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I have made a template class for a node in a linked list and I'm trying to have it output its contents to an output stream by overloading <<. However my current code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
template<class NType> class Node;

template<class NType>
class Node {
private:
        void deletePointer(NType* p);
public:
        NType data;
        Node *prev, *next;

        template<typename T>
        struct is_pointer { static const bool value = false; };

        template<typename T>
        struct is_pointer<T*> { static const bool value = true; };

        Node();
        Node(NType data);
        ~Node();
};  

int main() {
        Node<int> *n1 = new Node<int>();
        Node<int> *n2 = new Node<int>(10);

        std::cout << "Node 1: " << n1 << std::endl;
        std::cout << "Node 2: " << n2 << std::endl;
}

template<class NType> inline std::ostream & operator << (std::ostream& out, const Node<NType> &node){
        out << node.data;
        return out;
}

template<class NType> inline Node<NType>::Node()
            :data(NULL), prev(NULL), next(NULL)
{
}

template<class NType> inline Node<NType>::Node(NType data)
            :data(data), prev(NULL), next(NULL)
{
}

template<class NType> inline Node<NType>::~Node(){
        if(is_pointer<NType>::value){
                deletePointer(&data);
        } else {
                return;
        }
}

template<class NType> inline void Node<NType>::deletePointer(NType* p){
    delete p;
}

Outputs memory locations rather than the data within the nodes. This happens with primitive types such as int and the like as if it didn't know what kind of data was in the NType container.

Node 1: 0x741010
Node 2: 0x741030
Node 3: 0x741070
Node 4: 0x741090

I've tried using typename rather than class but still no dice... Is there any way to dynamically find out what type the template is using and cast or something prior to insertion? I know I can make a ton of redundant code for all the primitives but that seems wasteful and unnecessary.

If it helps any, I'm compiling on Arch Linux x64 with GCC v4.6.2 20111223

Edit: Since a lot of people are mentioning it. I've also tried putting the class outside as a friend and as a stand alone function neither of which work because the stream outputs address rather than the data itself regardless of where I put it. There are no private data values to be accessed so it's OK for it to not be a friend.

Edit: Test case: http://ideone.com/a99u5 Also updated source above.

Edit: Added the remaining portion of my code to assist Aaron in his understanding of the code.

share|improve this question
1  
The way you've done it requires SomeNode << cout which is clearly not what you meant. ostream& operator<< should conventionally always be a free function because you want the ostream on the LHS. Fixing that won't solve your problem necessarily, but... – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 '12 at 2:30
    
Produce a testcase, please. ideone.com – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 '12 at 2:32
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your code declares the operator<< as a member function, so it would actually take the this pointer as first argument and ostream as second. Instead it needs to be a free function:

template<class NType> class Node {
public:
    NType data;
    Node *prev, *next;
};
//Note how this is declared outside of the class body, so it is a free function instead of a memberfunction
template<class NType> inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Node<NType>& val){
    out << val.data;
    return out;
}

however if your operator<< needs access to private data you need to declare it as a friend function instead:

template<class NType> class Node {
public:
    NType data;
    Node *prev, *next;
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Node& val){
        out << val.data;
        return out;
    }
};

Now for your output: If your operator<< was invoked the compiler would know the type of NType and do the right thing when streaming the data member. However since your operator<< should not have worked (as written) and it seems to give you memoryaddresses as output I would assume you have something like the following:

Node* n = new Node();
std::cout<<n;
//When it should be:
std::cout<<*n;

Now just for curiosity sake: Why are you implementing what looks curiously like a linked list yourself instead of simply using std::list?

Edit: Now that we can see the testcase it seems the assumptions about how the operator<< was called was correct. The output needs to be changed to:

std::cout << "Node 1: " << *n1 << std::endl;
std::cout << "Node 2: " << *n2 << std::endl;

to actually invoke the operator<< for Node, instead of the generic one for T*

share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware there are multiple renditions of a linked list on the interwebs and in the standard libraries but I was just trying to put this so I can control how it functions for the sake of my personal understanding of my own data structure. – TechWiz Jan 11 '12 at 2:54
    
... Wow such a silly mistake... I feel like such a novice haha. Thank you kindly. – TechWiz Jan 11 '12 at 3:00
1  
@TechWiz: Don't hold that feeling dear, it'll come back to you soon enough again. ;) – Xeo Jan 11 '12 at 3:22
template <class NType>
class Node
{
  public:
    NType data;
    Node *prev, *next;
};

template <class NType>
inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Node<NType>& n)
{
    return out << n.data;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've tried that previously (and again once you re-mentioned it just in case), but same deal. – TechWiz Jan 11 '12 at 2:29

Why are you adding a template<class NType> in front of your already templated class method?

Generally, the best way of overloading operator<< is to make it a friend:

template<typename NType>
friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Node<NType>& node)
{
    out << node.data;
    return out; 
}

Edit: To respond to the comment below, this is what I mean:

When you define a class template in the header, you don't redeclare that template for the member functions of the class:

template<typename T>
class Foo
{
    T some_data;

    void member_fn();
}

This is required when you're declaring a non-member friend function, however:

template<typename NType>
class Node 
{
public:

    NType data;
    Node<NType> *prev, *next;

    //Note the different template parameter!
    template<typename NType1>
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Node<NType1>& node);
};

Implementation of that then becomes the above template<typename NType> std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Node<NType>& node) implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't follow. You also put template<typename NType> infront of your class? Also this returns addresses as well. Am I missing something else here? – TechWiz Jan 11 '12 at 2:32
    
Sorry, I got a little sloppy with my copy and pasting. The function was declared in the class definition and defined outside of the class. But for the sake of brevity I moved it into the class. That was clearly a stupid idea as it created more confusion that it should have it seems. – TechWiz Jan 11 '12 at 2:59

You're printing the node addresses, not the nodes:

int main() {
        Node<int> *n1 = new Node<int>();
        Node<int> *n2 = new Node<int>(10);

        std::cout << "Node 1: " << n1 << std::endl;
        std::cout << "Node 2: " << n2 << std::endl;
}

n1 and n2 are pointers, not objects. You should have written:

int main() {
        Node<int> *n1 = new Node<int>();
        Node<int> *n2 = new Node<int>(10);

        std::cout << "Node 1: " << *n1 << std::endl;
        std::cout << "Node 2: " << *n2 << std::endl;
}

or:

int main() {
        Node<int> n1();
        Node<int> n2(10);

        std::cout << "Node 1: " << n1 << std::endl;
        std::cout << "Node 2: " << n2 << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yea that was the problem thank you. Dang Java tryna instill terrible habits in me. – TechWiz Jan 11 '12 at 3:03

Others have pointed out that you need to use cout << *n1 instead of cout << n1, but there is another important bug in your code.

Your destructor includes a call deletePointer(&data); where data is a member of the class. This is dangerous. If this line of code ever was executed, then the program would probably crash. data is just one small part of the object pointed at by this, trying to delete it is like trying to delete a single element in an array is ints.

Node<int> *n1 = new Node<int>();
delete n1; // this makes sense. deleting the same thing that was new'ed

Node<int> *n1 = new Node<int>();
delete &(n1->data); // BUG

You should probably change your design a lot and simply remove the special code for pointer. Do you expect to write code like: Node<int*> *n2 = new Node<int*>( new int ); ? And if so, how do you want it to behave?

If NType actually was a pointer type, like int*, then it might make sense to do deletePointer(data), but it'll never make sense to do deletePointer(&data).

share|improve this answer
    
The deconstructor checks for pointer data before calling deletePointer, so if data is not a pointer, the deconstructor will not call the function. Also telling delete to delete a member variable from outside of its own deconstruction code seems like something that should bug regardless of if it were properly constructed code or not. That just seems like bad programming. The deconstructor is also not supposed to be called directly but should be part of garbage collection when the program closes AND these nodes are part of something larger so its just not even meant to be used that way. – TechWiz Jan 11 '12 at 23:28
    
@TechWiz, that's not correct, sorry. Let's be clear. Even if data is a pointer type, then it should be deleted with delete data, not with delete &data. – Aaron McDaid Jan 12 '12 at 0:08
    
Also @TechWiz, this is C++, not Java. You said "... but should be part of garbage collection". – Aaron McDaid Jan 12 '12 at 0:10
    
is_pointer<NType>::value will be true if and only if X is a pointer type. For, example is NType is int * then it is a pointer type. Further, if NType is int *, then data will be declared as int * data; As a result, you will need to call delete data to delete the int pointed at by data. – Aaron McDaid Jan 12 '12 at 0:29
    
I'm sorry you are wrong. It works just fine, try it for yourself. The program neither crashes not creates a memory leak. I know this isn't java but by default the deconstructor is called on all non-pointer values when the program is done executing so long as there is one defined. Please look more carefully at the code, the static struct is_pointer will always be false on non pointer types as NType will not be a pointer unless it is, of course, a pointer type. Also the code for deletePointer() is missing from my post but I will happily edit my question to include it. – TechWiz Jan 12 '12 at 0:50

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