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I have an array (M) of matrices. I perform an operation on the matrix in the ith position, and it adds three more matrices to my array in the (3i-1), (3i) and (3i+1)th positions. I want to continue this process until I reach the jth position in the array, where j is such that all matrices in the (j+1)th position and onwards have appeared already somewhere between positions 1 and j (inclusive).

EDIT: I've been asked to clarify what I mean. I am unable to write code that makes my algorithm terminate when I want it to as explained above. If I knew a proper way of searching through an array of matrices to check if a given matrix is contained, then I could do it. I tried the following:

done = 0;    

ii = 1

    while done ~= 1

    %operation on matrix in ith position omitted, but this is where it goes

        for jj = ii+1:numel(M)

                for kk = 1:ii
                    if M{jj} == M{kk};
                        done = done + 1/(numel(M) - ii);
                        break
                    end
                end
        end

            if done ~= 1
                done = 0;
            end

    ii = ii + 1

    end

The problem I have with this (as I'm sure you can see) is that if the process goes on for too long, rounding errors stop ever allowing done = 1, and the algorithm doesn't terminate. I tried getting round this by introducing thresholds, something like

while abs(done - 1) > thresh

and

if abs(done - 1) > thresh
    done = 0;
end

This makes the algorithm work more often, but I don't have a 'one size fits all' threshold that I could use (the process could continue for arbitrarily many steps), so it still ends up breaking.

What can I do to fix this?

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
I don't quite see how the content of the the question relates to the question title. What is it you're asking please? Also, can you provide M to make your code properly reproducible. Finally, if you have nested loops like that in MATLAB, it usually means you are doing something wrong. I suggest you clarify your real objective so we can find a better way of writing your code. – Richie Cotton Jan 10 '12 at 22:00
    
Thanks for your response. I've edited my post now to make my question clearer; I think you'll find it does relate to the title. I fail to see what you mean by "wrong". My aim is to write an algorithm that gives me the output I want it to in an acceptable amount of time. I'm new to programming, but most other algorithms I have written use nested loops and work perfectly well. – Matt Lab Jan 10 '12 at 22:08
    
I too don't see how the title correlates with what you're asking. It would be better if you change it to something more relevant such as "loop not terminating correctly" or something. It will also help you since interested people will actually read your true question based on the title. – Jorge Jan 11 '12 at 1:03
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Why don't you initialize done at 0, keep your while done==0 loop, and instead of computing done as a sum of elements, check if your condition (finding if the matrix already exists) is verified for all jj, something like this:

alldone=zeros(numel(M)-ii,1);

for jj = ii+1:numel(M)

        for kk = 1:ii
            if isequal(M{jj},M{kk})
                alldone(jj-ii) = 1
                break
            end
        end
end
done=prod(alldone);

There is probably a more elegant way to code this, though. For instance, you could add early termination:

while done==0
done=1;
for jj = ii+1:numel(M)
    match_success=0;
    for kk = 1:ii
        if isequal(M{jj},M{kk})
            match_success=1;
            break
        end
    end
    if match_success==0
        done=0;
        break;
    end
end
end

At the beginning of each loop, the algorithm assumes it is going to succeed and stop there (hence the done=1). Then for each jj, we create a match_success which will be set to 1 only if a match is found for M{jj}. If the match is found, we break and go to the next j. If no match if found for j, match_success is left to 0, done is initialized to 0 and the while loop continues. I haven't checked it, but I think it should work.

This is just a simple tweak, but again, more thought can probably speed up this whole code a lot.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Although I can see why this is better, it still isn't working in some cases. I added in a "disp(alldone)", and each loop churned out all but one 1. Could there be a floating point error or something with isequal? – Matt Lab Jan 10 '12 at 22:34
1  
Can you look at the two matrices matlab decides are not equal, but should be? Are they actually the same? If they are just approximately the same, but in theory the same (for instance if matlab makes a small error in computing each, and this results in non-equality), you should be able to replace this check by a tolerance-based one (like norm(M{jj}-M{kk})< some small value). – Theo Jan 10 '12 at 22:58
    
Just to add to Richie's comment above, is that you will probably find that Matlab is a fairly slow language unless you can avoid nested loops and parallelize your code (i.e. matrix or array wise operations) as much as possible. Sometimes it is not clear how to do so, but just something to keep in mind when you think your code is too slow. – Theo Jan 10 '12 at 23:02
    
Now that I've investigated it, I think it is just running too slowly for some inputs. Blergh, back to the drawing board. Thanks a lot for your help – Matt Lab Jan 10 '12 at 23:20

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