Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public abstract class GenericTests<T extends Number> {
  protected abstract T getT();      

  @Test public void test1() {
    getT();
  }
}

public class ConcreteTests1 extends GenericTests<Integer> { ... }
public class ConcreteTests2 extends GenericTests<Double> { ... }

No tests are executed at all, both concrete classes are ignored. How do I make it work? (I expect test1() to be executed for both Integer and Double).

I use JUnit 4.8.1.

Update: it appeared that problem is related with maven-surefire-plugin and not JUnit itself. See my answer below.

share|improve this question
    
Do you need to extend TestCase? –  Paul Medcraft Jan 10 '12 at 19:21
2  
Junit4 doesn't require you to extend TestCase but how are you running these? From the command line? From Eclipse? –  jeff Jan 10 '12 at 19:25
1  
Can you include the content of one of the subclasses –  zode64 Jan 10 '12 at 19:35
1  
What is B? surely it should be Number unless you sub-classed a class with 2 classes with the same name, Double and Integer, as a classes in the core library? –  zode64 Jan 10 '12 at 20:05
1  
I would have thought with your rep you have been exposed to the level of pedantry required on this site, obviously not. –  zode64 Jan 10 '12 at 20:25
show 4 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Renamed all my classes to have suffix "Test" and now it works (Concrete1Test, Concrete2Test).

Update:

That's related with default settings of maven-surefire-plugin.

http://maven.apache.org/plugins/maven-surefire-plugin/examples/inclusion-exclusion.html

By default, the Surefire Plugin will automatically include all test classes with the following wildcard patterns:

**/Test*.java - includes all of its subdirectories and all java filenames that start with "Test". **/*Test.java - includes all of its subdirectories and all java filenames that end with "Test". **/*TestCase.java - includes all of its subdirectories and all java filenames that end with "TestCase".

share|improve this answer
2  
This is because the surefire-plugin maven uses to run tests "discovers" tests based on class names. They have to match one of a few accepted patterns, BlahTest being one of them. Here is more information on the default settings and how you can customize them in your config... maven.apache.org/plugins/maven-surefire-plugin/examples/… –  Jesse Webb Jan 10 '12 at 19:51
1  
Yep, this makes sense. The default file names used by the surefire plugin (the maven plugin that executes when you call mvn test) are **/Test*.java, **/*Test.java and **/*TestCase.java. Ref: maven.apache.org/plugins/maven-surefire-plugin/… –  matsev Jan 10 '12 at 19:51
add comment

I tested this in Eclipse, using your skeleton code, and it worked fine:

Base Class:

package stkoverflow;

import org.junit.Test;

public abstract class GenericTests<T> {
    protected abstract T getT();

    @Test
    public void test1() {
        getT();
    }    
}

Subclass:

package stkoverflow;

public class ConcreteTests1 extends GenericTests<Integer> {

    @Override
    protected Integer getT() {
        return null;
    }    
}

Running ConcreteTests1 in Eclipse Junit Runner worked fine. Perhaps the issue is with Maven?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.