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I have two applications.

One is declaring permission and having single Activity:

Part of AndroidManifest.xml

        <intent-filter>
            <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

            <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
        </intent-filter>

        <intent-filter> 
         <action android:name="android.intent.action.VIEW" /> 
         <category android:name="android.intent.category.DEFAULT" /> 
         <category android:name="android.intent.category.BROWSABLE" /> 
         <data android:scheme="myapp"
             android:host="myapp.mycompany.com" /> 
        </intent-filter> 
    </activity>
</application>

The second declares that is uses permission

Part of AndroidManifest.xml

<uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="10" />
<uses-permission android:name="your.namespace.permission.TEST" />

<application

Part of Activity:

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);

    startActivity(new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW, Uri.parse("myapp://myapp.mycompany.com/index")));
}

I'm installing the application declaring permission, then I run the second application.

In a result I get security exception:

 01-11 09:46:55.249: E/AndroidRuntime(347): java.lang.RuntimeException: Unable to start activity ComponentInfo{your.namespace2/your.namespace2.UsingPErmissionActivity}: java.lang.SecurityException: Permission Denial: starting Intent { act=android.intent.action.VIEW dat=myapp://myapp.mycompany.com/index cmp=your.namespace/.DeclaringPermissionActivity } from ProcessRecord{407842c0 347:your.namespace2/10082} (pid=347, uid=10082) requires your.namespace.permission.TEST
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I just want to point out this vulneralbility: commonsware.com/blog/2014/02/12/… –  user1281750 Sep 5 at 11:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 45 down vote accepted

I created a test code you can use it and test your permissions. There are two applications PermissionTestClient which declares permission and protects its activity with this permission. Here is its manifest file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    package="com.testpackage.permissiontestclient"
    android:versionCode="1"
    android:versionName="1.0" >

    <uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="10" />
    <permission android:name="com.testpackage.mypermission" android:label="my_permission" android:protectionLevel="dangerous"></permission>

    <application
        android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
        android:label="@string/app_name" >
        <activity
            android:permission="com.testpackage.mypermission"
            android:name=".PermissionTestClientActivity"
            android:label="@string/app_name" >
            <intent-filter>
                <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

                <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
            </intent-filter>

            <intent-filter >
                <action android:name="com.testpackage.permissiontestclient.MyAction" />
                <category android:name="android.intent.category.DEFAULT" />                
            </intent-filter>
        </activity>
    </application>

</manifest>

There is nothing special in Activity file so I will not show it here.

PermissionTestServer application calls activity from PermissionTestClient. Here is its manifest file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="10" />
<uses-permission android:name="com.testpackage.mypermission"/>

<application
    android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
    android:label="@string/app_name" >
    <activity
        android:name=".PermissionTestServerActivity"
        android:label="@string/app_name" >
        <intent-filter>
            <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

            <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
        </intent-filter>
    </activity>
</application>

</manifest>

And Activity:

package com.testpackage.permissiontestserver;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.util.Log;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;
import android.widget.Button;

public class PermissionTestServerActivity extends Activity {
    private static final String TAG = "PermissionTestServerActivity";

    /** Called when the activity is first created. */
    Button btnTest;
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);

        btnTest = (Button) findViewById(R.id.btnTest);
        btnTest.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                Log.d(TAG, "Button pressed!");
                Intent in = new Intent();
                in.setAction("com.testpackage.permissiontestclient.MyAction");
                in.addCategory("android.intent.category.DEFAULT");
                startActivity(in);
            }
        });
    }
}

To test it just remove uses-permission from Server application. You'll get security violation error.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, my mistake was to put permission attribute only to <application> element. –  pixel Jan 11 '12 at 9:56
    
This does not work for me when I use android:protectionLevel="signature" in the PermissionTestClient, I use the permission on that apps launcher and get: Permission Denial: starting Intent { act=android.intent.action.MAIN cat=[android.intent.category.LAUNCHER] flg=0x10000000 cmp=my.package.foobar/.DashboardActivity } from null (pid=4070, uid=2000) requires my.custom.permission.ACCESS_ACTIVITY - so the app fails to launch it's own Activity 0_o –  fr1550n Jun 27 '13 at 8:54
1  
Signature level of permission means that your client and server should be signed with the same certificate. Try to launch the code using dangerous level and if everything is ok, then try to launch with signature. One more thing, if you use signature I think you need to export a signed apk files and then install them. –  Yury Jun 28 '13 at 7:24
    
I would like to inform everybody about a security vulnerabiity related to using custom permissions. See this commonsware post: commonsware.com/blog/2014/02/12/… –  user1281750 Jun 5 at 8:21
  • You need to create this permission in your base app's manifest by declaring it
  • make use of it in your base app too (optional)

for example:

<permission android:name="your.namespace.permission.TEST"
android:protectionLevel="normal" android:label="this is my custom permission" />

 <uses-permission android:name="your.namespace.permission.TEST" />
share|improve this answer
    
Concise and short and it works. Top voted answer is better but this is exactly what was asked in the question. One note thou, this is ALL you need to use custom permissions, becouse security manager takes care of the rest. –  PSIXO Aug 4 at 14:41

Defining custom permission is done using <Permission> tag.. Please follow the link below to use user defined permissions in application:

Declaring and Enforcing Permissions

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