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Terminals send the arrow keys as sequences which begin with Esc. In Vim, there's an option 'esckeys' which lets keys which begin with Esc work in insert mode. It does this at the expense of the actual Esc key responding immediately, because Vim no longer knows if you're just pressing Esc or beginning to spell an arrow key.

Here's what I'd like to be able to do in insert mode:

  1. Press an arrow key and have the cursor go in that direction, and
  2. Press Esc and leave insert mode immediately.

I've got the beginnings of a solution. Even with :set noesckeys, I can still map a key to <Up> like so:

imap q <Up>

Of course, q is not a good key to make the cursor go up. Instead, I'd like to map my arrow keys my terminal emulator to something that doesn't start with Esc (like some random Unicode characters I'll never type) and then imap those to the directions in Vim.

The problem is this: when I leave Vim, my arrow keys will stop working. Only Vim knows what they mean now.

I'm working inside tmux inside iTerm2. Is there a way to make a binding like this live in only one tmux pane? Or make Vim inform tmux that it should use the crazy arrow key bindings while it's running? Any other ideas?

(Incidentally, I'd be happy to just not use arrow keys in insert mode at all myself, but I pair with people who expect them to work, and I want to be a courteous pair.)

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What terminal are you using? In gnome terminal, xterm, and OSX's terminal my arrow keys work exactly as you would expect in insert mode with vim running inside tmux. – David Brown Jan 11 '12 at 4:06
    
I'm using iTerm2. Arrow keys do work, but only with set esckeys. I've clarified the question. – Peeja Jan 11 '12 at 13:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just set ttimeoutlen (note: two leading ts, not one) to very small value. Something like 10 milliseconds, but it may work even with zero. With any positive ttimeoutlen you will have almost immediate exit (it will wait for that amount of milliseconds), with it set to zero it should be immediate (meaning that it would not wait for arrow keys to complete at all: either the whole sequence is in stdin buffer and it is considered to be an arrow key or not and it is considered to be a sequence of independent characters). I have 100 milliseconds and fail to notice this timeout.

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What is your problem exactly? Do your arrow keys work in Vim or not? Do they work in tmux or not?

I've had a problem with arrow keys displaying control characters ([A,[B…) in Vim/tmux once, I solved it by adding

nnoremap <Esc>A <up>
nnoremap <Esc>B <down>
nnoremap <Esc>C <right>
nnoremap <Esc>D <left>
inoremap <Esc>A <up>
inoremap <Esc>B <down>
inoremap <Esc>C <right>
inoremap <Esc>D <left>

to my ~/.vimrc.

share|improve this answer
    
They do work, with set esckeys, but I want to have Esc take me out of insert mode immediately, which it can't do with esckeys, because Vim doesn't know if I'm just pressing Esc or starting to spell an arrow key. I've clarified the question. – Peeja Jan 11 '12 at 13:58
    
I don't have set esckeys. The mappings above are defined specifically to provide arrow navigation without esckeys. If you insist on using set esckeys, :help esckeys gives you the answer to your question (timeoutlen). – romainl Jan 11 '12 at 15:03
    
My question is: how can I use arrow keys in insert mode and have Esc take me out of insert mode immediately (without a timeout). – Peeja Jan 12 '12 at 1:42
    
set noesckeys means arrows not working in CLI Vim and set esckeys means arrows working in CLI Vim. Did you read :help esckeys and my comment? Set timeoutlen (default 1000 milliseconds) to a small value like 200 and you will get exactly what you want but it will have some drawbacks: long commands will probably be a bit harder to type. – romainl Jan 12 '12 at 6:57
1  
@Peeja Just set ttimeoutlen (note: two leading ts, not one) to very small value. Something like 10 milliseconds, but it may work even with zero. With any positive ttimeoutlen you will have almost immediate exit (it will wait for that amount of milliseconds), with it set to zero it should be immediate. I have 100 milliseconds and fail to notice this timeout. – ZyX Mar 25 '13 at 15:27

this worked for me: add the following lines to your .vimrc file (type Ctrl-V and press cursor up for ^[OA ...):

 set t_ku=^[OA
 set t_kd=^[OB
 set t_kr=^[OC
 set t_kl=^[OD
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