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Maybe a silly question, I can read all the properties from list parameter but not the value in the fields of <T>.

This is the structure

    public class TestRecord {
          public string StringTest { get; set; }
          public int IntegerTest { get; set; }
          public DateTime DateTimeTest { get; set; }
    }

The generic method

    public void TestOfT<T>(List<T> pList) where T:class, new() {
        T xt = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));
        foreach (var tp in pList[0].GetType().GetProperties()) {
        // System.Reflection.PropertyInfo pi = xt.GetType().GetProperty("StringTest");
        // object s = pi.GetValue(tp, null) ;  -- failed
            Debug.WriteLine(tp.Name);
            Debug.WriteLine(tp.PropertyType);
            Debug.WriteLine(tp.GetType().Name);
        }
     }

Test code for generic method

    public void TestTCode()  {
        List<TestRecord> rec = new List<TestRecord>();
        rec.Add(new TestRecord() {
             StringTest = "string",
             IntegerTest = 1,
             DateTimeTest = DateTime.Now
        });
        TestOfT<TestRecord>(rec);
    }

Thanks for your help.

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is your question? –  Dennis Traub Jan 10 '12 at 17:27
1  
you say --failed but what exactly failed? is it a compile error? runtime? what? –  John Gardner Jan 10 '12 at 17:30
    
you don't need that xt instance at all, since you're just calling GetType() on it. In fact, you don't need to call GetType() on any instance. You can just say typeof(T).GetProperties(). –  phoog Jan 10 '12 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

the problem is you are reading the value from the new instance (which can be written simply as var xt = new T();.

if you want to get the property of the item you need to pull the value from the instance.

void TestOfT<T>(IEnumerable<T> list) where T: class, new()
{
    var properties = typeof(T).GetProperties();
    foreach (var item in list)
    foreach (var property in properties)
    {
        var name = property.Name;
        var value = property.GetValue(item, null);
        Debug.WriteLine("{0} is {1}", name, value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this help too –  kel Jan 10 '12 at 17:49
public void TestOfT<T>(List<T> pList) where T:class, new() {
    var xt = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));
    foreach (var tp in pList[0].GetType().GetProperties()) {
        Debug.WriteLine(tp.Name);
        Debug.WriteLine(tp.PropertyType);
        Debug.WriteLine(tp.GetType().Name);
        Debug.WriteLine(tp.GetValue(pList[0], null));
    }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like a copy of the code in the question. What's the point? –  Gabe Jan 10 '12 at 17:33
    
Thanks it works :) Saved my day –  kel Jan 10 '12 at 17:41
    
I've added the GetValue() method :) –  ivowiblo Jan 10 '12 at 17:45
    
Now I known my mistake was passing in the tp into GetValue which should be the record. Debug.WriteLine(tp.GetValue(pList[0], null)); instead of Debug.WriteLine(tp.GetValue(tp, null)); –  kel Jan 10 '12 at 17:50
    
Yeah, you should provide the object which you want to get the value from. –  ivowiblo Jan 10 '12 at 17:54

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