Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have Amdahl's law that basically states that if your program is 10% sequential you can get a maximum 10x performance boost by parallelizing your application.

Another one is Wadler's law which states that

    In any language design, the total time spent discussing
    a feature in this list is proportional to two raised to
    the power of its position.

        0. Semantics
        1. Syntax
        2. Lexical syntax
        3. Lexical syntax of comments

My question is this: What are the most important (or at least significant / funny but true / sad but true) laws of Computer Science and programming?

I want named laws, and not random theorems, So an answer should look something like

Surname's (law|theorem|conjecture|corollary...)

Please state the law in your answer, and not only a link.

Edit: The name of the law does not need to contain it's inventors surname. But I do want to know who stated (and perhaps proved) the law

share|improve this question
1  
Just a comment to Wadler's law (and because I love nitpicking): Time proportional to a constant value is just constant, so this formulation doesn't make sense ... –  MartinStettner May 19 '09 at 6:54
7  
And the obvious answer is haacked.com/archive/2007/07/17/… . –  Michael Myers May 19 '09 at 15:30
show 7 more comments

closed as not constructive by Andrew Barber May 1 '13 at 1:43

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

51 Answers

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

Arthur C. Clarke, Profiles of The Future, 1961 (Clarke's third law)

The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to go beyond them into the impossible.

Arthur C. Clarke, Technology and the Future (Clarke's second law)

When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.

Arthur C. Clarke, (Clarke's first law)

share|improve this answer
5  
Any sufficiently advanced bug is indistinguishable from a feature. -- Rich Kulawiec –  Bill the Lizard May 20 '09 at 19:14
add comment

Software can only ever be two of the following:

  • fast
  • cheap
  • delivered on time
share|improve this answer
1  
Its called the Project Triangle: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_triangle –  Juliet Nov 11 '09 at 16:26
show 3 more comments

Linear speedup theorem

Given any c > 0 and any Turing machine solving a problem in time f(n), there is another machine that solves the same problem in time cf(n)+n+2.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The Last Responsible Moment for decision making rule:

The key is to make decisions as late as you can responsibly wait because that is the point at which you have the most information on which to base the decision.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Norvig's Law: Any technology that surpasses 50% penetration will never double again (in any number of months).

share|improve this answer
3  
Oh? Man + Woman -> Man + Woman + Baby. –  Loren Pechtel Jun 21 '09 at 21:48
show 3 more comments

There is "Heisenberg uncertainty principle", which in general states:

In quantum physics, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle states that certain pairs of physical properties, like position and momentum, cannot both be known to arbitrary precision.

With translation to software engineering, the application of this principle is a following: You cannot test and debug you own code, since in order to achieve it you must add additional code, therefore you test not the original system.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I like Proebstings Law:

Compiler Advances Double Computing Power Every 18 Years

research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/toddpro/papers/law.htm

share|improve this answer
add comment

Atwood's Law:

Any application that can be written in JavaScript, will eventually be written in JavaScript.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Postel's Law, or the robustness principle:

Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send.

Not as humorous as many other ones mentioned, but quite insightful. It was, aptly, quoted in the computer networking textbook we used at uni. Apprarently this was originally mentioned in RFC-791, "Internet Protocol," by Joe Postel, September 1981.

Differently worded variants abound (see e.g. RFC-793 and RFC-1122); a common one is: "Be conservative in what you do; be liberal in what you accept from others."

share|improve this answer
show 1 more comment

Some less well known ones:

Wheeler's law: "All problems in computer science can be solved by another level of indirection"

Berry’s law. "The best way to go infinitely fast is to produce no code at all" - i.e. If something can be computed once, then do it at compile time.

share|improve this answer
1  
All problems in computer science can be solved by adding another level of indirection... except too many levels of indirection... –  Juliet Nov 11 '09 at 16:27
show 1 more comment

Zimmerman's maxim:

Anything written down in more than one place, is wrong in more than one place.

You will never have two copies of data stay the same, especially if you depend on a human to keep them the same.

share|improve this answer
4  
So basically you're taking credit for the DRY principle? At least you have no problems with excessive modesty :) –  Jonik Jun 21 '09 at 21:08
add comment

Hanlon's razor:

"Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

Or alternatively:

"Do not invoke conspiracy as explanation when ignorance and incompetence will suffice, as conspiracy implies intelligence."

share|improve this answer
add comment

Pareto Law

The Ninety-ninety rule I read is a plagiarism of Pareto Law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareto_principle

share|improve this answer
add comment

The Dilbert and Peter Principles are superceeded (or at least contested) by the Gervais principle:

Sociopaths, in their own best interests, knowingly promote over-performing losers into middle-management, groom under-performing losers into sociopaths, and leave the average bare-minimum-effort losers to fend for themselves.

See The Gervais Principle, Or The Office According to “The Office

share|improve this answer
add comment

Sods Law: (A kin to Murphy)

When it goes wrong (because according to Murphy it will). It will go wrong in the worst possible way.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's another one most programmers forget:

Kerckhoffs' principle of secure cryptography: A cryptosystem should be secure even if everything about the system, except the key, is public knowledge.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Coined this one myself:

AviD's Law of Regulatory Compliance:

"Compliance reduces the risk of the penalties of non-compliance".

share|improve this answer
show 1 more comment

My Ctrl-C & Ctrl-V law for juniors:

If you do not know how to use Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V then you are not a programmer.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Judge Dredd's Law

"I am the Law"

share|improve this answer
2  
That was really funny for some reason –  guns Jun 21 '09 at 21:36
add comment

Not really coined as a law, but I think this quote from Eric Evans Domain-driven design is an important aspect of Brooks "no silver bullets" law:

"One way or another, creating distinctive software comes back to a stable team accumulating specialized knowledge and crunching it into a rich model. No shortcuts. No magic bullets."

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.