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I'm trying to get access to sendRawPdu method of SMSDispatcher. I'm able to get method, but I can't invoke it because I have to have instance of SMSDispatcher to call mSendRawPdu.invoke( /* ??? */ , pdus.encodedScAddress, pdus.encodedMessage, null, null );

Invoking the method from SmsManager works great, because I can get an object like this SmsManager sm = SmsManager.getDefault(); and pass it to .invoke

try {

    @SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
    Class c = Class.forName("com.android.internal.telephony.SMSDispatcher");
    Method[] ms = c.getDeclaredMethods();

    // List all methods
    for (int i = 0; i < ms.length; i++) {
        Log.d("ListMethos",ms[i].toString());
    }

    // Get method "sendRawPdu"
    byte[] bb = new byte[1];   
    Method mSendRawPdu = c.getDeclaredMethod("sendRawPdu",bb.getClass(),bb.getClass(), PendingIntent.class, PendingIntent.class);
    Log.d("success","success getting sendRawPdu");
    mSendRawPdu.setAccessible(true);   

    // How to invoke the method not having object of type SMSDispatcher?
    mSendRawPdu.invoke( /* ??? */ , pdus.encodedScAddress, pdus.encodedMessage, null, null );



} catch (SecurityException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (InstantiationException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}

Does this task has a possible solution?

share|improve this question
1  
Only if the method is static, in which case you can pass a null for object. –  Bhesh Gurung Jan 10 '12 at 20:46
    
I've looked the source code and it is not static protected void sendRawPdu(byte[] smsc, byte[] pdu, PendingIntent sentIntent, PendingIntent deliveryIntent). Passing a null doesn't work, I've checked it before. So you say there are no other options? –  mlatu Jan 10 '12 at 20:51
    
What would calling an instance method without an instance do? By definition, there has to be an instance. –  Dave Newton Jan 10 '12 at 21:09
    
Dave, ok, I agree. Do you know if there is some workaround to "reflect" or get instance of this SMSDispatcher? –  mlatu Jan 11 '12 at 12:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See the doc for Method#invoke(java.lang.Object, java.lang.Object...)

If the underlying method is an instance method, it is invoked using dynamic method lookup as documented in The Java Language Specification, Second Edition, section 15.12.4.4; in particular, overriding based on the runtime type of the target object will occur.

Throws:
NullPointerException - if the specified object is null and the method is an instance method.

So, basically if you pass a null to invoke an instance method then you receive a NPE. Which means it's not possible to invoke an instance method without an object. Which makes sense because why would you want to invoke an instance-method without an instance.

e.g.

class MyClass {
    public void myMethod() {
        System.out.println("Hello Java Reflection!!!");
    }
}

Method theMethod = MyClass.class.getDeclaredMethod("myMethod");
System.out.println(theMethod);
theMethod.setAccessible(true);
theMethod.invoke(null);

It throws a NPE, but prints "Hello Java Reflection!!!" if I make the method static.

share|improve this answer
    
Clear answer. If you'll find out a workaround please let me know. –  mlatu Jan 11 '12 at 12:47

SMSDispatcher is an abstract class, so you can't get an instance of it.

public abstract class SMSDispatcher extends Handler {...}

Try to use others.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you even let us know what others can be used..? –  NREZ Aug 27 '13 at 6:52

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