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I have following relation in my tables

item.rb

has_one :item_shipping_detail

item_shipping_detail.rb

belongs_to  :item
has_many :shipping_statuses

status.rb

belongs_to  :item_shipping_detail

Ex. Data

items

id   title     city      state             country
 1   Title1    Nagpur    Maharashtra       India

item_shipping_details

id   item_id    price     description
 1   1          10        Electronic

Statuses

id   item_shipping_detail_id    status_city     status_state   status_country  created_at 
 1   1                           Mumbai         Maharashtra    India           2012-01-09 07:58:16
 2   1                           Akola          Maharashtra    India           2012-01-10 07:58:16
 3   1                           Nagpur         Maharashtra    India           2012-01-11 07:58:16

I want the following result (item, item_shipping_details, statuses (LATEST or MAX)) using single query

id title city     state         country  price  description  status_city  status_state    status_country
 1 Title1 Nagpur  Maharashtra    India    10    Electronic   Nagpur       Maharashtra    India

JYI:- I am using Rails 2.3.8

share|improve this question
    
Are the three status_city columns in your statuses table actually status_city, status_state and status_country respectively? –  Mark Bannister Jan 11 '12 at 12:04
    
Yes Mark it's just typo but i edited the question. –  Salil Jan 17 '12 at 5:18
    
Which version of PostgreSQL are you using? –  Mark Bannister Jan 18 '12 at 7:38
    
ok it's my fault but is there any way to build a query for this? –  Salil Jan 21 '12 at 12:18
    
Gary's answer is definitely worth trying. –  Mark Bannister Jan 21 '12 at 13:10

5 Answers 5

Try:

select i.id,
       i.title,
       i.city,
       i.state,
       i.country,
       d.price,
       d.description,
       s.status_city,
       s.status_state,
       s.status_country
from items i
left join item_shipping_details d on i.id = d.item_id
left join 
   (select s1.* from statuses s1
     where not exists 
           (select * from statuses s2
        where 
                s2.item_shipping_detail_id = s1.item_shipping_detail_id 
                and s2.created_at> s1.created_at) )  s
on d.id = s.item_shipping_detail_id

The where clause on the subselect filters out any record where there is a newer record. This is effectively the same as Mark Bannister's query (which works fine on my Postgresql 9.1 database), but doesn't use the partition functions.

It probably isn't as efficient as partition functions so if you can work out why yours isn't running (maybe a 8.4 compatibility setting or something?) I'd go with his query.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I have now deleted my answer, as Salil has revealed that the result of a select version(); statement is "PostgreSQL 8.3.8 on i386-redhat-linux-gnu, compiled by GCC gcc (GCC) 4.3.2 20081105 (Red Hat 4.3.2-7) ". In other words, he is running a version of Postgres which (from comments on the answer to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1872705/… ) does not support Window Functions. –  Mark Bannister Jan 21 '12 at 10:24
    
I also upvoted you but this is too slow, is there any efficient way to do that i have very large amount of data. –  Salil Jan 23 '12 at 4:48
    
To address performance issues we're gonna need a lot more information. How many rows in each table? What fields are indexed? Are you querying for whole table or an individual item? –  Gary Jan 23 '12 at 10:39
    
Actually it might be worth raising as a separate question so more people can see it. –  Gary Jan 23 '12 at 10:52

Use DISTINCT ON, a postgresql extension:

select distinct on(i.id, d.id)
   i.id,
   i.title,
   i.city,
   i.state,
   i.country,
   d.price,
   d.description,
   s.status_city,
   s.status_state,
   s.status_country
from items i
left join item_shipping_details d on i.id = d.item_id
left join statuses s on s.item_shipping_detail_id = d.id
order by i.id, d.id, s.created_at desc

Also consider standard syntax:

select * from (
select i.id,
   i.title,
   i.city,
   i.state,
   i.country,
   d.price,
   d.description,
   s.status_city,
   s.status_state,
   s.status_country,
   row_number() over(partition by d.id, i.id order by s.created_at desc) as rn
from items i
left join item_shipping_details d on i.id = d.item_id
left join statuses s on s.item_shipping_detail_id = d.id
) tab where tab.rn = 1
share|improve this answer
    
Appear that the OP is using 8.3.8 which doesn't have window functions. –  MatBailie Jan 23 '12 at 12:07
    
"PostgreSQL Version is 9.1.2 – Salil Jan 19 at 6:02" . Also, the DISTINCT ON version is relevant from at least 7.1 –  maniek Jan 23 '12 at 12:28
    
I only commented on window functions, not DISTINCT ON :) Regading the version, check first comment to Gary's answer. He may have originally stated 9.1.2, but then he helpfully changed his mind in a comment on a now deleted answer... –  MatBailie Jan 23 '12 at 12:44

You must include "something" to the statuses, so you can select the latest status, like an arrival date or so. There is no way to answer your question before you provide that extra column.

share|improve this answer
    
See my Edited question, i have added 'created_at' column in statuses table. –  Salil Jan 11 '12 at 9:26

As it turns out that you're using 8.3.8 (from a comment on a deleted answer) you can't use row_number(). This means that I tend to join on a aggregate sub-query to determine which record is the newest. Something like...

SELECT
   i.id,
   i.title,
   i.city,
   i.state,
   i.country,
   d.price,
   d.description,
   s.status_city,
   s.status_state,
   s.status_country
FROM
  items                    i
LEFT JOIN
  item_shipping_details    d
    ON i.id = d.item_id
LEFT JOIN
  (SELECT item_shipping_detail_id, MAX(created_at) AS created_at FROM statuses GROUP BY item_shipping_detail_id)   lookup
    ON lookup.item_shipping_detail_id = d.id
LEFT JOIN
  statuses                 s
    ON  s.item_shipping_detail_id = lookup.item_shipping_detail_id
    AND s.created_at              = lookup.created_at

Note: To optimise the sub-query and join, the statuses table does need to be indexed appropriately; (item_shipping_detail_id, created_at)

If you have an index on (item_shipping_detail_id, id) instead, and you can guarantee that a higher id always means a record is newer than one with a lower id, you can replace occurances of created_at with id in my query.

share|improve this answer

Try this

select distinct on(i.id, d.id)
   i.id,
   i.title,
   i.city,
   i.state,
   i.country,
   d.price,
   d.description,
   s.status_city,
   s.status_state,
   s.status_country
from items i
left join item_shipping_details d on i.id = d.item_id
left join statuses s on s.item_shipping_detail_id = d.id
where s.id = (select Max(id) as id from statuses where item_shipping_detail_id = d.id)
order by i.id, d.id desc
share|improve this answer
    
In my experience, this correlated sub-query approach is logically identical to but slower than joining on an uncorrelated sub-query. –  MatBailie Jan 23 '12 at 18:50

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