Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a database query

SELECT Id FROM Phone WHERE Model = 'Droid'

that returns a table with one entry (because Id is a primary key). The table looks like this:

+----+
| Id |
+----+
|  1 |
+----+

Is there any way to get at that integer "1"? I'd like to use it in the following query, but it's generating a syntax error:

INSERT INTO Sale (Id, Price)
    VALUES (SELECT Id FROM Phone WHERE Model = 'Droid', 100.00);
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

Use this:

INSERT INTO Sale (Id, Price)
SELECT Id, 100.00 
  FROM Phone 
  WHERE Model = 'Droid';
share|improve this answer
add comment

Subqueries need wrapped in their own ()

share|improve this answer
add comment

You simply need brackets around your select query like so:

INSERT INTO Sale (Id, Price)
VALUES ((SELECT Id FROM Phone WHERE Model = 'Droid'), 100.00);

That should work correctly.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's not that you're getting some kind of type incompatibility; your syntax is just wrong. Try simply

INSERT INTO Sale (Id, Price)
(SELECT Id,100 FROM Phone WHERE Model = 'Droid');
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.