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Really trivial I suppose, but I don't understand what index++ does. How would this be written in VB.net?

int index = 0;
foreach(String prop in props.Keys)
{
     pSpec.pathSet[index++] = prop;
}
pSpecs.Add(pSpec);
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I don't know VB.net but index++ will just increment the value of index, so you could image it as index = index + 1. cplus.about.com/od/glossar1/g/postincdefn.htm – RyanSullivan Jan 11 '12 at 10:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted
Dim index As Integer = 0
For Each prop As [String] In props.Keys
    index = index +1
    pSpec.pathSet(index) = prop
Next
pSpecs.Add(pSpec)
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Did you mean to write System.Math.Min(...) instead? – Nuffin Jan 11 '12 at 10:29
4  
Your code is not the same as in question. Incrementation should be after assignment. – MichaelMocko Jan 11 '12 at 10:37
2  
You've changed the meaning - effectively you've create a pre-increment rather than a post-increment. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 11 '12 at 10:38
    
The answer is correct, but the increment does need to be after the assignment. Thanks! – Tom Pickles Jan 11 '12 at 11:11

It's just a post-increment. Meaning it will return it's value and then increase it's value by 1.

pSpec.pathSet[index++] = prop;

in VB.net would most likely be just:

pSpec.pathSet[index] = prop
index = index + 1 // this would work
index += 1 // this would work too

It's just important to note that you can't do it inline that way (as you'll need the previous value).

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The increment operator (++) increments its operand by 1. The increment operator can appear before or after its operand:

It's is the same index = index +1;

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It's not the same - your code doesn't alter index. – George Duckett Jan 11 '12 at 10:34
    
This will always be at index 1 – V4Vendetta Jan 11 '12 at 10:35
    
Ops, you're right. My bad. – T23 Jan 11 '12 at 10:35
    
index = index++ won't do what you think (try it). It should just be index++ or index = index + 1 or index += 1 – George Duckett Jan 11 '12 at 10:38
    
You're right. I never noticed before, I wonder why though. edit: I just found out :). Thanks – T23 Jan 11 '12 at 10:42

well you will have to increment it in this fashion

index =index + 1;

or index +=1

If interested why no increment operator

Got this using this

Dim index As Integer = 0
For Each prop As [String] In props.Keys
    pSpec.pathSet(System.Math.Max(System.Threading.Interlocked.Increment(index),index - 1)) = prop
Next
pSpecs.Add(pSpec)
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index++ will increment index by 1.

I don't know much VB but you could do:

index = index + 1
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index++ returns the current value of index and after that, it increments the value of index.

In the first iteration, it will return 0 as value, and after it the value will be increased to 1. In the second iteration, it will return 1 as value, and after it the value will be increased to 2.

The '++' operator doesn't exist in VB, you have to increment it yourself.

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Is this what you are looking for

Dim index As Integer = 0
For Each prop As [String] In props.Keys
    pSpec.pathSet(System.Math.Max(System.Threading.Interlocked.Increment(index),index - 1)) = prop
Next
pSpecs.Add(pSpec)
share|improve this answer

index++ increments the value of index by 1. That syntax is not available in VB.NET (http://www.knowdotnet.com/articles/paulvick.html)

so index++ is the equivalent of index = index+1 your vb code should be something like:

{
 index = index+1
 pSpec.pathSet[index] = prop
}
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As mentioned this just increments the value.

++ is not a valid operator in VB.NET but the closest thing is probably:

index += 1

This was a nice change for anyone coming from VB6 because before we had to always use the longhand index = index + 1

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