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I have taken a few different approaches at solving this problem, but have never really been happy with the inflexibility of my solutions. I am trying to map an object created in javascript to a container in my html document.

Let me give you an example. Say I have a Phone Number object in javascript:

var PhoneNumber = function(number, type) {
    this.number = number;
    this.type = type;
}

var myPhone = new PhoneNumber('5555555555', 'Home');

And within my html document, I have a series of DIV's which are basically empty containers waiting to be populated by the forementioned object and displayed to the user.

<div id="phoneNumberContainer">
    <div class="row">        
        <div id="number"></div>
        <div id="type"></div>
    </div>
</div>

Now, I want to have a function within my javascript that will automatically take that phone number object and fill the phoneNumberContainer elements with its data. I have multiple types of objects with different parameters so it has to be generic.

Currently I find myself doing a lot of this:

function mapPhoneNumber() {
    var numberContainer = document.getElementById('number');
    numberContainer.innerHTML = myPhone.number;

    var typeContainer = document.getElementById('type');
    typeContainer.innerHTML = myPhone.type;
}

Which of course works just fine, but its calls for writing a lot of the same code over and over again for every single object I want to map. I wish there was a way to do it like this so I could just pass the object and container into a function and it automatically populate the DIV elements based on the object:

function mapPhoneNumber(phoneObject) {
    var phoneContainerChildren = document.getElementById('phoneNumberContainer').childNodes;
    for(x in phoneContainerChildren) {
        phoneContainerChildren[x] = myPhone.number;
    }
}

Of course this is not a working example as the order of the containers are not guaranteed to be the same as the phone number objects, and the children will have other types of nodes beside my divs etc etc. I could put the phone number parameter name in the actual ID of the DIV element and then match it against the object and fill the object when I have a match, but I hate to have to have such specific ID's on my DIV elements that if changed by another designer will completely destroy my javascript.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how I might implement something like this? I am not against jQuery as I do use a lot of it in my solutions.

share|improve this question
1  
Are you having multiple objects with id="phoneNumberContainer", id="number" and id="type"? If so, you can't do that. Change those to classes. A given ID can only be used once per page. –  jfriend00 Jan 10 '12 at 19:11
    
In my html the phoneNumberContainer is essentially a template. I use the id to clone to entire thing, populate it with data and then return it back to the html. I'm more or less concerned with how to automatically fill the children of the container as opposed to manually. –  ryandlf Jan 10 '12 at 19:13
1  
Do you get rid of the conflicting ids after you clone it? See my answer below for how I used classes instead of ids. –  jfriend00 Jan 10 '12 at 19:17
1  
Yes when I clone, I reset the ID. –  ryandlf Jan 10 '12 at 19:21
    
Are you resetting id="number" and id="type" too? There are three Ids in your template, not just one. –  jfriend00 Jan 10 '12 at 19:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not 100 % sure if it's what you're looking for but I think this might be a possible solution:

var DOMable = {
  writeToDOM : function( node ){
    for( var i in this ) if( this.hasOwnProperty( i ) ){
      node.find( "." + i ).text( this[i] );
    }
  }
};
var PhoneNumber = function(number, type) {
  this.number = number;
  this.type = type;
};
PhoneNumber.prototype = DOMable;

var myPhone = new PhoneNumber('5555555555', 'Home');

Then you can call:

myPhone.writeToDOM( jQuery( '#myPhone' ) );

for a HTML structure like:

<div id="myPhone">
  <div class="number">
  </div>
  <div class="type">
  </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Only problem here is it required me to have the class name match exactly to the object parameter. If another designer/developer changes that class name, i'm in trouble. I fear my only option is to tightly integrate the html with the js like that though :( –  ryandlf Jan 10 '12 at 19:25
    
If designers would thoughtlessly replace and delete classes in the HTML.. I nearly know of no site using JavaScript in the whole WWW that would survive... (Besides: simply replace the . in the 4. code line by a # and it will also work for ids instead of classes. –  Matmarbon Jan 10 '12 at 19:43
    
Not that a responsible employee would, but I like to be anal about things :) I do like your solution the best. Accepted! –  ryandlf Jan 10 '12 at 19:47

I use something similar to this in many of my projects.

<div id="container">
    <div class="row">        
        <div class="prop"></div>
        <div class="propValue"></div>
    </div>
</div>

function BindValues(container, prop, propValue)
{
   container.find(".prop").val = prop; 
   container.find(".propValue").val = propValue;
return container;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would still have to pass a property and value for each element of each object which sounds essentially like the same thing i'm already doing, just bound in a function. –  ryandlf Jan 10 '12 at 19:11
    
You could use multiple key value types. Your original method is based on a typed object and will only work with your input phone number. –  FiveTools Jan 10 '12 at 19:19

You can add a method to your phone number object and use classes in your HTML instead of IDs so you can have more than one per page. Then, all your code is attached to the object and you don't have to retype it everytime you want it:

<div id="homePhone" class="phoneNumberContainer">
    <div class="row">        
        <div class="number"></div>
        <div class="type"></div>
    </div>
</div>

var PhoneNumber = function(number, type) {
    this.number = number;
    this.type = type;
}

PhoneNumber.prototype.setHTML(dest) {
    var item = $(dest);
    item.find(".type").html(this.type);
    item.find(".number").html(this.number);
}

var myPhone = new PhoneNumber('5555555555', 'Home');
myPhone.setHTML("#homePhone");

To do this any more automatically would require us knowing more about how phone numbers are created, how the HTML is created and how one can be automatically associated with the other? Do you have a list of PhoneNumber objects that you just want to create a bunch of corresponding HTML? Or does the HTML already exist and you want to fill it?

share|improve this answer
    
I already have this sort of system set up. The problem is I have a lot of different type of objects (Phone Number, Email, Address, City, State etc etc.) and I want to be able to maintain just one function that will map each one of to its respective container. They are all identical objects in how they work, but they do have different parameters. –  ryandlf Jan 10 '12 at 19:21
    
Sorry, but I'm unable to understand what problem you're really trying to solve from what you've described so far. –  jfriend00 Jan 10 '12 at 19:22
    
Rather than having to repeat my mapPhoneNumber function for every object I have, id like to have some sort of mapAnyObject function that I can pass the container and data into and it will automatically populate the divs within the container. This way if I want to change something about how the mapping works or add something to it in the future, I only have to edit one function as opposed to 5, or 10, or 20 different functions that all essentially do the exact same thing. –  ryandlf Jan 10 '12 at 19:30
    
@ryandlf - The way I've implemented it above, you just pass the container to whatever type of object you have and call setHTML() on the object. It will find the appropriate fields in the container (assuming it's the right type of container). All your object types can have their own setHTML() method so you can just call the same method regardless of object type. Each object manages it's own "set" code and you just call the same method regardless of type. –  jfriend00 Jan 10 '12 at 19:34
    
@ryandlf - you could also have each type of object create the appropriate type of container and set it's data into it. Then, no matter what type of object you had, you'd just call the same method (something like createDisplay()) and it would create HTML from a template and populate that HTML. This could all be very OO. It would probably make sense to have a base implementation or a helper function that all types could share to make more code common. But, for using it, you wouldn't have to know what type of object you had. You'd just tell it to create a display of itself. –  jfriend00 Jan 10 '12 at 19:37

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