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Why is it allowed to cast a pointer to a reference?

Why does this compile:

class Bar {};

int main() {
  Bar i;
  Bar *b = &i;
  typedef const Bar& type;
  type t = type(b);
}

G++ (4.5, 4.7 snapshots), Comeau and MSVC all are happy but warn about unused variables.

What does the compiler think it means? Is it UB? Why isn't it an error?

I think it should be an error because I've accidentally made a Bar* into const Bar& without dereferencing or crazy casts. I thought every part of this was completely safe.

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marked as duplicate by Xeo, sbi, ildjarn, ruakh, Robᵩ Jan 10 '12 at 16:50

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please reduce it to minimal code, e.g. remove const from const type t. –  Abyx Jan 10 '12 at 16:34
2  
Maybe you should also write why you think it should be an error? –  ronag Jan 10 '12 at 16:35
    
I get this: warning: dereferencing type-punned pointer will break strict-aliasing rules. And the more appropriate const type t(b); is indeed an error. But you're right, why is this being dereferenced automatically? –  Kerrek SB Jan 10 '12 at 16:35
2  
@ronag: Clearly, you shouldn't be able to initialise a Bar const& from a Bar*. Also the const type shouldn't exist, but I think const gets ignored for type aliases anyway. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 10 '12 at 16:36
1  
@AzzA: And that's a meaningless and unhelpful assertion. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 10 '12 at 16:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A C-style cast tries different C++ cast types in turn:

[C++11: 5.4/5]: The conversions performed by

  • a const_cast (5.2.11),
  • a static_cast (5.2.9),
  • a static_cast followed by a const_cast,
  • a reinterpret_cast (5.2.10), or
  • a reinterpret_cast followed by a `const_cast,

can be performed using the cast notation of explicit type conversion. The same semantic restrictions and behaviors apply, with the exception that in performing a static_cast in the following situations the conversion is valid even if the base class is inaccessible:

  • [..]

And then follows various complex rules that I can't be bothered to parse in detail.

You get the requisite warnings that it's a stupid cast, but since it's what you asked for it's what's attempted.

Compare with:

class Bar {};

int main() {
  Bar *b = 0;
  typedef const Bar& type;
  const type t = static_cast<type>(b);
}

// In function 'int main()':
// Line 6: error: invalid static_cast from type 'Bar*' to type 'const Bar&'
// compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.
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1  
It's not a C style cast though, you can't write double(0) in C –  Flexo Jan 10 '12 at 16:43
2  
@awoodland : The important thing is that (T)v and T(v) are semantically the same, and I'm sure we can agree the former is a cast. –  ildjarn Jan 10 '12 at 16:45
2  
@awoodland: "can be performed using the cast notation of explicit type conversion." double(0) and (double)0 are both "cast notation of explicit type conversion". Both do exactly the same. –  Xeo Jan 10 '12 at 16:46
1  
@ildjarn - it looks like that might be the case, but that's somewhat alarming though: I'd assumed T(v) always had copy constructor semantics, even for primitives - that makes "avoid C-style casts" an order of magnitude harder to spot in code. –  Flexo Jan 10 '12 at 16:47
2  
I wish the language had an explicit stupid_cast<T> for that... –  Kerrek SB Jan 10 '12 at 16:54

Because you are casting to it.

class Bar {};

int main() {
  Bar *b = 0;
  typedef const Bar& type;
  const type t = b;
  (void)t;
}

The example above spits next error:

error: invalid initialization of reference of type 'type {aka const Bar&}' from expression of type 'Bar*'
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2  
That doesn't explain why the cast succeeds. –  sbi Jan 10 '12 at 16:43

It appears that references are castable to pointers. Your expression is essentially,

Bar & r = reinterpret_cast<Bar&>(b);

But in this explicit form, I get two warnings:

warning: casting ‘Bar*’ to ‘Bar&’ does not dereference pointer [enabled by default]
warning: dereferencing type-punned pointer will break strict-aliasing rules [-Wstrict-aliasing]

But this isn't an error, it would seem.

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