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I tried searching for the last several days and only found a few directions to go in, not really any solutions.

I can do some scripting and can learn enough of any language to fine tune this idea.

My situation: From a USB drive, I want a single script that can run on any os, determine which os is running, and then execute an os specific executable/script.

I would like to be able to run this natively without installing additional software on each machine, as I will be using this on many different computers and may not have internet or other access to install/update software.

I have started looking into running a portable version of python, but seeing as I already have os independent scripts (bash/batch/sh/applescripts), I didnt know, and cant find, if there is an easier way to do this without the overhead of a portable interpreter.

Thanks for any help.

-mike

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1 Answer 1

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Sounds like a chicken-or-the-egg kind of thing, doesn't it?

If you're on a PC, you at least have a standard boot format.

If you're guaranteed a Java JRE on any platform, I would argue that Java might be your best bet.

Q: Is there any language interpeter (Java, Perl, Python or bash) that you're guaranteed to have on any host you'd want to run this USB stick on?

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the only guaranteed interpreters are those I can use in a portable format loaded and referenced from the usb drive itself. Thats why i was thinking portable python. but i dont know if it was necessary because the only reason i really need this script is to do a basic: check OS: if OS = windows run ./scripts/windows.bat if OS = MAC run /scripts/mac.app etc. –  mike Jan 11 '12 at 0:17
    
Think about it. Supposing you had a "portable python" on your USB stick. The Python script is portable. But it needs an interpreter to run. You'll need one interpreter for Windows, a different interpreter for Linux, and so on. Hence the "chicken/egg" reference :) –  paulsm4 Jan 11 '12 at 5:04
    
thanks for your input.. my original understanding was wrong and this cleared it up. –  mike Jan 11 '12 at 21:10

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