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I'm creating a generic interface to work as command pattern:

public interface IGenericComponent<T> where T : IVisitableObject
{
    void Update(T msg);
}

Then, I'll have another class that I'll hold a bunch of implementations of this interface (each one with its own type). There I would have a dictionary to put the list of commands to execute like this:

private Dictionary<MessageType, List<IGenericComponent>> _components;

This generates a compilation error because I don't put the type for the IGenericComponent. I have a thread that calls the Update method and a method to subscribe (inserta an component to the dictionary):

public void Subscribe<T>(MessageType messageType, IGenericComponent<T> component) where T : IVisitableObject, new()
    {
        lock (_monitorDictionary)
        {
            List<IGenericComponent> subscribedList;
            if (_components.TryGetValue(messageType, out subscribedList))
            {
                subscribedList.Add(component);
                IVisitableObject firstUpdate;
                if(_messageBuffer.TryGetValue(messageType, out firstUpdate))
                    component.Update((T)firstUpdate);
            }
            else
            {
                subscribedList = new List<IGenericComponent>();
                subscribedList.Add(component);
                _components[messageType] = subscribedList;
            }
        }
    }

    private void ProcessQueue()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            IVisitableObject msg;
            lock (_monitorQueue)
            {
                msg = _queue.Dequeue();
            }
            List<IGenericComponent> components;
            lock(_monitorDictionary)
            {
                components = _components[msg.MsgType];
            }
            if(components!= null)
            {
                foreach (IGenericComponent genericComponent in components)
                    genericComponent.Update(msg);
            }
        }
    }

This code does not compile... I came from Java programming, and in Java I can ommit the parametrized type when I instantiate the type. So... I would like to know if is it possible to do that in C# so it would assume that its the generic type (IVisitableObject). Or if you know a better way to solve this problem... The way I've solved this is not the way I would like to use. I've removed generics from the interface and used the generic type IVisitableObject as the parameter of Update method. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Java does generics completely different from .NET. In Java, generics are pretty much a bit of metadata and some compiler sugar to check for type safety at compile time, emitting typecasts where necessary ("erasure"). In .NET, however, each generic type is built as its own type at runtime; they are just as if you had written the code with the specific type, which is why they also work for value types and primitives (e.g. a Dictionary<int, double> etc. doesn't box the key or the value). –  Lucero Jan 10 '12 at 18:41
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've used the approach in Jason's answer and it works fine, especially if you can hide the cast from IVisitableObject to T in a base class. But if you want to avoid forcing classes to implement the non-generic interface, you can use this pattern. Store your subscribers as a List<object> and use a helper class (Dispatcher) to send the message.

public interface IVisitableObject { }
public interface IGenericComponent<T> where T : IVisitableObject
{
    void Update(T msg);
}

abstract class Dispatcher
{
    protected Dispatcher() { }

    public abstract void Dispatch(IVisitableObject message, IEnumerable<object> subscribers);


    static Dictionary<Type, Dispatcher> dispatchers = new Dictionary<Type, Dispatcher>();

    static Dispatcher GetDispatcherFor(IVisitableObject message)
    {
        Type type = message.GetType();

        if (!dispatchers.ContainsKey(type))
        {
            Type closedType = typeof(Dispatcher<>).MakeGenericType(message.GetType());
            object dispatcher = Activator.CreateInstance(closedType);
            dispatchers[type] = (Dispatcher)dispatcher;
        }

        return dispatchers[type];
    }
}

class Dispatcher<T> : Dispatcher where T : IVisitableObject
{
    public override void Dispatch(IVisitableObject message, IEnumerable<object> subscribers)
    {
        var msg = (T)message;
        foreach (var subscriber in subscribers.OfType<IGenericComponent<T>>())
        {
            subscriber.Update(msg);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Worked like a charm! Thanks a lot you and @Jason :) –  ACDias Jan 11 '12 at 11:55
    
oh and I should call it this way: Dispatcher.GetDispatcherFor(msg).Dispatch(msg, components); right? –  ACDias Jan 11 '12 at 11:57
    
That's correct. –  default.kramer Jan 11 '12 at 15:38
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The simplest solution is to say

interface IGenericComponent {
    void Update(IVisitableObject msg);
}
interface IGenericComponent<T> : IGenericComponent where T : IVisitableObject {
    void Update(T msg);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Gene C: You're right. –  Jason Jan 10 '12 at 18:36
    
@GeneC it is an interface. –  ACDias Jan 10 '12 at 18:52
    
@Jason the first suggestion is the one that I'm using now, but I would like to use generics if possible. The secong one does not compile –  ACDias Jan 10 '12 at 18:53
    
No, you need to use the two together. –  Jason Jan 10 '12 at 19:01
    
Ohh... sorry, didnt realize that –  ACDias Jan 10 '12 at 19:09
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