Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Seeing this thread I wrote the following: How do I convert from void * back to int

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
using namespace std;

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    void* port = (void*) atoi (argv[1]);

    cout << "\nvalue: \n" << atoi (argv[1]) << "\n";

    int h = *((int *)port);
    cout << h;
}

output:

anisha@linux-dopx:~/> ./a.out 323

value: 
323
Segmentation fault
anisha@linux-dopx:~/>

GCC

What's the point that I am missing?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think casting from int to void* is intentional at all. That alone causes the seg fault when you try to dereference void* due to unallocated memeory at location 323. –  ksming Jan 11 '12 at 8:18
    
@ksming which line to change? –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 8:42
    
The difference with the question that you link to is that there a cast from int* is done to void*, so there you should cast back to int*. You do a cast from int to void* so in this case you should cast back to int. However, try avoid this casting. –  stefaanv Jan 11 '12 at 9:06
    
See my comment on Luchian's answer to avoid the casting altogether if you need this for creating threads. –  stefaanv Jan 11 '12 at 9:19
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Okay, please ignore my previous answer. Instead of (char*)port - (char*)0, please do the following:

int h = *(int *)(&port);

You're getting the address of port:

&port

Casting the address to an int *:

(int *)(&port)

Then dereferencing the address to get back the integer value you put into port:

*(int *)(&port)
share|improve this answer
    
this works. :) Thanks. In my original post I didn't know what I was doing! Swift answers on SO have spoiled me. :D –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 9:33
1  
No worries. This was educational for me, as well. –  Alex Reynolds Jan 11 '12 at 9:37
add comment

Ignoring potential issues with the intermediate conversions, you start with an int and end up treating it as if it were int*. In other words, you treat the result of atoi() as an address, and try to read the memory at that address.

share|improve this answer
    
But this void* port = atoi (argv[1]); results in error: invalid conversion from ‘int’ to ‘void*’ –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 8:39
add comment

I made the following adjustment, based on this SO answer:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
using namespace std;

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    void *port = (void *) atoi(argv[1]);

    cout << "\nvalue: \n" << atoi (argv[1]) << "\n";

    int h = (char*)port - (char*)0;    
    cout << h;
}

Result:

$ g++ -Wall test.cpp
$ ./a.out 323

value: 
323
323
share|improve this answer
    
yes, it worked, thanks. could you explain it? (char*)port - (char*)0; –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 8:51
    
This seems like undefined behavior to me: arithmetic with a pointer that points nowhere and a null-pointer that doesn't necessary points to address 0x00000000... I can see how it should work with most common compilers. –  stefaanv Jan 11 '12 at 9:11
    
My thoughts on this may be wrong, but I'll throw this out there for others to comment on. The subtraction operator can take two pointers of the same type. Subtracting the address of '0' from the address of a char * of port (here, really an int) returns the number of 1-byte char elements between them, the number being implicitly cast back to an int. (Try replacing char * with int * and your answer h should be divided by sizeof(int), often four bytes.) –  Alex Reynolds Jan 11 '12 at 9:20
    
Please ignore this answer and see my other one. I think my newer answer makes more sense and is more readable. –  Alex Reynolds Jan 11 '12 at 9:30
add comment

Change below line

void* port = (void*) atoi (argv[1]); 

to

int port = atoi (argv[1]); 
share|improve this answer
    
that results in error: invalid conversion from ‘int’ to ‘void*’ –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 8:38
    
this is c++ - strict typecasting. –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 8:51
add comment

You try to typecast port to an int pointer, but it is not a pointer. It is a value. You are using 323 as a pointer. If you want to get an int * then either typecast argv[1] or a pointer to port. Port should also probably not be declared as a void * as it is processed to an int in atoi(), it should probably be simply an int.

share|improve this answer
    
I "need to" declare port as void *. I want to get an int as a answer. whic line to correct? –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 8:41
add comment

You're dereferencing a pointer which points to memory you don't own, which is undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
which line should I correct? –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 8:39
    
@AnishaKaul it's not a specific line, it's the logic that's faulty. void* port = (void*) atoi (argv[1]); this gives you a pointer to memory you don't own, which you're trying to de-reference. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 11 '12 at 8:42
    
actually, the port needs to be passed as a void pointer to a function "pthread_create". That's why I typecasted it. –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 8:45
1  
@anisha: there are discussions about this, but I think passing to pthread_create should be done by dynamic memory: int* pArg = new int; *pArg = atoi(...); pthread_create(...pArg...); and delete the argument inside the new thread. It is not the most C++-like, but it respects the void* parameter. –  stefaanv Jan 11 '12 at 9:17
    
@stefaanv Alright, I'll try that, thanks. –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 11 '12 at 9:20
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.