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Let's say I have a class:

class NumberCollection
{
public:
    typedef std::set<int> SetType;
    typedef SetType::iterator iterator;
    void insert(int n);

    iterator begin();
    iterator end();
    size_t size() const;

    iterator difficultBegin();
    iterator difficultEnd();
    size_t difficultSize() const;    

private:
    SetType easySet_, difficultSet_;
}

Where insert() adds an element to easySet_. difficultSet_'s members change depending on the members of easySet_.

The problem I am having is that, multiple insertions means that difficultSet_ is constantly recalculated. So I want difficultSet_ to be calculated lazily (i.e., only when difficultBegin(), difficultEnd(), or difficultSize() are called). The problem is, then I actually have to make difficultSet_ into a mutable because otherwise difficultSize() cannot operate on it.

So now my class declaration looks like

class NumberCollection
{
public:
    typedef std::set<int> SetType;
    typedef SetType::iterator iterator;
    void insert(int n);

    iterator begin();
    iterator end();
    size_t size() const;

    iterator difficultBegin();
    iterator difficultEnd();
    size_t difficultSize() const;    

private:
    SetType easySet_; 
    mutable SetType difficultSet_;
    mutable bool upToDate_;
}

I feel like this is bad design though. Is there a better way?

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Why do you declare difficultSize() method with const keyword? Is there a special reason for this? –  Wacek May 19 '09 at 5:51
    
@Wacek: Because it should be possible for a method that takes a NumberCollection const& parameter to call difficultSize() (I presume). But you're right, you could "downgrade" that method to non-const to make the fact that it could update the cached representation more explicit. –  j_random_hacker May 19 '09 at 5:55
    
There are cases where I do need to call difficultSize() on a const reference, and logically, checking the size does not change the object. –  rlbond May 19 '09 at 6:04
1  
if you're working with const objects you might want to add const versions of the iterator functions, that return const_iterators. –  wilhelmtell May 19 '09 at 6:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

That's totally the way to do it. Const can mean binary const, or it can mean conceptually const. Using mutable means you're doing the later, which is fine.

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+1. I believe "mutable" was added to the language to address precisely this case -- of caching "logically const" values. –  j_random_hacker May 19 '09 at 5:53
    
You are right in C++98. In C++11, you may consider to synchronize the access to the mutable data. For more details, see my answer. –  Philipp Claßen Jan 4 '13 at 0:11

To help understand why to use mutable, we can explore other options.

You can solve the same problem using const_cast:

size_t NumberCollection::difficultSize() const
{
     if(!upToDate_)
     {
          NumberCollection& nonConst = const_cast<NumberCollection&>(*this);
          nonConst.difficultSet_ = PerformExpensiveCalculationFunction();
          nonConst.upToDate_ = true;
     }
     // etc....
}

Having offered this solution, I'll say that it's inferior to using mutable. If a member is marked as mutable, then simply by looking at the header I can gather how you are treating it. I don't get this information if you use const_cast.

But then somebody might take the other side of the debate, and say that it's better not to expose implementation details in the header.

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+1. Yes, there's always n sides to every story :) –  j_random_hacker May 22 '09 at 3:16

This is essentially the reason C++ has the mutable construct. Alan De Smet's rant about the misuse of mutable shows the kinds of situations in which mutable should not be used.

In this case, difficultSize() does not change what the NumberCollection represents - which is suitable for marking as const. It does how ever need to change the internals at times, which is why you need to mark difficultSet_ and upToDate_ as mutable.

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+1, nice link. –  j_random_hacker May 22 '09 at 3:19

Your solution is fine in C++98. Note that in C++11 you should consider to synchronize the access to your mutable data. Otherwise you may run into problems when you your class is used by the STL, which assumes that all const member functions are thread-safe.

For further details, see Does const mean thread-safe in C++11?

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