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How do I create a namespace in JavaScript so that my objects and functions aren't overwritten by other same-named objects and functions? I've used the following:

if (Foo == null || typeof(Foo) != "object") { var Foo = new Object();}

Is there a more elegant or succinct way of doing this?

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16  
I can see where you're going with the checking to see if the namespace is taken, but since the object will not be created if this fails I think the better approach is to alert if the namespace is taken. Frankly this should just not happen in most JS situations and should be caught quickly in development. –  annakata May 19 '09 at 8:54
12  
Take a top-level "namespace" (window property). Own it. Conflicts should be detected early on in testing. Don't bother adding all these "what if" checks. It's a fatal issue for duplicate "namespaces" and should be treated as such. You can follow an approach like jQuery to allow inhabiting a custom "namespace"; but this is still a design-time issue. –  user166390 Jul 4 '10 at 4:33
    
Please change your accepted answer to stackoverflow.com/questions/881515/… , which is a much more elegant and updated solution. –  hlfcoding Sep 30 '10 at 7:08
    
@pst what about what YUI does? I believe they do exactly this for incrementally adding to their namespace. tricks like this are needed for performance in a HTTP environment surely? –  Simon_Weaver May 4 '11 at 3:28
    
see also stackoverflow.com/questions/2102591/… for performance issues –  Tim Abell Jun 15 '12 at 11:37

17 Answers 17

up vote 411 down vote accepted

I like this:

var yourNamespace = {

    foo: function() {
    },

    bar: function() {
    }
};

...

yourNamespace.foo();
share|improve this answer
29  
The important point is to be religious about expanding no further than the one root variable. Everything must flow from this. –  annakata May 19 '09 at 8:54
9  
This does not create a closure for your code - it makes it tedious to call your other functions because they always have to look like: yourNamespace.bar(); I made an open source project JUST to address this design problem: github.com/mckoss/namespace. –  mckoss Mar 18 '11 at 22:32
14  
annakata: "The important point is to be religious about expanding no further than the one root variable."- Why is this? –  user406905 Mar 30 '11 at 19:22
6  
@alex - why should there be a shallow object structure? –  Ryan May 14 '12 at 19:42
8  
@Ryan I meant that everything should be under MyApp, e.g. MyApp.Views.Profile = {} rather than MyApp.users = {} and MyViews.Profile = {}. Not necessarily that there should only be two levels depth. –  alex May 14 '12 at 23:29

I use the approach found on the Enterprise jQuery site, here

Here is their example showing how to declare private & public properties and functions. Everything is done as a self-executing anonymous function.

(function( skillet, $, undefined ) {
    //Private Property
    var isHot = true;

    //Public Property
    skillet.ingredient = "Bacon Strips";

    //Public Method
    skillet.fry = function() {
        var oliveOil;

        addItem( "\t\n Butter \n\t" );
        addItem( oliveOil );
        console.log( "Frying " + skillet.ingredient );
    };

    //Private Method
    function addItem( item ) {
        if ( item !== undefined ) {
            console.log( "Adding " + $.trim(item) );
        }
    }    
}( window.skillet = window.skillet || {}, jQuery ));

So if you want to access one of the public members you would just go skillet.fry() or skillet.ingredients

What's really cool is that you can now extend the namespace using the exact same syntax.

//Adding New Functionality to the Skillet
(function( skillet, $, undefined ) {
    //Private Property
    var amountOfGrease = "1 Cup";

    //Public Method
    skillet.toString = function() {
        console.log( skillet.quantity + " " + 
                     skillet.ingredient + " & " + 
                     amountOfGrease + " of Grease" );
        console.log( isHot ? "Hot" : "Cold" );
    };    
}( window.skillet = window.skillet || {}, jQuery ));
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18  
+1 great article, thanks for sharing the link –  Christophe May 13 '11 at 11:52
71  
This is vastly underrated. +1 –  smelch Jun 22 '11 at 13:05
7  
From Elijah's article, here are the pros and cons of this approach, paraphrased. Pros: 1. Public and private properties and methods, 2. doesn’t use cumbersome OLN, 3. Protects undefined 4. Ensures that $ refers to jQuery, 5. Namespace can span files, Cons: Harder to understand than OLN –  Jared Beck Oct 14 '11 at 0:47
19  
The linked article was the single best resource on this topic I've ever read. ++ –  András Szepesházi Oct 18 '11 at 20:22
8  
@CpILL: not sure if still relevant, but the third, undefined argument is source of the variable of value undefined. While working with older browsers / javascript standard (ecmascript 5, javascript < 1.8.5 ~ firefox 4), the global-scope variable undefined is writable, so anyone could rewrite its value. Adding third, additional argument you are not passing makes it value undefined, so you were creating namespace-scope undefined which won't be rewritten by outside sources. –  mrówa May 22 '13 at 11:29

Another way to do it, which I consider it to be a little bit less restrictive than the object literal form, is this:

var ns = new function() {

    var internalFunction = function() {

    };

    this.publicFunction = function() {

    };
};

The above is pretty much like the module pattern and whether you like it or not, it allows you to expose all your functions as public, while avoiding the rigid structure of an object literal.

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15  
1. There's a difference between OLN and the module pattern. 2. I don't /always/ like OLN as you have to remember to not put the last trailing comma and all your attributes must be initialized with a value (like null or undefined). Also, if you need closures for member functions, you will need small function factories for each of those methods. Another thing is that you must enclose all your control structures inside functions, whereas the above form does not impose that. That's not to say that I don't use OLN, is just that sometimes I don't like it. –  Ionuț G. Stan May 19 '09 at 9:21
7  
I like this approach because it allows for private functions, variables, and pseudo-constants (i.e. var API_KEY = 12345;). –  Lawrence Barsanti Oct 14 '10 at 14:30
10  
I like this better than the comma separated object container that's voted higher. I don't see any shortcomings in comparison, either. Am I missing something? –  Lucent Nov 7 '10 at 1:16
4  
JS Newbie here... why is it that I don't have to type ns().publicFunction(), that is... ns.publicFunction() works. –  John Kraft Aug 11 '11 at 21:46
10  
@John Kraft, it's necause of the new keyword in front of the function keyword. Basically, what is doing is that it's declaring an anonymous function (and as a function, it is as well a constructor), and it then immediately invokes it as a constructor using new. As such, the final value that gets stored inside ns is an (unique) instance of that anonymous constructor. Hope it makes sense. –  Ionuț G. Stan Aug 12 '11 at 7:19

Is there a more elegant or succinct way of doing this?

yes it is:

var your_namespace = your_namespace || {};

then you can have

var your_namespace = your_namespace || {};
your_namespace.Foo = {toAlert:'test'};
your_namespace.Bar = function(arg) 
{
    alert(arg);
};
with(your_namespace)
{
   Bar(Foo.toAlert);
}
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1  
this gives me an error in IE7. var your_namespace = (typeof your_namespace == "undefined" || !your_namespace ) ? {} : your_namespace ; works better. –  marshall Nov 5 '10 at 7:28
7  
it should be var your_namespace = your_namespace = your_namespace || {} Works in every browser ;) –  Palo Mar 9 '11 at 11:45
    
+1 from me! Thin one works as Jaco Pretorius answer by expanding one library to different files or different places inside the same file. Just brilliant! –  centurian Apr 20 '13 at 7:34
    
@Palo Can you please explain why it should be like this? var your_namespace = your_namespace = your_namespace || {} –  Sriram May 29 '13 at 12:05
    
What advantage would this have over var your_namespace = {};? –  Jack Tuck Jul 28 at 20:40

Because you may write different files of javascript and later combine or not combine them in an application each needs to be able to recover or construct the namespace object without damaging the work of other files...

One file might intend to use the namespace namespace.namespace1

namespace = window.namespace || {};
namespace.namespace1 = namespace.namespace1 || {};

namespace.namespace1.doSomeThing = function(){}

Another file might want to use the namespace namespace.namespace2

namespace = window.namespace || {};
namespace.namespace2 = namespace.namespace2 || {};

namespace.namespace2.doSomeThing = function(){}

These two files can live together or apart without colliding.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the best solution for me! –  user715300 Sep 15 '13 at 22:05
    
I use this approach too with multiple files –  Mirko Aug 12 at 12:04

I normally build it in a closure:

var MYNS = MYNS || {};

MYNS.subns = (function() {

    function privateMethod() {
        // Do private stuff, or build internal.
        return "Message";
    }

    return {
        someProperty: 'prop value',
        publicMethod: function() {
            return privateMethod() + " stuff";
        }
    };
})();

My style over the years has had a subtle change since writing this, I now find myself writing the closure like this:

var MYNS = MYNS || {};

MYNS.subns = (function() {
    var internalState = "Message";

    var privateMethod = function() {
        // Do private stuff, or build internal.
        return internalState;
    };
    var publicMethod = function() {
        return privateMethod() + " stuff";
    };

    return {
        someProperty: 'prop value',
        publicMethod: publicMethod
    };
})();

I find this way the public API and implementation are easier to understand, think of the return statement as being a public interface to the implementation.

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Should you not check for MYNS.subns = MYNS.subns || {} ?? –  Mirko Aug 12 at 11:58
    
A good point that should be the exercise to the developers intent. You need to consider what to do when it does exist, replace it, error, use existing or version check and conditionally replace. I've had differing situations that call for each variants. In most cases you possibly have this as a low risk edge case and replacing can be beneficial, consider a rogue module that tried to hijack the NS. –  Brett Ryan Aug 12 at 15:35

This is a follow-up to user106826's link to Namespace.js. It seems the project moved to github. The new link is now:

http://github.com/smith/namespacedotjs

I have been using this simple js helper for my tiny project and so far it seems to be light yet versatile enough to handle namespacing and loading modules/classes. It would be great if it would allow me to import a package into a namespace of my choice, not just the global namespace... sigh, but that's besides the point.

It allows you to declare the namespace then define objects/modules in that namespace:

Namespace('my.awesome.package'); 
my.awesome.package.WildClass = {};

Another option is to declare the namespace and it's contents at once:

Namespace('my.awesome.package', {
    SuperDuperClass: {
        saveTheDay: function() {
            alert('You are welcome.');
        }
    }
});

For more usage examples, look at the example.js file in the source: http://github.com/smith/namespacedotjs/blob/master/example/sandbox.js

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2  
As long as you remember this has some performance implications, as each time you access my.awesome.package.WildClass you're accessing the awesome property of my, the package property of my.awesome, and the WildClass property of my.awesome.package. –  SamStephens Sep 19 '11 at 2:25

Here's how Stoyan Stefanov does it in his JavaScript Patterns book which I to be found very good. (Also shows how he does comments that allows for auto generated API documentation, and how to add a method to a custom object's prototype):

/**
* My js app
*
* @module myapp
*/

/** @namespace Namespace for MYAPP classes and functions. */
var MYAPP = MYAPP || {};

/**
* A maths utility
* @namespace MYAPP
* @class math_stuff
*/
MYAPP.math_stuff = {

    /**
    * Sums 2 numbers
    *
    * @method sum
    * @param {Number} a First number
    * @param {Number} b Second number
    * @return {Number} Sum of the inputs
    */
    sum: function (a, b) {
        return a + b;
    },

    /**
    * Multiplies 2 numbers
    *
    * @method multi
    * @param {Number} a First number
    * @param {Number} b Second number
    * @return {Number} The inputs multiplied
    */
    multi: function (a, b) {
        return a * b;
    }
};

/**
* Constructs Person objects
* @class Person
* @constructor
* @namespace MYAPP
* @param {String} First name
* @param {String} Last name
*/
MYAPP.Person = function (first, last) {

    /**
    * First name of the Person
    * @property first_name
    * @type String
    */
    this.first_name = first;

    /**
    * Last name of the Person
    * @property last_name
    * @type String
    */
    this.last_name = last;
};

/**
* Return Person's full name
*
* @method getName
* @return {String} First name + last name
*/
MYAPP.Person.prototype.getName = function () {
    return this.first_name + ' ' + this.last_name;
};
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1  
+1 for reading this book my favorite –  Mina Gabriel Nov 23 '13 at 3:08

I use this approach:-

var myNamespace = {}
myNamespace._construct = function()
{
    var staticVariable = "This is available to all functions created here"

    function MyClass()
    {
       //Depending on the class may build all the class here
       this.publicMethod = function()
       {
          //Do stuff
       }
    }
    //Alternatively may use prototype
    MyClass.prototype.altPublicMethod = function()
    {
        //Do stuff
    }

    function privateStuff()
    {
    }

    function publicStuff()
    {
       //code that may call other public and private functions
    }

    //List of things to place publically
    this.publicStuff = publicStuff
    this.MyClass = MyClass
}
myNamespace._construct()

//The following may or may not be in another file
myNamespace.subName = {}
myNamespace.subName._construct = function()
{
   //build namespace
}
myNamespace.subName._construct()

External code can then:-

var myClass = new myNamespace.MyClass();
var myOtherClass = new myNamepace.subName.SomeOtherClass();
myNamespace.subName.publicOtherStuff(someParameter);
share|improve this answer
    
Great detail! Thanks! Just wondering what's your take on Namespace.js. I've never used it myself, so I'm wondering if someone with your knowledge/skill/experience would consider using it. –  John Oct 19 '10 at 14:43
    
I like it! On the other hand I get exception on first line of this external code, saying: 'myNameSpace.MyClass' [undefined] is not constructor. maybe it depends in JS implementation? :/ –  yoosiba Feb 16 '11 at 12:37
    
@yossiba: Possibly. The code above is fairly standard stuff. In standard JS any function can be used as a constructor, there is nothing you need to do to mark a function as specifically for being used as a constructor. Are you using an unusual flavor like ActionScript or something? –  AnthonyWJones Feb 16 '11 at 12:55
    
@Anthony its better to use var MYNAMESPACE = MYNAMESPACE || {}; just using var myNamespace = {} is unsafe and moreover its better to declare your namespace in caps –  paul Aug 4 '11 at 22:55
7  
@paul: "Better" can be quite subjective. I hate reading code that SHOUTS at me so I avoid using identifiers that use all uppercase. Whilst ns = ns || {} might seem more defensive it can lead to other unexpected results. –  AnthonyWJones Aug 5 '11 at 12:22

If anyone find this interesting,

var namespace = {};
namespace.module1 = (function(){

    var self = {};
    self.initialized = false;

    self.init = function(){
        setTimeout(self.onTimeout, 1000)
    };

    self.onTimeout = function(){
        alert('onTimeout')
        self.initialized = true;
    };

    self.init(); /* if it need to auto-initialize, */
    /* you can also call 'namespace.module1.init();' from outside the module */
    return self;

})()

You can optionally declare a local variable same like self and assign local.onTimeout if you want it to be private.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Don't know why this hasn't been upvoted more, it's really easy to read and self-explanatory –  higuaro Dec 27 '12 at 21:52
    
This one's great, thanks! –  m1. Oct 28 '13 at 14:10
    
Simple,clear and great! –  rpax Aug 14 at 7:23

You can declare a simple function to providing namespaces.

function namespace(namespace) {
    var object = this, tokens = namespace.split("."), token;

    while (tokens.length > 0) {
        token = tokens.shift();

        if (typeof object[token] === "undefined") {
            object[token] = {};
        }

        object = object[token];
    }

    return object;
}

// Usage example
namespace("foo.bar").baz = "I'm a value!";
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for handling embedded namespaces –  virtualnobi Nov 21 '13 at 14:42
    
Came here for javascript.. was not disappointed. –  Todd Morrison Oct 4 at 3:04

I created namespace which is inspired by Erlang's modules. It is a very functional approach, but that is is how I write my js these days.

It gives a closure a global namespace and exposes a defined set functions within that closure.

(function(){

  namespace("images", previous, next);
  // ^^ this creates or finds a root object, images, and binds the two functions to it.
  // It works even though those functions are not yet defined.

  function previous(){ ... }

  function next(){ ... }

  function find(){ ... } // a private function

})();
share|improve this answer

After porting several of my libraries to different projects, and having to constantly be changing the top level (statically named) namespace, I've switched to using this small (open source) helper function for defining namespaces.

global_namespace.Define('startpad.base', function(ns) {
    var Other = ns.Import('startpad.other');
    ....
});

Description of the benefits are at my blog post. You can grab the source code here.

One of the benefits I really like is isolation between modules with respect to load order. You can refer to an external module BEFORE it is loaded. And the object reference you get will be filled in when the code is available.

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1  
I've created an improved version (2.0) of the namespace library: code.google.com/p/pageforest/source/browse/appengine/static/src/… –  mckoss Aug 29 '10 at 1:49

http://github.com/smith/namespacedotjs

You gotta check that out!! :D

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2  
The link is dead; can you find another one for NS.JS? –  Will Aug 12 '10 at 18:56
    
Found it, and fixed the answer... and then noticed Rudy's answer below, which gives a lot more information: stackoverflow.com/questions/881515/… –  StriplingWarrior Oct 12 '10 at 15:54

I've written another namespacing library that works a bit more like packages / units do in other languages. It allows you to create a package of Javascript code and the reference that package from other code:

hello.js

Package("hello", [], function() {
  function greeting() {
    alert("Hello World!");
  }
  // expose function greeting to other packages
  Export("greeting", greeting);
});

example.js

Package("example", ["hello"], function(greeting) {
  // greeting is available here
  greeting();  // Alerts: "Hello World!"
});

Only the second file needs to be included in the page its dependencies (hello.js in this example) will automatically be loaded and the objects exported from those dependencies will be used to populate the arguments of the callback function.

You can find the related project here: Packages JS

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If using a Makefile you can do this.

// prelude.hjs
billy = new (
    function moduleWrapper () {
    const exports = this;

// postlude.hjs
return exports;
})();

// someinternalfile.js
function bob () { console.log('hi'); }
exports.bob = bob;

// clientfile.js
billy.bob();

I prefer to use a Makefile anyway once I get to about 1000 lines because I can effectively comment out large swaths of code by removing a single line in the makefile. It makes it easy to fiddle with stuff. Also, with this technique the namespace only appears once in the prelude so it's easy to change and you don't have to keep repeating it inside the library code.

A shell script for live development in the browser when using a makefile:

while (true); do make; sleep 1; done

Add this as a make task 'go' and you can 'make go' to keep your build updated as you code.

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YUI has a YUI.namespace function to do this

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