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Apart from database operation, how can I simplify or improve my code with LINQ ?

Example To search in a string

 string search = "search in list";
    IEnumerable<string> results = myList.Where(s => s == search);
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closed as not constructive by Steven, stema, Book Of Zeus, Robert Harvey Jan 12 '12 at 3:38

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2  
What is your question? –  SLaks Jan 10 '12 at 21:05
1  
@SLaks Good question. –  loyalpenguin Jan 10 '12 at 21:07
1  
Didn't you just answer your own question with that example? –  Steven Jan 10 '12 at 21:10
    
@SLaks As I am completely new in LINQ, I thought to ask a question how good developers like you take benefit of LINQ while coding. I just put an example which I randomly find on internet –  Zerotoinfinite Jan 10 '12 at 21:13
1  
Keep in mind you rarely improve performance with LINQ. On the contrary! LINQ may simplify how your code looks and is read (by humans), but in my experience code is slowed down considerably when you use LINQ instead of traditional loops. –  Pedery Jan 10 '12 at 23:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I often use LINQ statements in for loops. As a simple example instead of:

for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
{
    if (array[i] > 10)
    {
        ...
    }
}

I might do this:

foreach(var value in array.Where(item => item > 10))
{
    ...
}

I frequently find myself needing to get the first occurrence of a value in a list:

var first = orders.FirstOrDefault(order => order.Items.Count > 1);
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Don't use count when your just looking for the existence of an Item. Any() will short circuit the call when the first row is found. Count will Iterate though all items. Therefore Any() is more efficient. –  John Hartsock Jan 19 '12 at 20:56

With something this simple why not just see if it exists..

myList.Any(s => s == search) //which would return a boolean.
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