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When using jquery, I have frequently made use of $(this) within events, functions, etc.

Recently I tried the following:

function btn_edit_click (event) {
    alert(event.data.idnum);
}
$(".btn_edit").on("click", { idnum: $(this).attr("title") }, btn_edit_click);

For some reason I get the title of the entire PAGE, rather than the element(s) being referenced by $(".btn_edit"). Am I doing something wrong, or is this expected behaviour?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well it depends what this code is nested within. If the answer is nothing then this refers to the window object.

If you were referring to this inside an event handler then this would refer to the element on which the event triggered. But it appears as though you are using this in the global space.

If you want the title of the .btn_edit element to be accessible in the callback function just refer to this in your callback function (notice how it simplifies your code as well):

function btn_edit_click (event) {
    alert(this.title);
    //UPDATE: I changed $(this).attr('title') to this.title because it performs much faster
}
$(".btn_edit").on("click", btn_edit_click);

Here is a demo: http://jsfiddle.net/gRK3z/

Also here is a performance test to show the difference between using .attr('title') and .title: http://jsperf.com/jquery-attr-title-vs-title

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I like this solution, however, does the 2nd alert make sense anymore since you aren't passing the data object? –  Kevin B Jan 10 '12 at 22:03
    
@KevinB Thanks for the input, I think my edit crossed your comment somewhere over the Mid-West... –  Jasper Jan 10 '12 at 22:04
    
this seems simplest...I didn't realize that when you don't declare the function inline, you can still refer to "this"...I also didn't realize that this.title is faster :P...thanks –  Irfan jamal Jan 11 '12 at 15:08

$(this) is being called within the global scope here, not within a callback method. So yes, you should expect to get the window or document object back with $(this).

A better solution might be:

<script type="text/javascript">
function btn_edit_click (event) {
    alert(event.data.idnum);
}

$('.btn_edit').each(function(k, el)
{
    $(el).on('click', { idnum: $(el).attr('title') }, btn_edit_click);
});
</script>
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ah...makes sense...i just removed the "data" and changed the function to: function () { btn_edit_click($(this).attr("title")) } –  Irfan jamal Jan 10 '12 at 22:02
    
That should also work. –  Jim Rubenstein Jan 10 '12 at 22:09
1  
A better practise would be ditching the .each() and use the .on() already on the element. –  MarkSmits Jan 10 '12 at 22:23

The context of this is not what you expect it to be, as others have pointed out. I think this is a less convoluted and more readable way of doing what it is you are trying to do:

$("#parentDiv").delegate(".btn_edit", "click", function (e) {
    btn_edit_click(this.title);
});
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1  
+1 for this.title instead of $(this).attr("title"). –  Dennis Jan 10 '12 at 22:04

In your case you are passing an object to the on function, so this is whatever it is in the scope you're in.

Unless set, this is usually set to window.

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As you are creating an object to pass data across it is not in the scope of the selector. Instead you could simply pass the name of your function to be executed in the handler.

this in your function would then relate to the element as specified in your selector, saving the need for you to pass the object in the first place:

function btn_edit_click (event) {
    alert($(this).attr("title"));
}
$(".btn_edit").on("click", btn_edit_click);

Example fiddle

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