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In Wikipedia sample and in GoF book, usage of Visitor pattern is started by calling accept method on some acceptor. But why is it this way? Why can't we start calling visit method with desired acceptor as an argument? We can still make visitor behavior depend on 2 types -- of visitor and of acceptor (double dispatch) -- and we can eliminate redundant call (as it seems to me).

Here's sample code to illustrate this:

public interface Visitor {
    void visit(AcceptorA acceptor);
    void visit(AcceptorB acceptor);
}

//
// Visitor which sings
// 
class SingingVisitor implements Visitor {
    public void visit(AcceptorA acceptor) {
        System.out.println("sing A");
    }

    public void visit(AcceptorB acceptor) {
        System.out.println("sing B");
    }
}


//
// Visitor which talks
// 
class TalkingVisitor implements Visitor {
    public void visit(AcceptorA acceptor) {
        System.out.println("talk A");
    }

    public void visit(AcceptorB acceptor) {
        System.out.println("talk B");
    }
}

//
// Acceptor subclasses
// 
class AcceptorA implements BaseAcceptor {
}

class AcceptorB implements BaseAcceptor {
}

//
// Launcher class
// 
class VisitorMain {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Visitor v = new TalkingVisitor();
        AcceptorA a = new AcceptorA();
        AcceptorB b = new AcceptorB();

        v.visit(a);
        v.visit(b);
        v = new SingingVisitor();
        v.visit(a);
        v.visit(b);
    }
}
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It's just an example--nobody said it has to be implemented this way. –  Dave Newton Jan 10 '12 at 19:43
3  
@DaveNewton I've asked this question exactly to find out if am I overlooking some advantage of GoF approach or is it just a convention. –  Victor Sorokin Jan 10 '12 at 19:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Consider:

class House implements HouseAcceptor {
    HouseAcceptor kitchen;
    HouseAcceptor livingRoom;

    void accept(HouseVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
        kitchen.accept(visitor);
        livingRoom.accept(visitor);
    }
}

class Kitchen implements HouseAcceptor {
    void accept(HouseVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
}

class LivingRoom implements HouseAcceptor {
    void accept(HouseVisitor visitor) {
         visitor.visit(this);
    }
}

class SpeakingHouseVisitor implements HouseVisitor {
    void visit(HouseAcceptor acceptor) {
        System.out.println("Inside a HouseAcceptor");
    }

    void visit(House acceptor) {
        System.out.println("Inside a House");
    }

    void visit(Kitchen acceptor) {
        System.out.println("Inside a Kitchen");
    }

    void visit(LivingRoom acceptor) {
        System.out.println("Inside a LivingRoom");
    }
}

...
HouseAcceptor acceptor = new House();
HouseVisitor visitor = new SpeakingHouseVisitor();

...
// Doing it your way
visitor.visit(acceptor);
// Output: Inside a HouseAcceptor

// Doing it the right way
acceptor.accept(visitor);
// Output:
// Inside a House
// Inside a Kitchen
// Inside a LivingRoom

Note that if you do it your way, the runtime type of your acceptor will not make a difference: the static type will be used. By doing double dispatch you ensure that both runtime types are used.

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Using your version, the following will not compile:

List<BaseAcceptor> list = ...
for(BaseAcceptor ba: list)
   vi.visit(ba)

The java compiler cannot determine (statically) what ba will be, so it cannot decide at compile time which visit method to call. You would need to write an additional method:

public void visit(BaseAcceptor ba){
   if(ba instanceof AcceptorA) 
     visit((AcceptorA)ba);
   else if(ba instanceof AcceptorB) 
     visit((AcceptorB)ba);
}

This is not necessary using the visitor pattern.

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If I have "stub" visit(BaseAcceptor) method in Visitor interface, first code will compile. But it still won't give me desired behavior, that's correct. –  Victor Sorokin Mar 11 '12 at 8:40

Because Visitors have no knowledge of how to navigate the private internal fields of a composed Object.

If you called Visitor.visit(something) then it would have to figure out if that something had private fields which needed transversal. To do that, you need that something to accept your Visitor. Once you decide that navigation must be in the visited objects (and not the Visitor), then you realize that you need a call back to the Visitor to tell it what the next element in the navigation path is. Typically that's the accept(...) method; however, if you attempted to make accept(...) just a wrapper to initiate navigation (by delegation to the parameter), then you need a second set of methods to tell the Visitor you're entering X now, your entering Y now.

By using the GOF approach, one can safely subclass an item being visited and modify the visiting path to include or skip additional fields. This would not impact the existing Visitors because their interface would not change. One wouldn't need to recompile subclasses of the Visitor either.

By using your suggested approach, when one added a new type into the hierarchy of to-be-visited items, one would then need to recompile all the visitors, even the visitors had no interest in the new type.

A good compromise would be:

public interface Visitable {
  public void accept(Visitor v);
}

were all your "data hierarchy" implements Visitable, and your Visitor has a "convenience method" like so

public abstract class Visitor {

  public void initiate(Visitable v) {
    v.accept(this);
  }

  public abstract void accept(...);
  public abstract void accept(...);
  public abstract void accept(...);

}

But it's up to you if having an interface is preferable to such a base class. To me I'd favor the more loosely coupled interface, but opinions differ.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 You're describing the Visitor/Composite/Iterator combo. The Visitor pattern is usefull beyond that as well. And your compromise looks more like a triple-dispatch to me Visitor->Visitable->Visitor. –  greyfairer Jan 10 '12 at 20:13
    
@greyfairer, I'm not suggesting triple dispatch. I'm pointing out that the Visitable must call Visitor multiple times, and if you are intent on putting the "initiation" in the Visitor, it becomes a convenience function which is called once. I don't like the solution, but I will illustrate it to hopefully point out the code overhead without added benefit. At least the Visitor->Visitable call only occurs once (but really, why waste the extra stack frame?) –  Edwin Buck Jan 10 '12 at 20:20
    
The Visitor pattern is also useful if you do not have a composite Visitable. In this case the Visitable will call the Visitor only once, but it will call the correct overloaded method. –  greyfairer Jan 10 '12 at 20:28

you have no double dispatch. accept usually takes an abstract visitor as an argument.

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