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I'm working on a set of database tables in Oracle and trying to figure out a way to enforce referential integrity with slightly polymorphic data.

Specifically, I have a bunch of different tables--hypothetically, let's say I have Apples, Bananas, Oranges, Tangerines, Grapes, and a hundred more types of fruit. Now I'm trying to make a table which describes performing steps involving a fruit. So I want to insert one row that says "eat Apple ID 100", then another row which says "peel Banana ID 250", then another row which says "refrigerate Tangerine ID 500", and so on.

Historically, we've done this in two ways:

1 - Include a column for each possible type of fruit. Use a check constraint to ensure that all but one column is NULL. Use foreign keys to ensure referential integrity to our fruit. So in my hypothetical example, we'd have a table with columns ACTION, APPLEID, BANANAID, ORANGEID, TANGERINEID, and GRAPEID. For the first action, we'd have a row 'Eat', 100, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL. For the second action, we'd have 'Peel', NULL, 250, NULL, NULL, NULL. etc. etc.

This approach is great for getting all of Oracle's RI benefits automatically, but it just doesn't scale to a hundred types of fruit. You end up getting too many columns to be practical. Just figuring out which type of fruit you are dealing with becomes a challenge.

2 - Include a column with the name of the fruit, and a column with a fruit ID. This works also, but there isn't any way (AFAIK) to have Oracle enforce the validity of the data in any way. So our columns would be ACTION, FRUITTYPE, and FRUITID. The row data would be 'Eat', 'Apple', 100, then 'Peel', 'Banana', 250, etc. But there's nothing preventing someone from deleting Apple ID 100, or inserting a step saying 'Eat', 'Apple', 90000000 even though we don't have an Apple with that ID.

Is there a way to avoid maintaining a separate column per each individual fruit type, but still preserve most the benefits of foreign keys? (Or technically, I could be convinced to use a hundred columns if I can hide the complexity with a neat trick somehow. It just has to look sane in day-to-day use.)

CLARIFICATION: In our actual logic, the "fruits" are totally disparate tables with very little commonality. Think customers, employees, meetings, rooms, buildings, asset tags, etc. The list of steps is supposed to be free-form and allow users to specify actions on any of these things. If we had one table which contained each of these unrelated things, I wouldn't have a problem, but it would also be a really weird design.

share|improve this question
    
So the intent is to have a "Recipe" table with a set of Recipe Actions? Such as "chop granny-smith apples," "slice cavendish bananas," "put granny-smith apples in bowl," "put cavendish bananas in bowl" etc? And presumably chop only works on apples, and slice only works on bananas, but put in bowl works on either, and some robot is going to use this recipe table to understand how to make a fruit salad? (sorry for dupe comment, can't edit the original for some reason) – Brian Jan 11 '12 at 19:58
    
@Brian: You can edit comments up to 5 minutes. But you can still delete the 1st comment. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jan 11 '12 at 21:48
    
@Brian: that's a pretty good way to describe what I asked. In actuality, a robot is going to be checking whether the bananas have been sliced, the apples have been chopped, and the grapes are put in a bowl. And once it recognizes that all these things have happened it will properly identify that we have a finished fruit salad. – StilesCrisis Jan 11 '12 at 23:52
1  
@StilesCrisis Excellent question! I was just thinking about how to solve something like this. I want to add a rating/voting functionality and associate with it various kinds of, as you say, disparate tables so we can easily adding voting functionality to many things. I can't think of a way to maintain RI though. I'd like to be able to do conditional foreign key constraints based on the type, but from the answer you got it doesn't look possible. Anyway, thanks for asking. – Jere Jan 17 '12 at 20:52
    
Do let me know of you find a way. I'm still stumped. – StilesCrisis Jan 18 '12 at 0:14

It's not clear to me why you need to identify the FRUIT_TYPE on the TASKS table. On the face of it that's just a poor (de-normalised) data model.

In my experience, the best way of modelling this sort of data is with a super-type for the generic thing (FRUIT in your example) and sub-types for the specifics (APPLE, GRAPE, BANANA). This allows us to store common attributes in one place while recording the particular attributes for each instance.

Here is the super-type table:

create table fruits
    (fruit_id number not null
         , fruit_type varchar2(10) not null
         , constraint fruit_pk primary key (fruit_id)
         , constraint fruit_uk unique (fruit_id, fruit_type)
         , constraint fruit_ck check (fruit_type in ('GRAPE', 'APPLE', 'BANANA'))
    )
/

FRUITS has a primary key and a compound unique key. We need the primary key for use in foreign key constraints, because compound keys are a pain in the neck. Except when they are not, which is the situation with these sub-type tables. Here we use the unique key as the reference, because by constraining the value of FRUIT_TYPE in the sub-type we can guarantee that records in the GRAPES table map to FRUITS records of type 'GRAPE', etc.

create table grapes
    (fruit_id number not null
         , fruit_type varchar2(10) not null  default 'GRAPE'
         , seedless_yn  not null char(1) default 'Y'
         , colour varchar2(5) not null
         , constraint grape_pk primary key (fruit_id)
         , constraint grape_ck check (fruit_type = 'GRAPE')
         , constraint grape_fruit_fk foreign key (fruit_id, fruit_type)
                references fruit  (fruit_id, fruit_type)
         , constraint grape_flg_ck check (seedless_yn in ('Y', 'N'))
    )
/

create table apples
    (fruit_id number not null
         , fruit_type varchar2(10) not null
         , apple_type  varchar2(10) not null default 'APPLE'
         , constraint apple_pk primary key (fruit_id)
         , constraint apple_ck check (fruit_type = 'APPLE')
         , constraint apple_fruit_fk foreign key (fruit_id, fruit_type)
                references fruit  (fruit_id, fruit_type)
         , constraint apple_type_ck check (apple_type in ('EATING', 'COOKING', 'CIDER'))
    )
/

create table bananas
    (fruit_id number not null
         , fruit_type varchar2(10) not null default 'BANANA'
         , constraint banana_pk primary key (fruit_id)
         , constraint banana_ck check (fruit_type = 'BANANA')
         , constraint banana_fruit_fk foreign key (fruit_id, fruit_type)
                references fruit  (fruit_id, fruit_type)
    )
/

In 11g we can make FRUIT_TYPE a virtual column for the sub-type and do away with the check constraint.

So, now we need a table for task types ('Peel', 'Refrigerate', 'Eat ', etc).

create table task_types
    (task_code varchar2(4) not null
     , task_descr varchar2(40) not null
     , constraint task_type_pk primary key (task_code)
    )
/

And the actual TASKS table is a simple intersection between FRUITS and TASK_TYPES.

create table tasks
    (task_code varchar2(4) not null
     , fruit_id number not null
     , constraint task_pk primary key (task_code, fruit_id)
     , constraint task_task_fk ask foreign key (task_code)
            references task_types (task_code)
     , constraint task_fruit_fk foreign key (fruit_id)
            references fruit (fruit_id)
/

If this does not satisfy your needs please edit your question to include more information.


"... if you want different tasks for different fruits..."

Yes I wondered whether that was the motivation underlying the OP's posted design. But usually workflow is a lot more difficult than that: some tasks will apply to all fruits, some will only apply to (say) fruits which come in bunches, others will only be relevant to bananas.


"In our actual logic, the 'fruits' are totally disparate tables with very little commonality. Think customers, employees, meetings, rooms, buildings, asset tags, etc. The list of steps is supposed to be free-form and allow users to specify actions on any of these things."

So you have a bunch of existing tables. You want to be able to assign records from these tables to tasks in a freewheeling style yet be able to guarantee the identify of the specific record which owns the task.

I think you still need a generic table to hold an ID for the actor in the task, but you will need to link it to the other tables somehow. Here is how I might approach it:

Soem sample existing tables:

create table customers
    (cust_id number not null
         , cname varchar2(100) not null
         , constraint cust_pk primary key (fruit_id)
    )
/

create table employees
    (emp_no number not null
         , ename varchar2(30) not null
         , constraint emp_pk primary key (fruit_id)
    )
/

A generic table to hold actors:

create table actors
    (actor_id number not null
         , constraint actor_pk primary key (actor_id)
    )
/

Now, you need intersection tables to associate your existing tables with the new one:

create table cust_actors
    (cust_id number not null
         , actor_id number not null
         , constraint cust_actor_pk primary key (cust_id, actor_id)
         , constraint cust_actor_cust_fk foreign key (cust_id)
                references customers (cust_id)
         , constraint cust_actor_actor_fk foreign key (actor_id)
                references actors (actor_id)
    )
/

create table emp_actors
    (emp_no number not null
         , actor_id number not null
         , constraint emp_actor_pk primary key (emp_no, actor_id)
         , constraint emp_actor_emp_fk foreign key (emp_no)
                references eployees (emp_no)
         , constraint cust_actor_actor_fk foreign key (actor_id)
                references actors (actor_id)
    )
/

The TASKS table is rather unsurprising, given what's gone before:

create table tasks
    (task_code varchar2(4) not null
     , actor_id number not null
     , constraint task_pk primary key (task_code, actor_id)
     , constraint task_task_fk ask foreign key (task_code)
            references task_types (task_code)
     , constraint task_actor_fk foreign key (actor_id)
            references actors (actor_id)
/

I agree all those intersection tables look like a lot of overhead but there isn't any other way to enforce foreign key constraints. The additional snag is creating ACTORS and CUSTOMER_ACTORS records every time you create a record in CUSTOMERS. Ditto for deletions. The only good news is that you can generate all the code you need.

Is this solution better than a table with one hundred optional foreign keys? Perhaps not: it's a matter of taste. But I like it better than having no foreign keys at all. If there is on euniversal truth in database practice it is this: databases which rely on application code to enforce relational integrity are databases riddled with children referencing the wrong parent or referencing no parent at all.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with all. Additionally, if you want different tasks for different fruits, you also need the fruit_type in table tasks and task_types and the FKs to be: Foreign Key (fruit_id, fruit_type) References fruit(fruit_id, fruit_type) and Foreign Key (task_code, fruit_type) References task_types(task_code, fruit_type) – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jan 11 '12 at 13:11
    
There isn't a Fruits table in my original example. It doesn't make sense in our model to add one. To simplify the example I just used fruits, but in reality the tables are totally unrelated concepts ("customers", "rooms", "meetings", "salaries") and there is no common ancestor table that points to all of them. The list of steps needs to be able to talk about all of these concepts though ("visit a customer", "do maintenance on a building", "find salaries > $100000", etc). – StilesCrisis Jan 11 '12 at 16:09
    
I'm thinking this approach might be my best shot... I'll try to adapt it to what I've actually got and see if it works. If I can get somewhere with it, I'll award the answer credit. Thanks for all the detail. – StilesCrisis Jan 11 '12 at 17:40
    
@StilesCrisis: It appears you want to have both: 1) Multiple different tables, (created by users perhaps), with different types of data. 2) Enforce Integrity in this structure. I suggest you search and read about 6NF – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jan 11 '12 at 21:51
1  
I was not familiar with 6NF. I did a little bit of reading on it but I don't think it's for us. We have buckets and loads of existing data and I would be shot if I tried to break it up into hundreds of tiny tables. If it's going to be that complicated we're better off giving up on RI for this data (as much as it pains me). – StilesCrisis Jan 11 '12 at 23:59

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