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This post is the continuation of my previous post. Now I have a code that I'd like to compile. The only difference is that now I'm using lists of my own class List<Row> instead of List<Integer[]>. In particular look at hashCode in Row, because it provides a compilation error.

    public class Row {
          private String key;
          private Integer[] values;

          public Row(String k,Integer[] v) {
              this.key = k;
              this.values = v;
          }

          public String getKey() {
              return this.key;
          }

          public Integer[] getValues() {
              return this.values;
          }

          @Override
          public boolean equals(Object obj) {
              if(this == obj)
                  return true;
              if((obj == null) || (obj.getClass() != this.getClass()))
                  return false;
              // object must be Row at this point
              Row row = (Row)obj;
                  return ((key == row.key) && (values == row.values));
          }

          @Override
          public int hashCode () { // HERE I HAVE A PROBLEM. DON'T KNOW HOW TO IMPLEMENT IT
              return this.key;
          }

    }

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Row> allRows = new ArrayList<Row>();
        allRows.add(new Row("0",new Integer[]{1,2,3}));
        allRows.add(new Row("0",new Integer[]{1,2,2}));
        allRows.add(new Row("1",new Integer[]{1,2,3}));
        allRows.add(new Row("2",new Integer[]{1,1,1}));
        allRows.add(new Row("2",new Integer[]{1,1,1}));

List<Row> selectedRows = new ArrayList<Row>();
            selectedRows.add(new Row("0",new Integer[]{1,2,3}));
            selectedRows.add(new Row("2",new Integer[]{1,1,1}));

    System.out.println(allRows);
    System.out.println(selectedRows);
        List<Row> refreshedRows = refreshRows(allRows,selectedRows);
        System.out.println(refreshedRows);

    }

    private static List<Row> refreshRows(List<Row> allRows,List<Row> selectedRows) {
        Set<Row> set1 = new HashSet<Row>();
        Iterator<Row> it = allRows.iterator(); 

        while(it.hasNext()) {
            Row curr = it.next();
            if (!set1.add(curr) && selectedRows.contains(curr)) {
                it.remove();
            }
        }
        return allRows;
    }
}

The result, i.e. refreshedArray, should be equal to:

key = "0", values = {1,2,3}
key = "0", values = {1,2,2};
key = "1", values = {1,2,3};
key = "2", values = {1,1,1};
share|improve this question
    
If the solution provided on your previous post has to work on the Rows then the equality of your Rows should only depend on the values field. I think you didn't exactly reflect your situation in that post. If you need to include key as a basis of equality of Rows, then I think you need a different approach to solve your issue. – Bhesh Gurung Jan 10 '12 at 20:16
    
yes, I need to take into account both key and values... – Klausos Klausos Jan 10 '12 at 20:30
1  
key = "0", values = {1,2,3}, key = "1", values = {1,2,3}. Suppose, you original list has those two Rows. Those are not really two duplicate Rows considering both key and values. But should the solution remove one of those based on the same values even if they keys are different? – Bhesh Gurung Jan 10 '12 at 20:40
    
@βнɛƨн Ǥʋяʋиɢ: No, if the keys are different then the solution should not remove the entries even if the values are the same. The entries are considered as duplicate only if both the keys and values are the same. – Klausos Klausos Jan 10 '12 at 21:00
    
In that case it should work, see the answer below for the equals and hashCode methods. Give it a try. – Bhesh Gurung Jan 10 '12 at 21:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try with the following. Despite minor changes, most of the code is generated by Netbeans IDE 7.0:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj) {
        return true;
    }
    if (obj == null) {
        return false;
    }
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass()) {
        return false;
    }
    final Row other = (Row) obj;
    if ((this.key == null) ? (other.key != null) : !this.key.equals(other.key)) {
        return false;
    }
    if (!java.util.Arrays.deepEquals(this.values, other.values)) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    int hash = 3;
    hash = 79 * hash + (this.key != null ? this.key.hashCode() : 0);
    hash = 79 * hash + java.util.Arrays.deepHashCode(this.values);
    return hash;
}
share|improve this answer

Look at the signature for hashcode(). It returns a primitive integer. You are returning key which is of type String. Try something like this:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    int hash = 1;
    hash = hash * 31 + key.hashCode();
    //hash = hash * 31 + otherFields.hashCode() etc
    return hash;
}

which your IDE can even generate for you. You should probably read up on hashcodes. Your equals method looks wrong too. What is meant by comparing the two Integer arrays for equality?

share|improve this answer
1  
What's the point of all this math? Why not just return key.hashCode()? – JB Nizet Jan 10 '12 at 20:07
    
But my class Row has two fields, such as String key and Integer[] values. Both of them are used in the function 'equal'. So, what will be the hashCode for this case? – Klausos Klausos Jan 10 '12 at 20:22
    
@JB - yeah he could. If he has other fields a formula like the one my IDE generated might be useful. – Amir Afghani Jan 10 '12 at 20:32

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