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For some sizing project, I need to find out the byte size of the results returned by all distinct SQL queries executed in an Oracle db. Any suggestions?

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1 Answer 1

  1. What constitutes a "distinct SQL query"? If I have a SQL statement

    SELECT ename
    FROM emp
    WHERE empno = :1
    

    which is executed 1000 times with 1000 different bind variable values, does that count as 1 distinct SQL query? Or 1000? If that same query was executed 200 times with the same bind variable value, does that count as 1 distinct SQL query? Or 200?

  2. Are you counting recursive SQL? SQL generated by background processes and jobs?

  3. What are you attempting to size that would depend on the total size of the results returned from all SQL statements. That doesn't seem like a sensible metric. Since we're talking about a database hosting company, are you sure that they're not looking for reasonable metrics like how much CPU you're using, how much I/O you're doing, how much RAM you're consuming, how much data you're transferring over the network, etc.?

I cannot fathom, for example, how you would possibly handle capacity planning for a database knowing that query 1 returns 10 bytes of data on average per execution. It makes far more sense to ask how much work that query has to do to produce its results, how much of the data has to be sent over the network, etc. And it makes far more sense to get aggregate data (say, CPU usage during the peak snapshot interval) rather than trying to get data for each SQL statement.

If you really wanted to, assuming you're licensed to use the AWR, I suppose you could query DBA_HIST_SQLSTAT to compute the average number of fetches per execution for a given SQL_ID, get the text from DBA_HIST_SQLTEXT to get the text of the SQL statement, write a bit of code using DBMS_SQL to parse the query and describe the results to determine the maximum size of a single row of the result and multiply by the average number of rows fetched per execution to get the number of bytes fetched per execution for each distinct SQL statement. That's a pretty hefty amount of effort for some metrics that don't seem particularly useful but it's definitely possible.

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which is executed 1000 times with 1000 different bind variable values, does that count as 1 distinct SQL query? Or 1000? If that same query was executed 200 times with the same bind variable value, does that count as 1 distinct SQL query? Or 200? –  Venu Jan 10 '12 at 21:29
    
@Venu - Sorry, I'm not sure I understand. It looks like you copied some of the questions that I'm asking you. But I don't see any answers. –  Justin Cave Jan 10 '12 at 21:33
    
a) This counts as 1 query b) No c) This is required by a service that we are planning to use. This service will do its capacity planning based on this. –  Venu Jan 10 '12 at 21:35
    
@Venu - So, in both cases, regardless of the number of executions and the number of different bind variable values, it counts as a single distinct SQL statement? If the query returns 0 bytes for some bind variable values and 1 GB for other bind variable values, what byte size do you want? What sort of service are we talking about? If you're talking about a database hosting service, perhaps they really want the total amount of data being sent over the network to and from the database (which is a completely different question than what you asked)? –  Justin Cave Jan 10 '12 at 21:40
    
Yeah, I'm counting it as one SQL statement. Yeah, you are right in pointing out that byte size might be different depending upon the bind variables. My assumption is that the result-set would not be not very different for valid scenarios. I can take an avg size and use that . Yeah its a in-house DB hosting service, where they want to use this data to see what can be the peak load and volume on an hourly basis. I was hoping that there is some v$* table where oracle stores this kinds of info and I can query it for getting the byte size. Thank you. –  Venu Jan 10 '12 at 22:35

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