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I have a very simple JSON object like the following:

{
   "people":[
      {
         "f_name":"john",
         "l_name":"doe",
         "sequence":"0",
         "title":"president",
         "url":"google.com",
         "color":"333333"
      },
      {
         "f_name":"michael",
         "l_name":"goodyear",
         "sequence":"0",
         "title":"general manager",
         "url":"google.com",
         "color":"333333"
      }
   ]
}

Now that this is returned from my server side code, I run jQuery.each to form the necessary html and output the result.

Right now what I am doing is sending an AJAX call to the server containing my sort info... e.g. "Title DESC" and re-run an SQL query to return the new result set. But I want to avoid this and use jQuery to sort the resulting JSON to prevent round trips to the server, and multiple database access.

How can I achieve this using jQuery?

share|improve this question
    
You might want to try a variation of this: wrichards.com/blog/2009/02/jquery-sorting-elements –  Tahir Akhtar May 19 '09 at 8:13
    
Just FYI... you can use any tutorial on the internet about javascript array sorting and it will apply directly to your scenario since JSON is simply a javascript object/array. JS makes no differentiation between objects and arrays since everything is basically an object in JS anyways. :-) –  KyleFarris May 19 '09 at 17:57
    
@Emin, please consider changing the accepted answer, since the answer I provided has now received almost twice as many upvotes as the previously accepted answer. –  Sean the Bean May 29 '13 at 19:45
    
@SeantheBean true.. Did it.. –  Emin May 30 '13 at 6:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Try this on for elegance and efficiency.

I love my jQuery, but it's not ideal for sorting here, unless you can only use the existing html (you don't have the array handy to do your sorting on). Just write a function that takes the property name as a string and the order (ascending or descending) as a boolean, write a simple comparison function, and use the native js sort() function. This way you don't have to write a separate sorting function for each property:

var people= [
    {
        "f_name": "john",
        "l_name": "doe",
        "sequence": "0",
        "title" : "president",
        "url" : "google.com",
        "color" : "333333",
    }
    // etc
];

function sortResults(prop, asc) {
    people = people.sort(function(a, b) {
        if (asc) return (a[prop] > b[prop]) ? 1 : ((a[prop] < b[prop]) ? -1 : 0);
        else return (b[prop] > a[prop]) ? 1 : ((b[prop] < a[prop]) ? -1 : 0);
    });
    showResults();
}

Then:

sortResults('l_name', true);

Play with a working example here.

share|improve this answer
    
Great Job, it is helped me a lot. –  manny Mar 7 '12 at 14:15
    
Thanks, this one is fast and efficient! +1 –  Mr. Smith Mar 26 '12 at 7:37
1  
This doesn't seem to be working for me when I put in a few more rows of data. It seems to sort differently everytime I try. Here is the fiddle: jsfiddle.net/Jsar8 Any help is appreciated. –  Jeff Borden Dec 19 '12 at 20:56
    
Surprisingly, Chrome (as well as some other major browsers) do not use a "stable" (i.e. consistent?) sorting algorithm. The following questions have some good discussion on browsers' sorting methods: stackoverflow.com/questions/1427608/… stackoverflow.com/questions/234683/… stackoverflow.com/questions/3026281/… –  Sean the Bean Dec 22 '12 at 6:31
1  
@Hugolpz To be precise, Chrome, Opera <10, Dolphin, and FF <3 implement unstable sorting algorithms (according to stackoverflow.com/questions/3026281 and the best information I could find across the internet). The algorithms used in FF 3+, Opera 10+, IE, and Safari are stable. The related SO questions in my previous comment go much more in depth about Array.sort() implementations. –  Sean the Bean Feb 20 '13 at 6:21
jQuery.fn.sort = function() {  
    return this.pushStack( [].sort.apply( this, arguments ), []);  
};  

 function sortLastName(a,b){  
     if (a.l_name == b.l_name){
       return 0;
     }
     return a.l_name> b.l_name ? 1 : -1;  
 };  
  function sortLastNameDesc(a,b){  
     return sortLastName(a,b) * -1;  
 };
var people= [
{
"f_name": "john",
"l_name": "doe",
"sequence": "0",
"title" : "president",
"url" : "google.com",
"color" : "333333",
},
{
"f_name": "michael",
"l_name": "goodyear",
"sequence": "0",
"title" : "general manager",
"url" : "google.com",
"color" : "333333",
}]

sorted=$(people).sort(sortLastNameDesc);
share|improve this answer
    
See my adaptation of Bill Richards code. It's sorting json array based on last name in descending order. The sort callback can be generalized by passing the field name in constructor of function. –  Tahir Akhtar May 19 '09 at 10:35
1  
You have to replace innerHTML with l_name in sortLastName –  Magnar May 19 '09 at 10:40
    
Thanks Magnar. I have edited the answer. –  Tahir Akhtar May 19 '09 at 11:58
    
Just to clarify, my first comment, what I mean is that this code can be further modified to support generic sorting. –  Tahir Akhtar May 19 '09 at 11:59
    
Shouldn't sortLastName() return 0 if a.l_name and b.l_name are equal? Perhaps because of the data, it is unnecessary in this case, but reading the code, I can't help thinking of this: blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2009/05/08/9595334.aspx ... "First of all, your first comparison function clearly violates the requirements for being a comparison function: It must return zero if the two items compare equal." –  Grant Wagner May 19 '09 at 20:46

The following works on all tested devices (Chrome, Android default browser, FF).

Given data such :

var people = [ 
{ 'myKey': 'A', 'status': 0 },
{ 'myKey': 'D', 'status': 3 },
{ 'myKey': 'E', 'status': 3 },
{ 'myKey': 'F', 'status': 2 },
{ 'myKey': 'G', 'status': 7 },
...
];

Sorting by ascending or reverse order:

function sortJSON(data, key, way) {
    return data.sort(function(a, b) {
        var x = a[key]; var y = b[key];
        if (way === '123' ) { return ((x < y) ? -1 : ((x > y) ? 1 : 0)); }
        if (way === '321') { return ((x > y) ? -1 : ((x < y) ? 1 : 0)); }
    });
}

people2 = sortJSON(people,'status', '321'); // 123 or 321
alert("2. After processing (0 to x if 123; x to 0 if 321): "+JSON.stringify(people2));

Successfully pass equal values (keep same order). Ascendant (123) or descendant (321), works for numbers, letters, and unicodes. Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/VAKrE/604/

share|improve this answer

Here's a multiple-level sort method. I'm including a snippet from an Angular JS module, but you can accomplish the same thing by scoping the sort keys objects such that your sort function has access to them. You can see the full module at Plunker.

$scope.sortMyData = function (a, b)
{
  var retVal = 0, key;
  for (var i = 0; i < $scope.sortKeys.length; i++)
  {
    if (retVal !== 0)
    {
      break;
    }
    else
    {
      key = $scope.sortKeys[i];
      if ('asc' === key.direction)
      {
        retVal = (a[key.field] < b[key.field]) ? -1 : (a[key.field] > b[key.field]) ? 1 : 0;
      }
      else
      {
        retVal = (a[key.field] < b[key.field]) ? 1 : (a[key.field] > b[key.field]) ? -1 : 0;
      }
    }
  }
  return retVal;
};
share|improve this answer

If you don't mind using an external library, Lodash has lots of wonderful utilities

var people = [
  {
     "f_name":"john",
     "l_name":"doe",
     "sequence":"0",
     "title":"president",
     "url":"google.com",
     "color":"333333"
  },
  {
     "f_name":"michael",
     "l_name":"goodyear",
     "sequence":"0",
     "title":"general manager",
     "url":"google.com",
     "color":"333333"
  }
];


var sorted = _.sortBy(people, "l_name")

You can also sort by multiple properties. Here's a plunk showing it in action

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