems this might be. The other thing it might be is that you somehow uses an illegal pointer, like going one step beyond the end of a list or array. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 10 '12 at 16:16
    
@JoachimPileborg I set a breakpoint at the destructor of Main which goes to the destructor of Wrapper immediately with garbage... –  itchy23 Jan 10 '12 at 16:19

4 Answers 4

You need to use the Standard library to implement this behaviour.

class Wrapper {
private:
    struct Node { /*....*/ };
    int numNodes;
    std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Node>> nodes;
public:
    Wrapper() : numNodes(0) { nodes.resize(SIZE); }
    // No explicit destructor required
    // Correct copy semantics also implemented automatically
};

class Main {
public:
    Main() : wrapper(new Wrapper()) {}
    // Again, no explicit destructor required 
    // Copying banned for move-only class, so compiler tells you
    // if you try to copy it when you can't.
private:
    std::unique_ptr<Wrapper> wrapper;
};

This code is guaranteed to execute correctly. When in C++, if you have used new[], delete or delete[], then immediately refactor your code to remove them, and review three times any use of non-placement new- constructing a unique_ptr is pretty much the only valid case. This is nothing but a common, expected outcome of manual memory management.

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Unfortunately this is homework so STL is a no-go. Now if I can just understand where the copy assignment that is ruining this is happening I can learn to foresee it next time around. –  itchy23 Jan 10 '12 at 16:33
    
@itchy23: If you can't use the STL, then implement something similar and then use that. You cannot create reliable code in C++ without using it's techniques. That's why it's part of the Standard. Also, if you're desperate, then just declare a copy constructor that throws an exception- the stack trace will tell you exactly where the copy came from. –  Puppy Jan 10 '12 at 16:35
    
Good idea with the exception throwing. I'm not aiming for super reliable code for this assignment but you're right... –  itchy23 Jan 10 '12 at 16:39
    
@itch23: Why not declare the copy constructor/assignment op (possibly as private), without defining it, so the compiler/linker will tell where the copy came from. DeadMG: you might mention that your code is C++11 only and so not really practical for a lot of (most?) programmers without modification to rely on boost (which again is not always an option). So it might be premature to declare unique_ptr the only valid case (although I agree in principal). –  Grizzly Jan 10 '12 at 16:56
    
@Grizzly: On MSVC, it will not tell you where the linker error came from. That was my first technique and now I use the exception method. And whilst it is true that my code is C++11 only, the question is tagged C++, not C++03. Being stuck with a C++03-only compiler or no Boost dependency is the kind of thing that you state in the question. –  Puppy Jan 10 '12 at 17:21

Since Grizzly isn't answering, I'll put this out there.

Both your Main class and your Wrapper class need properly implemented copy constructors and assignment operators. See The Rule of 3.

The problem is, if your class ever gets copied(which is easy to happen without you even realizing it), then the pointers get copied. Now you've got two objects pointing to the same place. When one of them goes out of scope, it's destructor gets called, which calls delete on that pointer, and the pointed to object gets destroyed. Then the other object is left with a dangling pointer. When it gets destroyed, it tries to call delete again on that pointer.

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The lifetime of your wrapper object has ended, but the integer and pointer sub-objects as well as the pointee are still alive. When you invoke delete on the pointer, the pointee's lifetime ends, but the pointer still remains alive. The pointer's lifetime ends after your dtor is complete.

Thus, if your members have become corrupted, there is something else afoot.

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My thoughts exactly. This is not the first time I've done something like this so I have no idea what I've done that's so different this time. –  itchy23 Jan 10 '12 at 16:16

Node** nodes;

should be

Node * nodes;

Also the destructor is wrong. It should be:

for(int i = 0; i < numNodes; i++)
    delete nodes[i];
delete [] nodes;

There might be other problems as well as e.g. you haven't created a copy constructor or assignment operator so that might make it so that the copy of an object then deletes the object for you.

EDIT: changed the destructor...

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I'm starting to really think that the rule of 3 is my downfall here... –  itchy23 Jan 10 '12 at 16:22
    
But I want pointers to nodes, not nodes themselves. Edited the code to reflect that in new declaration of array as well. –  itchy23 Jan 10 '12 at 16:22
    
Ah... I see... But you still need to delete the array of pointers though... –  Cpt. Red Jan 10 '12 at 16:27
    
Good point. Forgot to add it. Thanks –  itchy23 Jan 10 '12 at 16:30

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