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I have script that has some functions.

Can I run one of the function directly from command line?

something like

myScript.sh func()

?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If the script only defines the functions and does nothing else, you can first execute the script within the context of the current shell using the source or . command and then simply call the function. See help source for more information.

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Well, while the other answers are right - you can certainly do something else: if you have access to the bash script, you can modify it, and simply place at the end the special parameter $@ - which will expand to the arguments of the command line you specify, and since it's "alone" the shell will try to call them verbatim; and here you could specify the function name as the first argument. Example:

$ cat test.sh 
testA() {
  echo "TEST A $1";
}

testB() {
  echo "TEST B $2";
}

# call arguments verbatim:
$@


$ bash test.sh
$ bash test.sh testA
TEST A 
$ bash test.sh testA arg1 arg2
TEST A arg1
$ bash test.sh testB arg1 arg2
TEST B arg2
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try:

. ./myScript.sh && func()

First register it in the context, then call the functions in the shell scripts.

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Briefly, no.

You can import all of the functions in the script into your environment with source (help source for details), which will then allow you to call them. This also has the effect of executing the script, so take care.

There is no way to call a function from a shell script as if it were a shared library.

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