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Possible Duplicate:
How do I replace the first instance of a string in .NET?

Let's say I have the string:

string s = "Hello world.";

how can I replace the first o in the word Hello for let's say Foo?

In other words I want to end up with:

"HellFoo world."

I know how to replace all the o's but I want to replace just the first one

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marked as duplicate by Darin Dimitrov, asawyer, Tono Nam, Brian Roach, McKay Jan 10 '12 at 19:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 109 down vote accepted

I think you can use the overload of Regex.Replace to specify the maximum number of times to replace...

var regex = new Regex(Regex.Escape("o"));
var newText = regex.Replace("Hello World", "Foo", 1);
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4  
Just a note: this is dangerous if the string being searched for can be interpreted as a regular expression (For exemple : searching for the string "(meeting" will raise an error because it is interpreted as an incomplete regular expression... – JFTxJ Apr 17 '13 at 13:51
5  
@JFTxJ - Good point! Making use of Regex.Escape on the parameter of your Regex constructor should help there. Edited example accordingly. – Reddog Apr 18 '13 at 3:03
1  
Aaaa! Good point! I didn't know that existed! Thanks, that will be quite usefull! :-) – JFTxJ Apr 25 '13 at 14:09
2  
RegEx seems like a lot of overhead for a simple operation – SAJ14SAJ Jan 30 '14 at 19:36
    
I used this kind of code in a heavy loop, it consumes a lot of CPU and memory. It must be avoided in these kind of loops. – Ali Erdoğan Feb 14 at 12:44
public string ReplaceFirst(string text, string search, string replace)
{
  int pos = text.IndexOf(search);
  if (pos < 0)
  {
    return text;
  }
  return text.Substring(0, pos) + replace + text.Substring(pos + search.Length);
}

here is an Extension Method that could also work as well per VoidKing request

public static class StringExtensionMethods
{
    public static string ReplaceFirst(this string text, string search, string replace)
    {
      int pos = text.IndexOf(search);
      if (pos < 0)
      {
        return text;
      }
      return text.Substring(0, pos) + replace + text.Substring(pos + search.Length);
    }
}
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6  
much better than the regex imho, this is what the regex will eventually do anyway, after skipping overhead. In very long strings with the result very far at the end, the regex impl might be better as it supports streaming the char array, but for small strings, this seems a lot more efficient... – Jaap Aug 6 '13 at 13:57
    
You may have to add "static" to this method. A static method, field, property, or event is callable on a class even when no instance of the class has been created. For me, this made the difference on whether or not I could call this method contained in my .cs file from my .cshtml page using C#.NET WebPages. This is because my class is also static. I, too, prefer this method over the accepted answer. – VoidKing Oct 31 '13 at 19:20
2  
@VoidKing Better still: make it an extension. – Dabblernl Mar 3 '14 at 11:31
3  
This method is better than accepted answer in my opinion. It is much faster (teststed) and a lot "nicer". I'm not saing that regexes are bad, but this is to simple to use regex. Regex adds to much overhead for such simple task. – Hooch Dec 12 '14 at 8:57
2  
This works amazingly well, thanks! – Cornelius May 5 '15 at 20:41

There are a number of ways that you could do this, but the fastest might be to use IndexOf to find the index position of the letter you want to replace and then substring out the text before and after what you want to replace.

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