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I have mathematica code to check whether a collection of sets satisfies the definition of a topology, I would now like to programmatically generate diagrams like these: topological spaces

How can this be done?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'm not familiar with your problem but to create diagrams from primitives, that look kind of like the ones you have pasted, you can do this:

start with the "base" case --

base = {Circle[{-0.4, 0.4}, 0.1], Disk[{0, .125}, 0.05], 
   Text[Style["1", 24], {0, -0.1}],
   Disk[{0.5, .125}, 0.05], Text[Style["2", 24], {0.5, -0.1}], 
   Disk[{1., .125}, 0.05], Text[Style["3", 24], {1., -0.1}], 
   Circle[{.5, 0}, {.9, .5}]};

Graphics[{base}, ImageSize -> 220]

enter image description here

From here just add elipses to the base case:

Graphics[{base, Circle[{0, 0}, {.15, .3}]}, ImageSize -> 220]

enter image description here

Graphics[{base, Circle[{0, 0}, {.15, .3}], 
  Circle[{0.5, 0}, {.15, .3}], Circle[{0.25, 0}, {.58, .38}]}, 
 ImageSize -> 220]

enter image description here

Graphics[{base, Circle[{0.5, 0}, {.15, .3}], 
  Circle[{0.25, 0}, {.58, .38}], Circle[{0.75, 0}, {.58, .38}]}, 
 ImageSize -> 220]

enter image description here

Graphics[{base, Circle[{0.5, 0}, {.15, .3}], 
  Circle[{1, 0}, {.15, .3}], Red, AbsoluteThickness[6], 
  Line[{{-0.4, -0.5}, {1.4, 0.55}}], 
  Line[{{-0.4, 0.55}, {1.4, -0.5}}]}, ImageSize -> 220]

enter image description here

Graphics[{base, Circle[{0.25, 0}, {.58, .38}], 
  Circle[{0.75, 0}, {.58, .38}], Red, AbsoluteThickness[6], 
  Line[{{-0.4, -0.5}, {1.4, 0.55}}], 
  Line[{{-0.4, 0.55}, {1.4, -0.5}}]}, ImageSize -> 220]

enter image description here

Note that I set Frame->True while tweaking these so I could see the coordinates.

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I am looking to programmatically generate an image for a variable number of points. I think I can generalize this, thank you for your help. –  Tobi Lehman Jan 11 '12 at 6:31
    
Friggin sweet job on the diagrams! So spot on that I had to laugh. +1 fo sho. –  telefunkenvf14 Jan 11 '12 at 7:03
1  
Wonderful! Double-clicking your pictures and moving the objects around one can cover cases that are different from @Tobi's examples e.g. the case where the subset {1,3} is an element of the list which requires laying points in a triangle. –  kguler Jan 11 '12 at 8:15

To complement Mike's cool diagrams, here is a way to check if an arbitrary finite list of lists is a topology, that is, (1) if it contains the empty set, (2) the base set, (3) closed under finite intersections, and (3) closed under union:

topologyQ[x_List] :=
  Intersection[x, #] === # & [
    Union[
      {Union @@ x},
      Intersection @@@ Rest@#,
      Union @@@ #
    ] & @ Subsets @ x
  ]

Applied to the six examples

list1 = {{}, {1, 2, 3}};
list2 = {{}, {1}, {1, 2, 3}};
list3 = {{}, {1}, {2}, {1, 2}, {1, 2, 3}};
list4 = {{}, {2}, {1, 2}, {2, 3}, {1, 2, 3}};
list5 = {{}, {2}, {3}, {1, 2, 3}};
list6 = {{}, {1, 2}, {2, 3}, {1, 2, 3}};

like

topologyQ /@ {list1, list2, list3, list4, list5, list6}

gives

{True, True, True, True, False, False}

EDIT 1: For a further refinement of the formulation, note that the operator

topoCover := (Union @@ {Union @@@ #, Intersection @@@ Rest@#} &)@Subsets@# &

gives the collection obtained by taking all unions and intersections of the elements of a collection of sets. A collection of sets list is a topology if it is a fixed point of the operator topoCover. So one can define an alternative function to check if list is topology:

 topologyQ2 := (topoCover@# === #) &

If list is not a topology, topoCover gives the smalles superset of list which is a topology. So

Complement[topoCover@#,#]&

gives the elements to be added to list to make it a topology.

One can also consider largest subset(s) of list which is a topology and the element(s) to be deleted from list to topologize it. This is done by using

 maxTopoSubset := (If[{} == #, None, Last@#] &)@(GatherBy[
                     Select[Subsets@#, topologyQ], Length[#] &]) &

Applied, for example, to list6 as

 maxTopoSubset@list6

we get the two topologies

 {{}, {1, 2}, {1, 2, 3}}, {{}, {2, 3}, {1, 2, 3}}}

To get the elements to be removed to get a topology from list, one can use

 removeToTopologize :=  Table[Complement[#, Part[maxTopoSubset@#, i]], {i, 
                            Length@maxTopoSubset@#}] &

Using with list6 as

 removeToTopologize@list6

we get

 {{{2, 3}}, {{1, 2}}}

that is, removing {2,3} or {1,2} from list6 gives a topology.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being so concise! Here I was all proud of myself for doing it in 9 lines. I'll have to read up on the Rest function and the @@ operator, I haven't seen that before. –  Tobi Lehman Jan 11 '12 at 7:30
    
Rest is simply leaving the first element and taking the rest of the list. @@ is short for Apply. In this usage And@@Flatten is replacing the head List with the head And. Also topologyQ /@ {list1, list2, list3, list4, list5, list6} is sufficient. @kguler is Union@Apply[Union,...] really necessary in the final line? Shouldn't Apply[Union,...] do the job? –  Mike Honeychurch Jan 11 '12 at 7:50
    
@Tobi, thank you. Actually, it took quite a few trial/error iterations to get it working. Had to use Rest to get rid of the empty set at the beginning of Subsets[] list. Of course, there is still ample room to make it shorter and more elegant. –  kguler Jan 11 '12 at 7:52
    
@Mike, I get, for example, {{}, {1, 2, 3}, {1, 2, 3}} from Apply[Union, Rest@Subsets[list1], 1]. Need to apply Union again to eliminate repeated elements before I check membership. –  kguler Jan 11 '12 at 7:58
    
ok. I overlooked your use of levelspec. Note that Apply[Union, Rest@Subsets[list1]] returns {{},{1,2,3}} which is what I was actually thinking of when I made the previous comment. –  Mike Honeychurch Jan 11 '12 at 8:08

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