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I am trying to work out a way of changing the belongs_to, has_many relationship from doing a normal and expected (see below) behaviour on both...

'SELECT `transactions`.* FROM `transactions` WHERE `transactions`.`account_id` = 2'

to

'SELECT `transactions`.* FROM `transactions` WHERE `transactions`.`account_id` = 2' OR `transactions`.`transfer_id` = 3'

Current Setup...

class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :transactions
end

class Transaction < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :account
end

class CreateTransactions < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :transactions do |t|
      t.string        :name,
      t.references    :account,
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

Attempted Solution...

class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :transactions, :class_name => "Transaction", :finder_sql => ->(record) do
    record = self if(record.nil?)
    "SELECT * FROM transactions WHERE transactions.account_id = #{record.id} OR transactions.transfer_id = #{record.id}"
  end
end

class Transaction < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :transfer, :class_name => "Account", :foreign_key => 'transfer_id'
end

class CreateTransactions < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :transactions do |t|
      t.string        :name,
      t.references    :account,
      t.integer       :transfer_id,
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

The question is, how do I change the default WHERE to include an OR. Adding a scope or addition to the has_many without using the foreign_key seems to produce...

'SELECT transactions.* FROM transactions WHERE transactions.account_id = 2' (AND transactions.transfer_id = 3')

In fact, all my attempts using rails conventional ways seem to produce the above.

The importance of working out how to change the default relationship is in order to ensure that all select statement looking for an account_id also look at the transfer_id.

Your help would be greatly appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sorry, but I don't believe has_many supports what you are looking for. By convention, an association is expected to reference all of the keys given. In your case, you are trying to reference one of several keys.

The simplest solution is to create 2 separate associations, and then merge them where needed:

class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :transactions # this will use the 'account_id' field by convention
  has_many :transfer_transactions, :class_name => "Transaction", :foreign_key => :transfer_id
  def all_transactions
    (transactions + transfer_transactions).uniq
  end
end

The downside here is that you are making 2 database calls, and the #all_transactions method won't be available as a nested association.

Another possibility is to revise your schema and create 2 transaction entries per physical transaction, with the debit/credit direction flagged. This is more in line with double entry accounting anyhow:

class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :transactions

  def credit_transactions
    transactions.credit
  end

  def debit_transactions
    transactions.debit
  end
end

class Transaction < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :account
  # add some validation to make sure you set the debit/credit flag

  scope :credit, where(:credit => true)
  scope :debit, where(:credit => false)

  # some virtual accessors for 'debit'
  def debit=(direction)
    credit = !direction
  end
  def debit?
    !credit?
  end
end

class CreateTransactions < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :transactions do |t|
      t.string        :name
      t.references    :account
      t.boolean :credit, :nil => false
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

Another option you may want to look into, is the 'Squeel' gem. It's basically a ruby DSL for SQL, and allows all sorts of complex queries. I'm not sure if it will work in a has_many declaration, however.

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