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Example:

template <typename T, typename U>
struct A {
    void Print() {}
};

template <>
void A<int, float>::Print() {} // Okay                   

template <typename T>
void A<T, char>::Print() {} // Will produce error

Question:

I know that you have to define the class template partial specialization in the above code for it to work and I also know from the standard that The members of the class template partial specialization are unrelated to the members of the primary template (§ 14.5.5.3). However, why the difference in syntax between a explication specialization and a partial specialization?

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2 Answers 2

You cannot specialize function templates partially, only fully.

The first instance makes use of the fact that member functions of class templates are themselves function templates, and thus the restriction applies to them.

When you partially-specialize the class template, you have an entirely new class template, which you have to define anew.

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1  
"functions of class templates are themselves function templates" - Member functions of class templates defined outside of the class are defined like function templates. But are they really equivalent? –  Jesse Good Jan 11 '12 at 1:28
    
@Jesse no they are not equivalent. There is no term to describe the "templatiness" of member functions of class templates. They are not function templates. Some people call them "temploid". The corresponding issue is open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_active.html#1253 –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 11 '12 at 6:12
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb: Thanks for the clarification. Hopefully the description for the active issue is added soon. –  Jesse Good Jan 11 '12 at 6:58
template <typename T>
void A<T, char>::Print() {} // Will produce error

You are:

  1. re-defining a function (it has already been defined when declared void Print() {}, you see there are {}.
  2. with a template argument list that doesn't match the declaration: template <typename T, typename U> void Print()

In fact, even if you haven't defined the function when declared it, you will still have an error since your declaration and definition do not match, the compiler will not be able to find a definition for the original template, or a declaration for the specialized template.

A specialized template function for a function that is related to a struct must have a specialized struct as well, This code works:

template <typename T, typename U>
struct A {
    void Print() {}
};

template <>
void A<int, float>::Print() {} // Okay                   


template <typename T>
struct A<T,char>
{
    void Print();
};

template <typename T>
void A<T,char>::Print() {}

Because template function has been declared in it's template struct.

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Im not sure about this explanation. Here is a quote from the standard: The definitions of members of the primary template are never used as definitions for members of a class template partial specialization. –  Jesse Good Jan 11 '12 at 2:35
    
I don't see any opposition between the quote and the explanation, what's the point you have? –  Tamer Shlash Jan 11 '12 at 2:47
1  
You mentioned re-defining, but a class template specialization is a distinct template unrelated to the primary template, so no redefining is involved. When the compiler sees A<T, char> it expects a specialized definition. Did you try compiling it and see the errors? Even if you do not define the function when you declare it, the same errors occur (although I realize I shouldnt trust what the errors tell me always.) –  Jesse Good Jan 11 '12 at 2:57

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