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Folks, forgive me, I'm pretty much a raw prawn when it comes to C#, and .NET generally... though I've been a professional programmer for 10 years.

I'm looking at this article: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/datatransferobject.aspx on Serializable DTO's.

The article includes this piece of code:

public static string SerializeDTO(DTO dto) {
    try {
        XmlSerializer xmlSer = new XmlSerializer(dto.GetType());
        StringWriter sWriter = new StringWriter();
        xmlSer.Serialize(sWriter, dto);
        return sWriter.ToString();
    } catch(Exception ex) {
        throw ex;
    }
}

The rest of the article looks sane and reasonable (to a noob), but that try-catch-throw throws a WtfException... Isn't this exactly equivalent to not handling exceptions at all?

Ergo:

public static string SerializeDTO(DTO dto) {
    XmlSerializer xmlSer = new XmlSerializer(dto.GetType());
    StringWriter sWriter = new StringWriter();
    xmlSer.Serialize(sWriter, dto);
    return sWriter.ToString();
}

Or am I missing something fundamental about error handling in C#... It's pretty much the same as Java (minus checked exceptions), isn't it? ... i.e they both refined C++.

I did search: Both SO and google, and failed to find an "authorative answer" to exactly this question... though this thread seems to support my contention that try-catch-throw is-a no-op.

Cheers all. Thanx for your time.


EDIT:

Just to summarise for anyone who finds this thread in future...

DO NOT

try {
  // do stuff that might throw an exception
} catch (Exception e) {
  throw e; // this destroys the strack trace information!
}

The stack trace information can be crucial to identifying the root cause of the problem!

DO

try {
  // do stuff that might throw an exception
} catch (SqlException e) {
  // log it
  if (e.ErrorCode != NO_ROW_ERROR) { // filter out NoDataFound.
    // do special cleanup, like maybe closing the "dirty" database connection.
    throw; // this preserves the stack trace
  }
} catch (IOException e) {
  // log it
  throw;
} catch (Exception e) {
  // log it
  throw new DAOException("Excrement occurred", e); // wrapped & chained exceptions (just like java).
} finally {
  // normal clean goes here (like closing open files).
}

Catch the more specific exceptions before the less specific ones (just like Java).

Thank you all for your time.

Cheers all. Keith.


References:

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35  
"but that try-catch-throw throws a WtfException" - I like that part :o) –  Fredrik Mörk May 19 '09 at 8:32
2  
@Fredrik: WtfException... Hehe... I'm so glad you like it ;-) –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 10:09
1  
Great question - this sparked good answers and was useful! –  David Robbins May 19 '09 at 10:54
3  
Good summary; extra points for including the finally block. –  Fredrik Mörk May 19 '09 at 19:38
    
the WTFException LOL!, good one @FredrikMörk –  franko_camron Dec 16 '11 at 16:13
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14 Answers

up vote 141 down vote accepted

First; the way that the code in the article does it is evil. throw ex will reset the call stack in the exception to the point where this throw statement is; losing the information about where the exception actually was created.

Second, if you just catch and re-throw like that, I see no added value, the code example above would be just as good (or, given the throw ex bit, even better) without the try-catch.

However, there are cases where you might want to catch and rethrow an exception. Logging could be one of them:

try 
{
    // code that may throw exceptions    
}
catch(Exception ex) 
{
    // add error logging here
    throw;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
@Fredrick, just fyi (though you probably know) if you're not going to use that ex object, then there's no need to instantiate it. –  Eoin Campbell May 19 '09 at 8:16
26  
@Eoin: If its not instantiated it'd be rather difficult to log it. –  Dan-o May 19 '09 at 8:22
12  
Yep, I think "evil" is about right... consider the case of null pointer exception thrown somewhere from a large body of code. The message is vanilla, without the stack trace you're left with "something was null somewhere". NOT good when production is dead; and you've NO minutes or less to work out the flamin' problem is, and dismiss or rectify it... Good exception handling is worth it's weight in gold. –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 9:14
3  
Is that true for Java as well ... "throw" vs. "throw ex"? –  JasonStoltz Mar 11 '11 at 15:23
4  
@Jason, see this question. In Java, throw ex does not restart the stacktrace. –  Matthew Flaschen Jan 31 '12 at 18:22
show 8 more comments

You don't want to throw ex - as this will lose the call stack.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229005.aspx

And yes, the try...catch is doing nothing useful (apart from lose the call stack - so it's actually worse - unless for some reason you didn't want to expose this information)

share|improve this answer
2  
I'll read through that article, once I've read through and responded to this abundance of answers. I humbly THANK YOU for your time. –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 9:11
add comment

A valid reason for rethrowing exceptions can be that you want to add information to the exception, or perhaps wrap the original exception in one of your own making:

public static string SerializeDTO(DTO dto) {
  try {
      XmlSerializer xmlSer = new XmlSerializer(dto.GetType());
      StringWriter sWriter = new StringWriter();
      xmlSer.Serialize(sWriter, dto);
      return sWriter.ToString();
  }
  catch(Exception ex) {
    string message = 
      String.Format("Something went wrong serializing DTO {0}", DTO);
    throw new MyLibraryException(message, ex);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanx, yep exception wrapping (especially chained) is perfectly sane... what is not sane is catching an exception just so you can chuck away the stack trace, or worse, eat it. –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 9:16
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Don't do this,

try 
{
...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
   throw ex;
}

You'll lose the stack trace information...

Either do,

try { ... }
catch { throw; }

OR

try { ... }
catch (Exception ex)
{
    throw new Exception("My Custom Error Message", ex);
}

One of the reason you might want to rethrow is if you're handling different exceptions, for e.g.

try
{
   ...
}
catch(SQLException sex)
{
   //Do Custom Logging 
   //Don't throw exception - swallow it here
}
catch(OtherException oex)
{
   //Do something else
   throw new WrappedException("Other Exception occured");
}
catch
{
   System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Eeep! an error, not to worry, will be handled higher up the call stack");
   throw; //Chuck everything else back up the stack
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Why not just leave catch { throw } out altogether? –  AnthonyWJones May 19 '09 at 8:07
1  
added an example as to why, but yeah, in that contrived case, you could leave it out. –  Eoin Campbell May 19 '09 at 8:15
2  
there's still value in leaving catch {throw; } at the bottom of a list of specific exception type catch's on the grounds it proves the author considered the case, though a comment might equally suffice. Not guessing when you read code is a good thing. –  annakata May 19 '09 at 8:36
24  
For some reason, the name of the SQLException bothers me. –  Michael Myers May 20 '09 at 21:13
4  
That catch (Exception) { throw new Exception(...) } is something you should never, ever, ever do, simply because you're obfuscating the exception information and making exception filtering further up the call stack unnecessarily difficult. The only time you should catch one type of exception and throw another is when you are implementing an abstraction layer and you need to transform a provider-specific exception type (e.g. SqlException versus XmlException) into a more generic one (e.g. DataLoadingException). –  jammycakes Oct 18 '10 at 12:14
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it depends what you are doing in the catch block, and if you are wanting to pass the error on to the calling code or not.

you might say Catch io.FileNotFoundExeption ex and then use an alternative file path or some such, but still throw the error on.

Also doing Throw instead of Throw Ex allows you to keep the full stack trace. Throw ex restarts the stack trace from the throw statement (hope that makes sense)

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Gotcha. Thank you. –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 9:36
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Isn't this exactly equivalent to not handling exceptions at all?

Not exactly, it isn't the same. It resets the exception's stacktrace. Though I agree that this probably is a mistake, and thus an example of bad code.

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1  
Thank you Arjan. –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 9:36
add comment

In the example in the code you have posted there is, in fact, no point in catching the exception as there is nothing done on the catch it is just re-thown, in fact it does more harm than good as the call stack is lost.

You would, however catch an exception to do some logic (for example closing sql connection of file lock, or just some logging) in the event of an exception the throw it back to the calling code to deal with. This would be more common in a business layer than front end code as you may want the coder implementing your business layer to handle the exception.

To re-iterate though the There is NO point in catching the exception in the example you posted. DON'T do it like that!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Gotcha. –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 9:37
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C# doesn't support CIL "filtered exceptions", which VB does, so in C# one reason for re-throwing an exception is that you don't have enough information at the time of catch() to determine whether you wanted to actually catch the exception.

For example, in VB you can do

Try
 ..
Catch Ex As MyException When Ex.ErrorCode = 123
 .. 
End Try

...which would not handle MyExceptions with different ErrorCode values. In C#, you would have to catch and re-throw the MyException if the ErrorCode was not 123:

try {
 ..
}
catch(MyException ex) {
 if (ex.ErrorCode != 123) throw;
 ..
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Good point about the filtered exceptions! –  Dave Van den Eynde May 19 '09 at 8:38
1  
Dave, but (in java at least) you wouldn't throw a "generic" MyException, you'd define a SPECIFIC exception type and throw it, allowing it to be differentiated-by-type in the catch block... But yes, if your not the architect of the exception (I'm thinking JDBC's SQLException (Java again) here, which is disgustingly generic, and exposes getErrorCode() method... Hmmm... You've got a point, it's just that I think there's a better way to do it, where possible. Cheers Mate. I appreciate your time, a lot. Keith. –  corlettk May 19 '09 at 9:43
1  
Well, the question is "Why catch and rethrow Exception in C#?", and this is an answer. =] ...and even with specialized exceptions, Exception Filters make sense: consider the case where you are, let's say, handling a SqlTimeoutException and a SqlConnectionResetException, which are both SqlException. Exception Filters let you catch an SqlException only when it's one of these two, so instead of cluttering your try/catch with identical handling for these two, you could "catch SqlException ex when ex is SqlTimeoutException Or ex is SqlConnectionResetException". (I'm not Dave btw) –  bzlm May 19 '09 at 11:48
1  
Hey, I didn't write the answer :) I just fixed the code. –  Dave Van den Eynde May 20 '09 at 8:32
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One possible reason to catch-throw is to disable any exception filters deeper up the stack from filtering down (random old link). But of course, if that was the intention, there would be a comment there saying so.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't get what you where on about until I read the link... and I'm still not exactly sure what you're on about... me being totally unfamiliar with VB.NET. I think it results in the sum being reported "inconsistent", right?... I'm a BIG fan of static methods.. apart from them being simple, there's less chance of inconsistency if you seperate the setting of attributes from the code which does the actual work. The stack is "self cleansing". –  corlettk Aug 4 '09 at 14:31
2  
People expect that when they write "try { Foo(); } finally { Bar(); }" that nothing runs between Foo and Bar. But this is not true; if your caller added an exception filter, and there is no intervening 'catch', and Foo() throws, then some other random code from your caller will run before your finally (Bar) runs. This is very bad if you've broken invariants or elevated security, expecting that they'll be 'immediately' restored to normal by the finally and no other code will see the temporary change. –  Brian Aug 4 '09 at 17:34
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Sorry, but many examples as "improved design" still smell horribly or can be extremely misleading. Having try { } catch { log; throw } is just utterly pointless. Exception logging should be done in central place inside the application. exceptions bubble up the stacktrace anyway, why not log them somewhere up and close to the borders of the system?

Caution should be used when you serialize your context (i.e. DTO in one given example) just into the log message. It can easily contain sensitive information one might not want to reach the hands of all the people who can access the log files. And if you don't add any new information to the exception, I really don't see the point of exception wrapping. Good old Java has some point for that, it requires caller to know what kind of exceptions one should expect then calling the code. Since you don't have this in .NET, wrapping doesn't do any good on at least 80% of the cases I've seen.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your thought Joe. In Java (and C#, I suppose) I would love to see a class-level annotation @FaultBoundary which forces ALL exceptions (including unchecked exception-types) to be caught-or-declared-to-be-thrown. I would use this annotation on public interfaces of each architectural layer. So the @FaultBoundary ThingDAO interface would not be able to leak implementation details such as SQLExceptions, NPE's, or AIOB's. Instead "causal" stacktrace would be logged and a DAOSystemException would be thrown... I define System exception as "permanently fatal". –  corlettk Dec 3 '09 at 10:49
4  
There are plenty of reasons to catch, log, then rethrow. Specifically if the method with the catch log has information you lose once you're out of the method. The error may be handled later but not logged, and you've lost information about defects in the system. –  Andy Apr 9 '12 at 17:50
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My main reason for having code like:

try
{
  //Some code
}
catch ( Exception e )
{
  throw;
}

Is so i can have a breakpoint in the catch, that has an instantiated Exception object. I do this a lot while developing/debugging. Of course the compiler gives me warning on all the unused e's, and ideally they should be removed before a release build.

They are nice during debugging though.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, I'll pay that one, but yes, you wouldn't want to see that in published code... ergo: I would be ashamed to publish it ;-) –  corlettk Sep 19 '09 at 6:36
13  
Actually, this isn't necessary -- in Visual Studio you can set the debugger to break when an exception is thrown and it brings up the exception details in an inspector window for you. –  jammycakes Oct 15 '09 at 15:26
4  
If you want to use some code ONLY during debugging, use #if DEBUG ... #endif , and you don't need to remove these lines –  Michael Freidgeim Dec 25 '12 at 22:22
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In addition to what the others have said, see my answer to a related question which shows that catching and rethrowing is not a no-op (it's in VB, but some of the code could be C# invoked from VB).

share|improve this answer
    
I thank you for your thoughts... See also pluralsight.com/community/blogs/keith/archive/2005/03/31/… by Keith Brown and linked by Brian (a very naughty boy no doubt) on July 30 2009. –  corlettk Dec 3 '09 at 10:59
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Most of answers talking about scenario catch-log-rethrow.

Instead of writing it in your code consider to use AOP, in particular Postsharp.Diagnostic.Toolkit with OnExceptionOptions IncludeParameterValue and IncludeThisArgument

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A point that people haven't mentioned is that while .NET languages don't really make a proper distinction, the question of whether one should take action when an exception occurs, and whether one will resolve it, are actually distinct questions. There are many cases where one should take action based upon exceptions one has no hope of resolving, and there are some cases where all that is necessary to "resolve" an exception is to unwind the stack to a certain point--no further action required.

Because of the common wisdom that one should only "catch" things one can "handle", a lot of code which should take action when exceptions occur, doesn't. For example, a lot of code will acquire a lock, put the guarded object "temporarily" into a state which violates its invariants, then put it object into a legitimate state, and then release the lock back before anyone else can see the object. If an exception occurs while the object is in a dangerously-invalid state, common practice is to release the lock with the object in that . A much better pattern would be to have an exception that occurs while the object is in a "dangerous" condition expressly invalidate the lock so any future attempt to acquire it will immediately fail. Consistent use of such a pattern would greatly improve the safety of so-called "Pokemon" exception handling, which IMHO gets a bad reputation primarily because of code which allows exceptions to percolate up without taking appropriate action first.

In most .NET languages, the only way for code to take action based upon an exception is to "catch" it (even though it knows it's not going to resolve the exception), perform the action in question and then throw;). Another possible approach if code doesn't care about what exception is thrown is to use an ok flag with a try/finally block; set the ok flag to false before the block, and to true before the block exits, and before any return that's within the block. Then, within finally, assume that if ok isn't set, an exception must have occurred. Such an approach is semantically better than a catch/throw, but is ugly and is less maintainable than it should be.

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