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I have a dictionary list and I want to access the 2nd child element without knowing what element it is. For example:

    <dl>
        <dd>
            <div></div>
            <div></div> (select this item - however can be any html element)
       </dd>
       <dd>
            <div></div>
            <div></div> (select this item - however can be any html element)
       </dd>
       <dd>
            <div></div>
            <div></div> (select this item - however can be any html element)
       </dd>
    </dl>

I tried ...

    $('dd').each(function() {
        $(this + ':nth-child(2)').addClass('hover');
    }

I tried this with a series of different number 0-2 trying to find the element. 0 puts the class in all first child html tags. For example:

    <html class="hover">
    <body class="hover">
        <div class="hover"> 

... etc. Not what I want btw. Leading me to believe that $(this) is actually targeting the window and not my individual dd elements.

Anyway if anyone can shed some light I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's no need for a .each() call - most jQuery functions work happily on lists of elements.

Just match all .children() of a <dd> that are the 2nd child of their parent, and add the required class:

$('dd').children(':nth-child(2)').addClass('hover');

working demo at http://jsfiddle.net/alnitak/TETbE/

or (thanks to @ChrisPratt) you can combine the selectors:

$('dd > :nth-child(2)').addClass('hover');
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this worked also. The above answer worked a little better for my implementation however. Thanks again. –  user311166 Jan 10 '12 at 17:34
    
True. But presumably, he simply redacted the code to highlight the point of the question. Otherwise, the most efficient method would actually be $('dd > :nth-child(2)').addClass('hover'); and he probably would've just done that. –  Chris Pratt Jan 10 '12 at 17:35
    
@ChrisPratt true, if the code is redacted and the .each() is doing other stuff too. Strictly speaking your selector needs a > otherwise it'll highlight any descendent that happens to be the second child of its parent. –  Alnitak Jan 10 '12 at 17:36
    
Oh. Right. Good catch. –  Chris Pratt Jan 10 '12 at 17:38
    
That is a good catch because I did notice it doing that as I started to play around with it. –  user311166 Jan 10 '12 at 17:41

The problem is just your syntax. Try:

$('dd').each(function() {
    $(':nth-child(2)', this).addClass('hover');
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this worked. –  user311166 Jan 10 '12 at 17:33

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