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How to create a border of JPanel, which will be able to handle MouseEvents?

I tried to do something like that:

abstract public class MyBorder extends LineBorder implements MouseListener

But after implementing virtual methods I cannot assign mouseListener to my class. I guess, that I have to assign it into some JComponent.

So, how can I create some sort of border with mouseListener?

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3  
Are you saying the listener is not fired when you add it to the panel but hover over the border of the panel? I find that hard to believe. Can you add an SSCCE that shows the effect? –  Andrew Thompson Jan 11 '12 at 3:17
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2 Answers

A MouseListener must be added to a Component, not a Border. So to use your class the code would need to be something like:

Border border = new MyBorder();
panel.setBorder( border );
panel.addMouseListener( border );
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Yes but then this mouseListener will be added for the whole JPanel. Not only for my Border. Am I wrong? –  Dejwi Jan 11 '12 at 9:37
    
You can always ignore events within the border. –  Andrew Thompson Jan 11 '12 at 9:53
    
You are correct but you can always check if the mouse point is withing the insets of the panel. Or another option is to nest one panel within another panel. Then the inner panel will cover the outer panel. –  camickr Jan 11 '12 at 16:02
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Here is an SSCCE that supports that borders get mouse events on the component to which they are applied.

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.border.LineBorder;

class BorderListener {

    private void initGui() {
        final JPanel gui = new JPanel();
        gui.setBackground(Color.green);
        gui.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(300,50));
        gui.setBorder(new LineBorder(Color.blue, 10));
        gui.addMouseListener( new MouseAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent me) {
                System.out.println(me.getPoint());
            }
        });
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, gui);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                BorderListener bl = new BorderListener();
                bl.initGui();
            }
        });
    }
}

Typical Output

When clicking in the wide border assigned to this panel, you might see output along these lines.

java.awt.Point[x=8,y=3]
java.awt.Point[x=3,y=26]
java.awt.Point[x=1,y=43]
java.awt.Point[x=15,y=6]
java.awt.Point[x=101,y=5]
java.awt.Point[x=220,y=4]
java.awt.Point[x=287,y=5]
java.awt.Point[x=295,y=3]
Press any key to continue . . .

The border is 10px wide, so if (x||y < 10), it is within the line border.


Update

(Comment to camickr, which also applied to my answer)

Yes but then this mouseListener will be added for the whole JPanel. Not only for my Border. Am I wrong?

Just ignore the event if it happens in the non-border area of the panel.

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.border.LineBorder;

class BorderListener {

    private void initGui() {
        final JPanel gui = new JPanel();
        gui.setBackground(Color.yellow);
        gui.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(300,50));
        gui.setBorder(new LineBorder(Color.orange, 15));
        gui.addMouseListener( new MouseAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent me) {
                int w = gui.getWidth();
                int h = gui.getHeight();
                int x = me.getPoint().x;
                int y = me.getPoint().y;
                Insets ins = gui.getInsets();
                boolean inBorder =
                    ( x<ins.left ||
                    x>w-ins.right ||
                    y<ins.top ||
                    y>h-ins.bottom);
                if (inBorder) {
                    System.out.println(me.getPoint());
                } else {
                    System.out.println("Ignore!");
                }
            }
        });
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, gui);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                BorderListener bl = new BorderListener();
                bl.initGui();
            }
        });
    }
}

Output

java.awt.Point[x=168,y=7]
Ignore!
java.awt.Point[x=164,y=41]
java.awt.Point[x=297,y=39]
java.awt.Point[x=297,y=21]
Ignore!
Ignore!
java.awt.Point[x=2,y=21]
Press any key to continue . . .
share|improve this answer
    
I saw previously up_voted –  mKorbel Jan 11 '12 at 10:18
    
phaaa not, never see there reason for down_vote, my view/image going to the similair way (-: I use only JFrame by default :-), maybe Jeannete could be notified about setPreferredSize instead of setSize but this is details for reall top_hight_level GUI programing (habits) in Swing –  mKorbel Jan 11 '12 at 11:01
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