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I know I can create a generic method that I can call from other methods similar to the following, but it seems like a waste to have a seperate method when all I want to do is have a variable within a method be defined as generic:

private List<T> OrderedEntityList<T>(IRepository<T> repository) where T : Entity, IOrderedEntity
{
  return repository.All().OrderBy(x => x.DisplayOrder).ToList();
}

public SomeMethod()
{
  entityList = OrderedEntityList(_memberRepository);
  foreach (var entityRecord in entityList)
  {
    //... do work ...
  }
}

What I want is to do something like the following, where I can pass in the name of the repository as a parameter, but as it is, this doesn't compile.

public SomeMethod(string repositoryName)
{
  List<T> entityList where T : Entity, IOrderedEntity = repository<T>.All().OrderBy(x => x.DisplayOrder).ToList();

  foreach (var entityRecord in entityList)
  {
    //... do work ...
  }
}

Any thoughts on how do to this?

--- EDIT ---

Thanks all for the quick feedback. Looks like I need to provide some additional information. Basically I renamed my method to make it easier for an example, but in reality, what I am trying to do is have a generic action in an MVC controller that can be used to display a list of entities (that all inherit from Entity and IOrderedEntity) which might include members, statuses, roles, etc. I am trying to make my MVC controller actions reusable regardless of the type of underlying repository (as long as each implements the same interface). Here's my actual List method in my controller that I am trying to make "generic".

public ActionResult List(string entity)
{
  //TODO: Find out how to declare this as a generic list instead of tying it to MemberStatus
  List<MemberStatus> entityList; 
  EntityIndexViewModel<OrderedEntityViewModel> indexViewModel;

  //TODO: Possibly move this switch statement to an EntityFactory (once I find out how...)
  switch (entity)
  {
    case "Status":
      indexViewModel = new EntityIndexViewModel<OrderedEntityViewModel>();
      //TODO: This is another line that I think is a waste to have as seperate method... but maybe I'm wrong
      entityList = OrderedEntityList(_memberStatusRepository);
      ViewBag.EntityName = "Member Statuses";
      break;
    default:
      throw new Exception("Entity is not valid");
  }

  foreach (var entityRecord in entityList)
  {
    var viewModel = new OrderedEntityViewModel();
    viewModel.Id = entityRecord.Id;
    viewModel.Name = entityRecord.Name;
    viewModel.DisplayOrder = entityRecord.DisplayOrder;
    viewModel.HasChildRecordsAssigned = _memberRepository.All().Any(m => m.StatusId == entityRecord.Id);
    indexViewModel.EntityList.Add(viewModel);
  }
  return View("List", indexViewModel);
}
share|improve this question
1  
You don't even use repositoryName in the second function?? –  m-y Jan 10 '12 at 21:25
    
Where does the T in repository<T>.All() come from? –  phoog Jan 10 '12 at 21:25
    
In your code, how does T get resolved to an actual class? There needs to be some way that the CLR can work out what class T should be. Also why is breaking out a method a "waste"? C# code typically has squillions of methods - one more won't hurt. –  cbp Jan 10 '12 at 21:26
    
It looks to me as if you don't need generics here at all. If you are sure your repository returns entities and that they are IOrderedEntity then you can just cast whatever is returned by your repository. Its hard to know exactly what the code would look like as you are not using your repositoryName parameter. How do you intend to know what type and which repository is being used to return your entities? –  Mike Hanrahan Jan 10 '12 at 21:27
    
@Mike et. al., see my edit above and let me know if that makes more sense for what I am looking for. –  bigmac Jan 10 '12 at 21:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

public SomeMethod<T>(string repositoryName) where T : Entity, IOrderedEntity
{
    List<T> entityList = repository<T>.All().OrderBy(x => x.DisplayOrder).ToList();

    foreach (var entityRecord in entityList)
    {
        //... do work ...
    }
}

But depending on the rest of your code, maybe what you really want is to take advantage of generic type variance in C# 4.0.

share|improve this answer
    
Matthew, thanks for the quick feedback. see my edit above with my actual code. Can I use your sample to make a MVC controller action implement a generic interface? –  bigmac Jan 10 '12 at 21:39
    
@bmccleary: Based on your edit, I feel like what you really want to do is take advantage of generic type variance. See the link in my answer. Basically you want a List<ISomeInterface>, where ISomeInterface contains all the members that you need (perhaps IOrderedEntity--do you really need the type to inherit from both Entiy and IOrderedEntity?). If you really do need to inherit from both, my sample code might be your best bet. –  Matthew Jan 10 '12 at 21:54
    
Got it figured out. Thanks Matthew. –  bigmac Jan 11 '12 at 1:40

You can either define what T is in the class or the method signature:

public class MyClass<T> where T : Entity, IOrderEntity
{
    public SomeMethod(string repositoryName)
    {
        ...
    }
}

OR

public SomeMethod<T>(string repositoryName) where T : Entity, IOrderEntity
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the quick response. As I mentioned in my edit above, knowing that my method is actually an MVC controller action, will this still work? –  bigmac Jan 10 '12 at 21:40

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