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I'm wondering if there is a way in java (pure code, not some Eclipse thing) to "syntactic sugar" up repetitive try catch code. Namely, I have to wrap a bunch of functions

public void foo(){
  try{
        // bla
  } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("caught exception:");
            e.printStackTrace();
  }
}

public void bar(){
  try{
        // other bla
  } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("caught exception:");
            e.printStackTrace();
  }
}

and so on. I'd like to write

@excepted public void foo(){
// bla
}

@excepted public void bar(){
// other bla
}

I think sugar of this type was possible in python. Is it possible in Java?

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3  
Catching and just dumping out an exception to stdout is generally a poor idea. Instead, either don't catch the exception (leaving it to calling code) or handle it as appropriate. There's no real abstraction available for "handle it as appropriate" as it varies depending on the contents of "bla". –  T.J. Crowder Jan 10 '12 at 19:48
    
If you're not going to do anything specific to handle an uncaught exception, you can wrap the entire program in a single try/catch –  Matthew Jan 10 '12 at 19:49
    
Catching a general Exception is usually a poor idea, too, unless you're writing framework code of some sort. –  Rob Hruska Jan 10 '12 at 19:49
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't do something like your pseudocode suggests with annotations, but you can make the method(s) throw:

public void bar() throws Exception {}

And just let it bubble up all the way, catching it wherever you want to, higher up the call tree (or down the call stack, if you prefer).

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1  
I'd give this a +1 if it weren't throwing Exception, but rather, more specific types of exceptions. I realize that the OP's question dealt with Exception, but I don't think we should encourage it. Think of the poor chap that has to code to this interface. S/he's got to catch and handle a general Exception now, too. –  Rob Hruska Jan 10 '12 at 19:52
    
For the record, I don't agree with it at all; I prefer specific types of Exception, too, if they must be declared to be thrown. All our Exceptions are RuntimeException, so there is no need to declare (but they should be documented for the API's sake!!!) –  sarumont Jan 10 '12 at 19:55
    
Well, declaring private methods as throws Exception, while not exactly elegant, does not seem bad to me. –  gpeche Jan 10 '12 at 20:26
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Wrap up the try/catch in a class/method that accepts an interface. Pass an anonymous implementation to that class/method. Really only good when the exception handling is involved, otherwise similarly noisy.

You could also play AOP/bytecode games, depending on actual use case.

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For the first part of your question, in Java 7 there's new syntactic sugar for catching repetitive exception, take a look at this article.

For the second part of your question, I'm afraid there's no such thing in Java.

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My suggest is either declare you methods with throws Exception or catch and rethrow them as RuntimeExceptions.

Just catching and printing Exceptions is a bad idea in pratice because you are continuing to execute despite having done nothing to recover from the Exception. Even if your code continues to run fine, soon you will have a log file filled with hundreds of exceptions and it will become nearly worthless for debugging and finding useful information in.

try {
   ...
} catch (Exception e) {
   System.out.println("caught exception:");
   e.printStackTrace();
}
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For the sake of this answer, I will assume that

  1. you are given a class Base with a whole bunch of non-final methods that throw Exceptions.
  2. you are supposed to prepare a class Extends that extends Base but changes the behavior of some methods to log exceptions rather than throw them.
  3. you have access to the source code of Base and can make modifications.

You could write an annotation processor. Put an annotation on Base class that tells the processor to make the Extension class. Then on some methods, put an annotation telling the processor to log exceptions instead of throwing them.

This may be more work (writing and debugging the processor) than it saves, depending on your circumstances.

You may also be able to achieve the desired result by writing an InvocationHandler and using Proxy.

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