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I am novice in process/task management. I would like to schedule two tasks. suppose,

fun1()  
{  
    printf("It will be printed in every 1 min \n");  
}  
fun2()  
{  
    printf("It will be printed in every 2 min \n");  
}  
main()  
{  
    fun1();  
    fun2();  
}

So how to schedule them, so that I will get my desired output.

I want it to run in Code::Blocks (Windows). I want fun1 to run 1 min and fun2 to run every 2 mins. If I can do it in two separate process also then tell me how can I do it. Do I need to use semaphore, mutex and all?

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3  
creating separate threads with timer activation comes to my mind. you can't do it in standard C without the help of operating system –  Donotalo Jan 11 '12 at 8:04
2  
So, what you want is for fun1 to run every minute and fun2 to run every 2 minutes? And did you mean for them to be functions, or do you want separate processes, as your question implies? Lastly, what operating system? –  cha0site Jan 11 '12 at 8:06
    
Please read this to get an overview on what is scheduling? –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Jan 11 '12 at 8:06
    
You've tagged this [operating-system], but forgotten to tell us which operating system you're using. Was the tag intended to convey that you're trying to write an operating system of your own in C? –  Cody Gray Jan 11 '12 at 8:07
1  
@Donotalo: I've added the setjmp abuse as an answer, since the asker insists on Standard C. You might want to take a look =) –  cha0site Jan 11 '12 at 9:47

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your example is trivial and can be scheduled without resorting to any OS provided scheduling or even OS timing services, however in general (for non-trivial requirements) in Windows, you would use multi-threading and allow the OS to perform the scheduling. main() is already a thread, so you only need create one other. In its simplest form:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h>

DWORD WINAPI OneMinthread( LPVOID lpParam ) 
{  
    for(;;)
    {
        printf("It will be printed in every 1 min \n");  
        Sleep(60000) ;
    }
}  

int main()  
{  
    CreateThread( NULL, 0, OneMinthread, 0, 0, 0) ;
    for(;;)
    {
        printf("It will be printed in every 2 min \n");  
        Sleep(120000) ;
    }
}  

See Creating Threads for a more complete treatment of threading in Win32. Be aware that the .Net framework also provides a simpler class based interface to threading.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right but, I wanted to write the code in standard C. I use Code::Blocks IDE. It does not support sleep() or delay(). –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Jan 11 '12 at 12:00
1  
@Rasmi Ranjan Nayak: This doesn't sound correct. Sleep() is a Windows API function, exactly like CreateThread. It should not be connected to the IDE in any way. On the other hand if you are not writing Win32 native application, that means you are using some library (wxWidgets ?), so look into it's documentation for sleep and threading support. –  LiMar Jan 11 '12 at 14:08
    
@LiMar: May be you are right. But when I have tried it gave me an error. Even you can try the same in Code::Blocks. writing a simple program. 'main() { sleep(1000); printf("Sleep executed"); } ' –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Jan 11 '12 at 14:19
    
@Rasmi Ranjan Nayak : 1) Sleep() and sleep() are different ! Letter case does matter in C.; 2) Choose right project type in Code::Blocks - decide if it will be Win32 or GTK+ or smth else; 3) Include all needed headers into your C files - just follow some tutorial if you are new to C. –  LiMar Jan 11 '12 at 14:25
    
sleep() is not what I wrote. Sleep() is what I said! Copy and paste the code and build it. I have tested it in VC++, but it is entirely standard C code and uses the Win32 API which should be available to any Win32 toolchain. The fact that you are using Code::Blocks is irrelevant, of more concern is what underlying tool-chain it is using (it is configurable to any). If it is using MinGW/GCC, then this code will work as posted. –  Clifford Jan 11 '12 at 19:36

Edit: This is getting upvoted, so I'd like to add a clarification for posterity. This isn't a good way to solve this problem - you would never want to do this by hand. Co-operative user threads are nice, and can be used to implement clever things like coroutines, but if you want to do that you should use a library like libcoroutine that handles the hairy bits for you. However, while this isn't a practical solution, it still presents an interesting idea and is an interesting example of scheduling and the limitations of pure C99.

This is a bad answer. However, it is platform-independent, and moreover, only uses functions that are defined in the C99 standard.

On the other hand, it hogs the CPU (there are no sleep functions in C99, so we have to busy-wait), uses what I can only call magic to reserve space on the stack, and completely abuses setjmp. It even uses global variables! And yet, it works.

The technique is named co-operative user threads, also called fibers. I implemented it, as I mentioned, using setjmp and longjmp. The context_switch does simple Round Robin scheduling.

This is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <setjmp.h>
#include <time.h>

static jmp_buf jmp[2];
static int cur;

void context_switch()
{
    /* sleep(1) */ /* C99 doesn't have any sleeping functions */
    if (!setjmp(jmp[cur])) {
        if ((sizeof(jmp)/sizeof(*jmp)) == ++cur)
            cur = 0;
        longjmp(jmp[cur], 1);
    }
}

void fun2()
{
    char cushion[1000]; /* reserve some stack space */
    time_t old_time, new_time;
    cushion[0] = '@'; /* don't optimize my cushion away */
    old_time = time(NULL);
        cur = 1; /* the first thread to context switch is this one */
    setjmp(jmp[1]);
    while (1) {
        context_switch();
        new_time = time(NULL);
        if ((new_time - old_time) > (2 * 60)) {
            old_time = new_time;
            printf("Printed every 2 minutes\n");
        }
    }
}

void fun1()
{
    char cushion[1000]; /* reserve some stack space */
    time_t old_time, new_time;
    cushion[0] = '@'; /* don't optimize my cushion away */
    if (!setjmp(jmp[0]))
        fun2();
    old_time = time(NULL);
    while (1) {
        context_switch();
        new_time = time(NULL);
        if ((new_time - old_time) > (1 * 60)) {
            old_time = new_time;
            printf("Printed every 1 minute\n");
        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    fun1();
    return 0;
}

And this is the output I get:

$ gcc -ggdb -std=c99 -o silly silly_setjmp.c 
$ ./silly
Printed every 1 minute
Printed every 2 minutes
Printed every 1 minute
Printed every 1 minute
...
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. the idea is very interesting. i'm not having enough time to read and check, will do that later. :) –  Donotalo Jan 11 '12 at 9:56
    
@cha0site: Ya It's quite interesting idea. Thanks –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Jan 11 '12 at 10:50
    
It illustrates setjmp() very nicely, I just had to upvote. Sorry. –  Prof. Falken Feb 8 '12 at 12:59
    
upvote because of awesomeness... didn't know that this is possible in pure C99 without libs/OS help... although I never use setjmp... that may explain why. –  Bort Feb 9 '12 at 10:17
    
+1 just for the setjmp usage –  Lefteris Feb 9 '12 at 15:16

Well, it would be better if you could specify your operating system (or the requirement of crossplatformness)

Yo can write:

  • OS dependent code
  • Cross-platform code (working on multiple OSs)

For the multitasking each of above can use :

  • Threads or
  • Processes
  • Timers

Examle. POSIX compatible OS (Like Linux), Using processes

void fun1()
{  
   for(;;)     
   {
     printf("It will be printed in every 1 min \n");
     sleep(60);
   }
}
void fun2()
{  
   for(;;)     
   {
     printf("It will be printed in every 2 min \n");
     sleep(2*60);
   }
}
int main()
{
  pid_t pID = fork();
  if ( 0 == pID ) // new, child process
  {
      func1();
  }
  else if(pID<0)
  {
      printf("Fork failed 1\n");
  }
  else //parent process succeeded forking and now continue running
  {
      func2();
  }


  return 0;
}

Other cases:

  • POSIX(Linux/UNIX) + threads: use pthread_create function to create threads
  • Windows + threads/processes: use CreateThread() or CreateProcess() function
  • Crossplatform: use special high level libraries like GLIB to create threads/processes
share|improve this answer
    
I am working in Code block IDE, Windows platform –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Jan 11 '12 at 8:27
    
So my example is a bit irrelevent for you. You might want to add some "windows" tag to your question. Look for examples of CreateThread() usage, there is a lot in the network. –  LiMar Jan 11 '12 at 8:39
    
sleep(60) is bad: the execution of printf takes some time, so you may get less than 60 prints per minute! –  Peter Miehle Jan 11 '12 at 9:07
    
well man.... there is even more - this program never stops, it does not handles signas, does not return error code if fails, etc. Because of all this it is called "EXAMPLE". And it demonstrates fork(). –  LiMar Jan 11 '12 at 9:13

The following creates two threads. Thread #1 prints once in a minute and thread #2 prints once in 2 minutes. These threads will be scheduled by the scheduler of your OS. In Linux, we have cfs to do the scheduling. And to get an overview on scheduling, read this

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>

#define NOTHREADS 2

void * fun1(void *thread_id)
{
    int i;
    int *id = (int *) thread_id;

    while(1) {
        usleep(1000 * 1000 * 60);
        printf("1 minute \n");
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void * fun2(void *thread_id)
{
    int i;
    int *id = (int *) thread_id;

    while(1) {
        usleep(2000 * 1000 * 60);
        printf("2 minute \n");
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main()
{
    pthread_t tids[NOTHREADS];
    int ids[NOTHREADS] = {1, 2};
    int ret; 
    long t;
    int i;

    printf("Creating fun1 thread \n");
    ret = pthread_create(&tids[0], NULL, fun1, &ids[0]);
    if (ret) {
        printf("unable to create thread! \n");
        exit(-1);
    } 

    printf("Creating fun2 thread \n");
    ret = pthread_create(&tids[1], NULL, fun2, &ids[1]);
    if (ret) {
        printf("unable to create thread! \n");
        exit(-1);
    } 

    for (i=0 ; i<NOTHREADS; i++) {
        pthread_join(tids[i], NULL);
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);     

    return 0;
}

output:

$ gcc t.c -lpthread
$ ./a.out 
Creating fun1 thread 
Creating fun2 thread 
1 minute 
2 minute 
1 minute 
1 minute 
^C
$ 

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
I think you did a great piece of help. This really helped me understand UNIX OS. But still I have one more question, without creating thread, can we do the same in Standard C? –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Jan 11 '12 at 8:23
    
@user1105805 I'm glad! Thanks! :) –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Jan 11 '12 at 8:25
    
@user1105805 To create threads, you need a thread library like pthread which provides basic infrastructure to create, manage, monitor and delete threads. –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Jan 11 '12 at 8:39
3  
C11 (the new version of C which was finalized and published about 2 weeks ago) has some minimal thread support in <threads.h>. –  cha0site Jan 11 '12 at 10:08
    
@RasmiRanjanNayak, I hope you are aware that Windows and Standard C are not exactly the same thing. Your question is tagged Windows. –  Prof. Falken Feb 7 '12 at 18:11

The simplest, though not accurate, way of doing this is to use the POSIX sleep()function inside an infinite loop.

while(1)
{
    fun1();
    sleep(60);
    fun1();
    fun2();
    sleep(60);
}

If you have more complex tasks to implement, you may be interested in POSIX threads and POSIX timers.

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1  
Since "Windows" was mentioned in teh question, the Win32 Sleep(60000) would be required rather than POSIX sleep(60) –  Clifford Jan 11 '12 at 11:20
    
I hope that Windows includes POSIX interface, with a lowercase sleep() –  mouviciel Jan 11 '12 at 12:36
1  
Hope all you like; it doesn't. And it is always useful to answer the question in the terms asked; especially for a novice who may not understand that target environments have different libraries and APIs. There are (partial solutions)[msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/y23kc048.aspx], or you could use Cygwin, but in this case it is a sledge-hammer to crack a nut, especially when the Win32 Sleep function having millisecond resolution is in fact more flexible. unsigned sleep(unsigned s){Sleep(s/1000); return 0; } if you really insist ;-) –  Clifford Jan 11 '12 at 19:51

I think you should use a scheduling algorithm like Round-Robin, or make your own algorithm.
Here you find some algorithms http://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/5.1/Virtual_Server_Administration/s2-lvs-sched-VSA.html
You cand find examples, how they are implemented, and which to use.

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This approach is through setjmp and longjmp operations using sleep command.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<setjmp.h>

main()
{
        jmp_buf env;
        int i;

        i=setjmp(env);
        if(i==1)
        {
                sleep(1);
                printf("It will be printed in every 1 min \n");
                longjmp(env,3);
        }
        else if(i==2){
                printf("It will be printed in every 2 min \n");
                longjmp(env,1);
        }
        else if(i==3)
        {
                sleep(1);
                printf("It will be printed in every 1 min \n");
                longjmp(env,2);
        }
        longjmp(env,1);
}
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