Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make a 'select all' style checkbox in jQuery. here is current markup:

<table>
  <thead>
     <tr>
       <th><input class='select-all' type='checkbox' /></th>
        //etc..
     </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><input class='list-select' type='checkbox' /><td>
     //etc..
    </tr>
    //more <tr>s..
  </tbody>
</table>

what's the easiest way to get all of the 'list-select' checkboxes from the click event of the select all checkbox?

$(".select-all").click(function() {

});

There could be more than one of these on the page, so it has to be relative. i.e. I can't just use $(".list-select")

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a quick fiddle example: http://jsfiddle.net/ru3Nv/

At the core is:

$('.select-all').click(function(){
    $(this).parents('table').find('.list-select').prop("checked", $(this).prop("checked"));
});

Note that I'd also recommend adding listeners on the .list_select boxes so that if any of them become unchecked, the select all becomes unchecked, and if all of them are checked individually then the select all becomes checked as well.

share|improve this answer
    
nice. I was not aware of the parents() function. I had tried parent() to do something similar but it will not work that way. Also, good idea on the additional listeners for list-select checks –  GSto Jan 10 '12 at 19:07

If the select all check box is always in the <thead> of the table, then you can use:

$(this).parents('table').find('.list-select').prop('checked', true);
share|improve this answer
    
parents will find all table elements that are ancestors, rather than stopping on the first one. closest is a better choice. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 10 '12 at 17:45
    
You're right, although I don't think the SO is having nested tables, closest more precise, it is more efficient and always returns a single element. –  Mohamed Khamis Jan 10 '12 at 17:52

(Sorry, misread question at first.)

Probably go up to the closest table, then down to the .list-select:

var select = $(this).closest('table').find('.list-select');

(this will be the .select-all that was clicked, because this is inside the event handler.)

closest starts with the element you give it and moves up through the hierarchy to find a match, and stops with the first one it finds. Then find is sort of the opposite, it goes from there to find descendant elements matching the selector.

share|improve this answer

I think you try to achieve this:

$(".select-all").change(function(){
  if($(this).attr("checked")=="checked"){
    $(".list-select").attr("checked","checked");
  }
  else{
    $(".list-select").removeAttr("checked");
  }
});

That gives your .select-all checkbox the functionality to select and de-select all .list-select checkboxes.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.