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I have some code that I'm using in a standard C# application.

I'm sharing the library in a Silverlight project that doesn't allow unsafe code. I don't know much at all about unsafe/pointer logic/arithmetic and was wondering if someone could translate the following code snippet so that it will run without /unsafe. I don't care about the performance drop since the code won't be called often on the client. Thanks in advance for any assistance.

    public static unsafe int GeStableHash(string name)
    {
        fixed (char* str = name)
        {
            char* chPtr = str;
            int num = 352654597;
            int num2 = num;
            int* numPtr = (int*)chPtr;
            for (int i = name.Length; i > 0; i -= 4)
            {
                num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 27)) ^ numPtr[0];
                if (i <= 2)
                {
                    break;
                }
                num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 27)) ^ numPtr[1];
                numPtr += 2;
            }
            return (num + (num2 * 1566083941));
        }
    }

As per reply below, I looked into the Silverlight implementation of this function.

Now I'm even more confused. The code I see in the SL mscorlib.dll string.GetHashCode function looks like this (it uses the unsafe keyword and gives syntax errors in Visual Studio!):

[SecuritySafeCritical, ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.MayFail)]
public unsafe override int GetHashCode()
{
    IntPtr arg_0F_0;
    IntPtr expr_06 = arg_0F_0 = this;
    if (expr_06 != 0)
    {
        arg_0F_0 = (IntPtr)((int)expr_06 + RuntimeHelpers.OffsetToStringData);
    }
    char* ptr = arg_0F_0;
    int num = 352654597;
    int num2 = num;
    int* ptr2 = (int*)ptr;
    int i;
    for (i = this.Length; i > 2; i -= 4)
    {
        num = ((num << 5) + num + (num >> 27) ^ *ptr2);
        num2 = ((num2 << 5) + num2 + (num2 >> 27) ^ ptr2[(IntPtr)4 / 4]);
        ptr2 += (IntPtr)8 / 4;
    }
    if (i > 0)
    {
        num = ((num << 5) + num + (num >> 27) ^ *ptr2);
    }
    return num + num2 * 1566083941;
}

The solution can be found here: http://codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/7661/c-unsafe-code-translation

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This question might be a better fit for Code Review: codereview.stackexchange.com –  apiguy Jan 11 '12 at 5:54
    
Didn't know that existed! Thanks. :D –  user1142433 Jan 11 '12 at 5:57
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3 Answers

It looks like this is the implementation of GetHashCode

So perhaps you don't need to do anything "datatohash".GetHashCode(); will suffice

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Isn't there some warning that GethashCode can't be relied upon to have the same implementation across various systems? I figured if I explicitly define the method then I can be sure the implementation is consistent. Am I understanding that incorrectly? –  user1142433 Jan 11 '12 at 6:08
    
Not sure where you heard/saw that, a reference would be good. –  Shaun Wilde Jan 11 '12 at 6:19
2  
"the .NET Framework does not guarantee the default implementation of the GetHashCode method, and the value it returns will be the same between different versions of the .NET Framework. " msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.gethashcode.aspx –  user1142433 Jan 11 '12 at 6:23
    
Are you passing the hashcode between silverlight and say a .net application? If so have you used ILSpy/reflector to look at the implementation on those runtimes? –  Shaun Wilde Jan 11 '12 at 6:29
    
No, I haven't used those before. I'll google it and see what I can come up with. Thanks! –  user1142433 Jan 11 '12 at 6:44
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The hash code implementations you posted use pointer arithmetic for better performance. It compiles in Visual Studio if you put it in a .NET Framework project with the "allow unsafe code" option.

It would be possible to compute the same result by using the same logic, but indexing the string directly. For example, the expression "Hello, World"[7] evaluates to 'W'.

I'll leave the translation itself as the proverbial exercise for the reader.

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Why don't you do something like an MD5 hash? It's stable, and is implemented in various places.

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