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Accessing nested JavaScript objects with string key

Maybe the title is not clear enough, I just didn't know how to specify what I'm looking for and my English is really bad, sorry.

I'm trying to create function that returns object value, but also plays nice with nested objects. For example:

var obj = {
  foo: { bar: 'baz' }
};

I want to access the value of obj.foo.bar by suppling the string "foo.bar" to the function.

function(obj, path) {
  // Path can be "foo.bar", or just "foo".
}

Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by casperOne Jan 12 '12 at 13:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Consider this:

var obj = {
  foo: { bar: 'baz' }
};

function deepFind(obj, path) {
  var paths = path.split('.')
    , current = obj
    , i;

  for (i = 0; i < paths.length; ++i) {
    if (current[paths[i]] == undefined) {
      return undefined;
    } else {
      current = current[paths[i]];
    }
  }
  return current;
}

console.log(deepFind(obj, 'foo.bar'))
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@7elephant and qiao: Fails (throws error) if any part of the path evaluates null. That could be a feature or a bug, depending on your viewpoint. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Jan 11 '12 at 10:47
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This works correctly:

var deep_value = function(obj, path){
    for (var i=0, path=path.split('.'), len=path.length; i<len; i++){
        obj = obj[path[i]];
    };
    return obj;
};

Here is the proof / demo: jsfiddle.net/tadeck/5Pt2q/13/

EDIT: I have removed redundant variables, shortened the code.

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1  
beautiful. better than anything in the duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/6491463/… –  Steve Black Mar 20 '13 at 2:10
    
extended for array support. jsfiddle.net/5Pt2q/20 –  Steve Black Jul 30 '13 at 4:02
1  
@SteveBlack better how? It supports a more restricted syntax, and has no error checking for attempting to resolve a key that doesn't exist. –  Alnitak Aug 6 '13 at 8:16
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You'd want to split the string on the dot and then repeatedly index into the object, e.g. along the lines of:

function goDeep(obj, path) {
    var parts = path.split('.'),
        rv,
        index;
    for (rv = obj, index = 0; rv && index < parts.length; ++index) {
        rv = rv[parts[index]];
    }
    return rv;
}

Live example

That works because you can access the property of an object in a couple of different ways: There's dotted syntax using a literal (obj.foo), and there's bracketed syntax using a string (obj["foo"]). In the latter case, the string can be the result of any expression, it doesn't have to be a string literal. In in all of the, rv is set to the same value:

rv = obj.foo.bar;
// Or
rv = obj.foo["bar"];
// Or
f = "foo";
rv = obj[f].bar;
// Or
s = "b";
rv = obj.foo[s + "ar"];
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Surely, the requirement was not expressed, but might we not suspect that OP might equally well want a function call such as goDeep(myObj, 'bar[3].baz')? That may be out of scope for the current question... –  David Hedlund Jan 11 '12 at 10:09
1  
@DavidHedlund: Fair point, it may well be useful to check for the bracketed form within each part in order to be fully compatible with JavaScript's own syntax. I'll leave it as an exercise for the OP. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Jan 11 '12 at 10:11
    
(Well, not fully, as to do that you'd have to basically re-invent [or -shudder- use] eval. But say, mostly compatible with.) –  T.J. Crowder Jan 11 '12 at 10:38
    
Well granted, mostly compatible is probably preferable over fully compatible in this case :) –  David Hedlund Jan 11 '12 at 10:43
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something like:

function(obj, path) {
  var current=obj; 
  path.split('.').forEach(function(p){ current = current[p]; }); 
  return current;
}
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You mean something like this ? It is a recursive version

function recLookup(obj, path) {
    parts = path.split(".");
    if (parts.length==1){
        return obj[parts[0]];
    }
    return recLookup(obj[parts[0]], parts.slice(1).join("."));
}

See http://jsfiddle.net/kExSr/

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GOLD! I was able to use this to map a path /Root[1]/This/worked to an object {"Root[1]":This{worked:"value"}} . had to trim the leading / and change . to / but otherwise beautiful. –  Steve Black Mar 20 '13 at 2:05
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