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I have an input text file which I am reading and storing everything in a list. After that I'm splitting the list according to the specific text occurence in the list.

Here is the function.

import re
def readFile1(file1):
    f = file1.read().split('\n')
    #print f
    ctrlList1 = []
    mfcList1 = []

    for str in f:
        if re.search("MegaMon> mfc",str):
            print "splitting\n"
            break
        else:
            ctrlList1.append(str)

    print ctrlList1, "\n\n\n"

This works fine and saves ctrlList1 until the text megamon> mfc appears in the main list. But I want to save the lines after MegaMon> mfc in mfcList1. I am not able to do that.

I tried:

if not re.search("MegaMon> mfc", str):
   print "splitting\n"
   continue
else:
    mfcList1.append(str)

but this doesn't seem to be working. I need to save the text file in two different lists. Any help would be appreciated.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

how about

 import re
 mfcList1, ctrlList1 = [],[]
 # read the whole file as a list of lines - its easier
 with open(file1, 'r') as f1:
     lines = f1.readlines()

 # for each line, search for your string. 
 # If you have found MegaMon append one mfcList1, else append ctrlList1
 foundMegaMon = False
 for line in lines:
     if re.search("MegaMon> mfc",line):
          foundMegaMon = True
     if foundMegaMon:
          mfcList1.append(line)
     else:
          ctrlList1.append(line)
share|improve this answer
    
I can use readlines() but it is actually printing \n with each list element.. that's why i used read and added split('\n') Is there any work around for this?? Btw I tried and it works.. thanks –  user1050485 Jan 10 '12 at 21:53
    
the \n is actually part of the line which is why you see it line.strip() will get rid of it for you - so ..append(line.strip()) –  danodonovan Jan 10 '12 at 22:20
    
I was able to do that.. thank u –  user1050485 Jan 10 '12 at 22:36

How about:

 for index, str in enumerate(f):
        if re.search("MegaMon> mfc",str):
            print "splitting\n"
            mfcList1=f[ index + 1 : ]
            break
        else:
            ctrlList1.append(str)

you may have to change the index in [ index + 1 : ] (writing out of my head), but in general should work.

Basically this uses enumerate to get the index of the current element in the "for" loop and when splitting point is reached assigns the rest of "f" list to "mfcList1" list.

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yes I think i should have tried it.. i will check and see today if this also works.. thanks for the input –  user1050485 Jan 12 '12 at 18:46
    
you're welcome :) Good luck! –  kgr Jan 13 '12 at 14:46

Other solutions seem fine. This one seems a bit more elegant:

ctrlList1=[]
mfcList1=[]
curlist = ctrlList1                   # Initially, append to ctrlList1
for line in file1:
    str = line.rstrip("\n")           # Remove trailing newlines

    if re.search("MegaMon> mfc",str):
        print "splitting\n"
        curlist = mfcList1            # From now on, append to mfcList1
        continue
    curlist.append(str)

print ctrlList1, "\n\n\n"
print mfclList1, "\n\n\n"
share|improve this answer
    
hii .. yes i had tried this but it is storing one half for this condition but for other condition it is storing the whole file.. –  user1050485 Jan 12 '12 at 18:45
import re

def split_file(filename, boundary='MegaMon> mfc'):
    """Takes a filename and a delimiter, and returns two lists: 
       the lines before the delimiter and the lines after it.
    """
    pre, post = [], [] # before boundary, after boundary
    passed_boundary = False
    with open(filename) as f:
        for line in f:
            line = line.rstrip('\n')
            if not passed_boundary and re.search(boundary, line):
                passed_boundary = True

            if passed_boundary:
                post.append(line)
            else:
                pre.append(line)
    return pre, post

This is substantively similar to the other answers, but it is wrapped up in a function. It has the following nice properties:

  1. It processes the file a line at a time instead of reading it all in at once
  2. It doesn't do the regex test on every line after the boundary, so it will be faster.
  3. The code is a bit more generic so it could be used to do the same thing to files with different boundary strings (i.e. something other than "MegaMon> mfc").
share|improve this answer

I think I finally resorted to this solution and it works:

def readFile1(file1):
     f = file1.readlines()
     ctrlList1 = []
     mfcList1 = []
     mfc = False

    for line in f:
         if re.search("MegaMon> mfc", line):
             mfc = True

         if re.findall('\n', line):
             v = re.sub('\n', '', line)

         if mfc:
             mfcList1.append(v)
         else:
             ctrlList1.append(v)

Thank for the other answers as well. I will try them out.

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