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I sometimes write classes which can be converted to- and from- something else, and I'm used to writing it as a non-static convert-to method and a static convert-from method, for example:

class A {
    B toB() {...}
    static A fromB(B b) {...}
}

or

class B {
    void save(File f) {...}
    static B load(File f) {...}
}

I used to think it's a good and simple approach, but lately the static-ness of the conversion-from method has been annoying me, for instance if I want to define an interface for types that can be converted to- and from- B:

interface ConvertableToAndFromB {
    B toB();
    // ?
}

So, is there an elegant way of doing that without having the conversion-from as static, other than migrating to Smalltalk?

EDIT

To clarify, I realize I can add a non-static method in the interface, e.g.:

interface ConvertableToAndFromB {
    B toB();
    void fromB(B b);
}

or, if I want to allow immutable types (thanks Stripling):

interface ConvertableToAndFromB<T implements ConvertibleToAndFromB<T>> {
    B toB();
    T fromB(B b);
}

But that will require me to create a new A before I can even invoke this, as in:

A a = new A();
a.fromB(b);

or (for immutable):

A a = new A();
a = a.fromB(b);

which is what I'm trying to avoid (but will do with no other solution). I just hope there's a nicer way.

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You may like to keep fromB(..) or load(...) type of methods in a separate Factory class, which again can implement its own interface. –  anubhava Jan 10 '12 at 18:54
2  
Why can't you just remove the static keyword from your from methods? –  Garrett Hall Jan 10 '12 at 18:56
1  
@GarrettHall you mean first creating an instance via new and then calling from on it? I don't consider this very elegant, especially when dealing with immutable classes, but I agree it is a valid solution. –  Oak Jan 10 '12 at 19:01
1  
I don't like the idea of "convert from" as an interface method. How would you call it on the destination object if you just have the source object? If you want to say "create from" use a constructor that takes the source object as a parameter. If you need polimorphism use converter objects. –  gpeche Jan 10 '12 at 19:29
1  
@Oak no, it is more an either-or: you implement a constructor or you implement a converter object. If you have a look at Java code out there you will find that most nontrivial libraries/frameworks use some converter facility as it is the most flexible solution in Java. But for simple scenarios, doing ClassA a = new ClassA(b); is just fine. –  gpeche Jan 10 '12 at 19:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Often, a fromB method would be implemented as a copy constructor. E.g.

public class A
{
  public A(B b)
  {
    this.someValue = b.someOtherVariable;
  }
}

Unfortunately this does not help you create an interface to abstract said functionality. Normally, a separate factory could be used, and this factory implement an interface, but this would still not allow you to get around being able to implement the method in your object in a non-static way while avoiding unnecessary instantiation.

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creating a utility helper class might be better because if you think about it, conversation has nothing to do with the object/instance.

for example, when you convert an array to list, you don't do arr.asList(), rather, you use Arrays.asList(arr)

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You should be able to make your interface recursively generic. I believe the syntax is like this:

interface ConvertibleToAndFromB<T implements ConvertibleToAndFromB<T>>{
    B toB();
    T fromB(B b);
}

class A implements ConvertibleToAndFromB<A> {
    B toB() {...}
    A fromB(B b);
}

Making things more strongly typed like this has obvious advantages. However, it does mean that you have to be somewhat aware of the actual type that you want when you call fromB. There are advantages and disadvantages to this approach.

As a side note, making A responsible for generating objects of type A or B violates the Single Responsibility Principle, and I would generally prefer to have a separate Converter class or interface to perform these actions.

Converter<A, B> converter = converterFactory.get<A, B>(A.class, B.class);
B b = converter.from(a);
share|improve this answer
1  
But it still requires me to convert fromB to be non-static, so I need to first create an instance before invoking it. That's the primary thing I'm trying to avoid (see my comment above), though I agree it will work. –  Oak Jan 10 '12 at 19:04
1  
@Oak: Please see my update. The problem you're facing arises because you're trying to use a class as a static factory class for producing instances of itself. Interfaces cannot define static methods, because that would break the whole inheritance model. So you should use a separate class for creating instances. –  StriplingWarrior Jan 10 '12 at 19:08
    
+1 For the sidenote. –  greyfairer Jan 10 '12 at 20:20

In your scenario, I'll do it this way:

interface ConvertableToA {
    A toA() {...}
}


interface ConvertableFromA {
    Object fromA(A a) {...}
}


class MyConvertableClass implements ConvertableToA, ConvertableFromA {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This could in some scenarios even be extended so that ConvertableFromA is generic, taking the type you want to convert to as a generic type argument. That way, you'd get (compile-time) type safety on the returned object. –  Tomas Lycken Jan 10 '12 at 18:56

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